Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, May 14, 1970 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 14, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gftiflene WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TH YEAR, NO. 330 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 14, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Associated Press lOc SUNDAY Police Arrest 8 in Ohio U Melee By ELLIK IIL'CKHR and HETTY GUISSOM What's the Secret To Fishing Success? Q. I would like lo know llic Ijcst place around Abilene lo fish ,il. The reason I'm so Interested Is llial every lime we _ go MR never calch a slnRlc thing. Why Is (his so? And whal kind of would ymi use. A. We asked The Reuorler-News fishing expert, Guy McCarly lo help lliis 12-ycai- old. Guy's answer: Fishing is funny nnd even Ihc Ijesl do not calcli fish, every lime they go, bul never catching a single thing is not right cilhcr. The best lake Wcsl Tcxans have ever had lo fish in is lluhbiird, any doubt. This is true lor bass, crappie, and cat. New Lake Colcman lias been very productive bul for two years the crappie have iiol done what was 'expected of them. The Fisharama at Phantom Hill will nearly always produce something lo pull on your line. A hoat is a near must for llnbbard as mo s I all the shore line is privately owned, so unless you know someone wilh a pier or boalhouse or crappie lionse, you have to have a uoal. Yon may not be fishing the right type water for the fish you are seeking, as knowing what's the surface of Hie walcr is Hie first must for a successful trip. Many pood bails are produced. Most any salesman in any of our sporting gnotl stores will be happy lo tell you what's selling test or taking the mosl fish, but the best way is two-fold: First, you must think FIMI and secondly you must go at the bcsL limes and in my opinion Hie bcsl time lo go is every time you get a chance. How much does llic Abilene Public School System pay llic West Texas llcliabililalicm Center for llic use of three rooms dining the stliool year? U Is my belief Ibat public printed answer to IMs would lie InlcveslliiR lo a great many readers, myself included. A Three Abilene Public School teachers conduct regular classes al Hie West Texas Rchabililalion Ccnler for physically handi- capped school age children who are unable to atlcnU or opcrale in normal classroom situations. This is a co-operative program between the school system and tbe rehab center for the benefit anil convenience of the Handicapped student. All three rooms and facilities are provided without charge by the rebab center and the teachers1 salaries are paid by the public school system, says Shelley -Smith, director of the West Texas Rehabilitation Center and A. I'l. Wells, superintendent of the Abilene Tiiblic Schools. As a child years ago, friends visiting my family at Clyde, Texas, and being from Van ZanuT, Texas, were introduced as being from the "free state of Van Zandt." tan you give me the origin oi this (itlc? Whether it referred lo Hie town, county, or region and why? Also, why n ripple of amusement often following MIC announcement. A At least two explanations have been given for calling it the- Free Stale of Van Zandl. When the new county was created politicians remarked thai Van Zandl was a free slate, free from debt. The term took on a new meaning at tno approach of the Civil War when Sidney S. Johnson of the Canton Times interviewed a slave driver seeking a site in Texas lo which lo bring his slaves for safety. Because of ihe sparseness of Negro peulalion in Ihe area, Ihe driver said he would as soon settle in a free slate as bring his slaves into Van Zandl County. Who named our Coin! Friday? Why dirt they name it Good Friday? A It isn't definitely known who or why it's called Good Friday bul there are two theories: The word good as used in Good Friday may have derived from the phrase find's Friday or it may refer to the good which came into the world as the result of the Life and Dealli of Jesus Christ. Q Where can I olilaln Information concerning the Merchant Marines? Hlial Is the age limit, where may I apply clc..' A We have forwarded lo you ALL the Information that was sent to us on the Merchant Marines from the U..S. Department of Commerce, Maritime Administration, in Washington, D. C. (this is the address for further They senl so much Info, surely this will be sufficient. Ask some people ihe lime and they'll tell you how lo make a watch, right? Address questions (o AcMon Line, Dos 30, Abilene, Texas, 73604. Names will nol be used hul questions must he signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers if possible.__________ lEWSllEX" Amusemenls 7D Business Notes Business Outlook 6C Bridge 6A Classified............4-7D Comics 1C Edilorials IOC Horosccpc 5A Hospital Polrcnls 8C Ofailuaries........... 2C Soorls I-JD This Mon'i Art 7D To Ycur Good Heollti------ 8D TV Leo............-, Women's News........3-5C TIHO ASSOCIATION I'HESS Ohio University students broke windows and sel small fires on campus and in down- town Aliens for two hours early today after shouting down an ai- Icmpl by university President Claude W. Sowlc lo address a protect rally. Police ballled Ihe rock-throw- ing demonstrators with tear gas in lie latest outbreak of vio- lence during a nationwide wave of student strikes and demon- strations protesting the Indochi- na war and Ihc killing of four Kent Slate University students. Up to 3.CCO students al the Ohio University had demonstrated unlit Wednesday when Sowle suspended seven students whom lie accused, without elaboration, of being threats to the security of Ihc university. "I am dedicated to Hie idea that Ibis simply can't be anoth- er Kent Stale or Ohio Stale" ivherc students closed their uni- versities, Sowle said. During Ihe disorders, eight students were arreslcd and an auxiliary police officer was in- jured by a rock Ihrown through a window of his cruiser. The student strike information center al Brandeis University in Wallham, Mass., reported 267 colleges and universities were on strikes of indefinite length. Tlie center reported 2B6 schools on strike Tuesday. A nationwide sampling showed 14 schools officially closed. Official Slapped With Pie in Face WASHINGTON (AP) Slap- stick invaded a hearing of Ihe Federal Obscenity Commission when a profanity-spouting un- derground press publisher shoved a cottage cheese pie in the face of an unsuspecting commission member. Curds oozing down his face and over llic front of his suit, Dr. Olto N. Larsen held his tem- per Wednesday and even man- aged a weak smile as Ihe perpe- trator, 28-year-old Thomas For- carte of the Underground Press Syndicate, unleashed a stream of profanity. Forcadc, of New York, said he was protesting the "unconsl- lulional, unlawful, prehistoric, obscene, absurd, Keystone Kommiltee." The incident cappud testimony by Forcade that had alt Ihc earmarks of a Mack Seimelt comedy. The bearded witness, arriving wilh about a dozen followers dressed in hippie garb, read a slalemenl bi'isliing with obscen- ilics and dcmading complete freedom of Ihe press. His testi- mony was accompanied by a tape recording of a Bob Dylan song, "You Doiil' Know Whxl's Happening, Do You, Mr. Members of his group, mean- time, passed around copies of underground newspapers lo commission who were smiling, others wilh slimy expressions. Larson, a sociology professor al the University of Washington (hen asked Forcade why he called Ihe committee session a witch bunt in his statement. Fort-ado said Ihe answers were in a box lie carried lo Ihe committee table. He look oul a a sheaf of papers from Ihe card- board box, revealing about a dozen pies undernearlh. Then he picked up Ihc lop pie nnd plopped it in the professor's face. "I refuse lo engage In any physical interaction with you, what is Ihe answer to my ques- Larsen said he recalled saying lo Forcade. Ilie commission, established three years ago (o analyze laws, determine distribution methods and study the effects of porno- graphy nn the public, recently invited national organizations to give (heir views on Ihe smut sit- uation. Forcade did: "For every pa- per destroyed by a bust (police 10 more have taken its place, and it the mess-age of (hat is not clear, Ihen you must surely have lo learn it by ex- he said. GETTING THF, BULL BY THE HORNS Apprentice Matador Jaime known as "lil becomes airborne atler a run in wilh a bull in Madrid's Las Vcnlas Arena. The Colombian bullfighter was nnliurt in the inci- dnet. The hull was brought to a halt hy assistants holding onto his tail. (AP Lubbock Moves Toward Recovery By MIKK COCHRAN Associated 1'rcss Writer LUHROCK, Tex. (AP) The vjlal signs of (his South Plains city pointed toward recovery to- day, dcspile lingering anxieties over the fate of a dov.'nlown sky- scraper crippled by a killer tor- nado. Although dcalh and damage figures mounted in tragic tan- dem, crews working around the clock restored much of the city's stricken power, water and com- munications capacity. Hundreds of National guards- men and slate police virtually eliminated the looting threat and the national disaster declaration by President Nixon freed un- specified federal funds lo aid victims of the devastated area. Besides this ravaged city of Ihe Plainview-Claren- don area batlered by twisters in mid-April will benefit from-Hie Presidential decision. The death loll from Monday night's lornadic fury stood today al 21, while official damage es- timates slipped past Hie million mark. Unofficial sources said losses could approach 5200 million dol- lars. The storm, punclualed wilh fierce winds, lefl more than injured, thousands homeless and staggered Hie city's lallesl struc- ture, Hie Grcal Plains Lite building. Despite some disagreement, a city official said Ihc modernistic, 20-story building appeared struc- turally sound. Hut it was treated as if il were condemned. Warning al one point via civil defense speakers that building is officials cor- doned off the structure and barred people from the area. They expressed particular concern over a cracked and Protesters, Demanding War End, Take Over HEW Office WASHINGTON (AP) Pro- lestcrs demanding an end to the war and higher welfare pay- ments occupied Hie office of Secretary of Welfare Robert 11. Finch for eight hours Wednes- day before 21 of them were ar- reslcd. The secretary was being in- terviewed by two reporters when 17 protesters invaded his office. For the next hour Finch listened as the group accused him of being a "yes man" and "flunky of President Nixon." Slitiuling angry warnings, (he protesters demanded Finch back a proposal lo raise Ihe minimum welfare benefils to per year for a family of four. They posled a sign on Ihc office wall saying or Fight" and took over Ihe secre- tary's de.sk and telephone. Asked about his view on Hie figure, Finch told Ihe group he was "proud of the Smug Itolion Women's Reign Of Six Years Coming to End ROTZO, Italy (AP) Italy's only municipal matriarchy is coming lo nn end. Tbe members of Ihe all-wom- en council, which has run this timber (own in the Alpine foot- hills since 1964, are stepping aside and letting Ihe menfolk take over again in elections June 7. The women had a self-satis- fied look as they prepared lo step out of office. Carla Slaviero, the spinster schoolteacher mayor, and Ihe seven farm women and village housewives of her council con- tend they pill Rotzo back in business. Five centuries of men's government had left the town in debt and disorganized. The women raised taxes and managed to settle a 30-year dis- pute with neighboring Valfaslico over division of the rich limber- ing rights in the nine forests of the surrounding hills. Rotzo's economic (roubles be- gan when Ihc Iwo communities were separated and Rolzo got the short end of Ihe timber rights. Debts piled up until Rolzo's menfolk decided to let Ihe slate send in an administrator. The men refused to run for munici- pal office. Miss Slaviero rallied the wom- en of Rntzo, declaring: "II is up lo us. It is a civic responsibili- ty." She and seven colleagues marched lo the lown hall anil filed an unopposed ticket. On election day, 236 most Ihe entire male electorate in blank ballots. Twen- ty-two other ballots were de- clared void because they con- tained rude remarks. The women were swept into office wilh their own solid front of 211 voles. The first months of the wom- en's administration, the men ac- cused them of meddling in men's affairs. Six of the eight women were married, and sev- eral were having such a rough lime at home that liiey wanted to resign. V One councilwoman, Antonietta Slaviero, said at first: "We should find some way oul of this without making ourselves ridi- culous." Alba Cosla said, "If I had known what I was gelling into, I would have stayed out of il." Bul after a year or so, when (he women began lo get things smoolhed oul, one councilwo- man decided: run things belter. Men are timid. It is easier to push them around." Annll.er concluded: "Women make fewer promises, but Ihcy keep them." Some men slill grumbled., oth- ers finally accepted Ihe council. One husband shrugged: "I'm still boss in my own home. Let them run cily hall." Two lickels are entered for the June 7 election. One is an all-male Independenl ticket. The other is a Christian Democrat slate with 10 men and Iwo wom- .Slaviero and a grade school leacher, Imclda Dal Poz- 20. part" he has played in gelling titc Nixon administration's a year welfare program stalled through Congress. The subject of the war In Southeast Asia also came up re- peatedly in the discussion. "Would you like lo sec your son be sent In a war that he might not come hack from with- out even a just Wash- ington Post reporter Ilaync.s Johnson quoted one of (lie pro- testers as asking Finch. "I'm as anxious that we 1cr- minalo this war as you Ihc secretary replied. And at another point, he said, "All I can say to that is I want Ihc war over as badly as anyone in this room." One of the protesters re- marked: "I hope wbcn they drop the bombs they drop one right here On this office, and one right on the White Hmisc." Nine more persons joined Ihc group during Ihe discussion he- fore Finch left his office in the early afternoon. Later he re- ceived a list of demands from Iwo members of the group. George Wiley, executive di- rector of Ihe National Welfare Rights OrganlTalinn, led the proleslers. There also were some welfare mothers from Philadelphia and several stu- dents from American University in Washington. "It's hard for llicm to sec all Ihe the Post quoted Finch as saying after he left his office. "Some of (hem arc genuine hardship cases, and some arc hard-core exploiters." An official IIKW slatcmcrt said: "Today's attempt to dis- nipt Ihe business of Ihr; depart- ment was counterproductive." Those arrested Wednesday night were charged wilh disor- derly conduct. crumbling outer wail bul, for liie first lime, Wednesday per- mitted occupants In enter and remove business files and other possessions. The downtown area was hit hard, but Ihe area immediately north suffered incredible dam- age. Homes and businesses wore leveled in some cases and re- duced lo shells in others. Two molds were demolished. To Hie relief of parents across the country, Texas Tech es- caped extensive damage and none of its students re- ceived .serious injury. However, University Presi- dent Grnvcr Murray cancelled commencement exercises sched- uled for Saturday and said de- grees would bo mailed to gradu- ates. The municipal coliseum on Ihe Tech campus remained Ihe ma- jor temporary .shelter for many of those lefl homeless by the disaster. Fewer than 100 persons- were slill officials said, bul the storm claimed its 2Isl fatality Wednesday. Hcose Air Force Base Hospital identified Hie victim as Mrs. Ola Hello Ualcfi, 77. IfBATHEJT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU (Wearhcr map, M. Kl ABILENE AND VICINITY radim) Parlly wilh icaMtrfrf Ih-jrtferslorms loday, icxiFght ard Friday. Cooler Friday. PrntMbMiiy or rain I.-..1 afternoon y> per cenl, Incrraslng To-unhl and FrldA? lo io per conl. Hiu'i flrwv-d low near 65. Frktoy f-'nh fll. Winds joulh.erlv !oday from IC-15 mp h High ar-d for erdir.g al a.m.: E7 ard 64. High ar-d low tof Ire same day lail year: !J Sur.scl lasl nighl: p.m j iur.rlv? lodav: a.m.; lunstl IcnigM: p.m. The While House announced thai President Nixon's daughter Julie and her husband, David Eisenhower, have decided not to atlcnd Iheir graduation exer- cises al Smith and Ainherst col- leges. Anliwar protests have been going on at both schools. President and Mrs. Nixon had indicated they wauled to attend Julie's graduation from Smith, scheduled .May 23. The two young people decided not to return to Iheir campuses al all. A spokesman said both have good enough grades to re- ceive diplomas without further exams. Police in Blacksburg, Va., used dogs lo help in evicting about 100 war prolestei-s from a building they had occupied over- night on the campus of dent Virginia Polytechnic Insti- tute. Laler, 200 slate troopers formed a ring around the home of the institute's president, Dr. T. Mai-shall Halm Jr., lo hold off a crowd of 'studenls who demanded amnesty for llmsc arrested. In Ypsilanti, Mich., students from HSOD-sliidcnl. Eastern Michigan University broke glass and furniture on campus despile a stale of emergency declared by Gov. William Miliikcn Tues- day after two nights of violent (Jeinonslralious. There wore 15 lo 20 arrcsls. Gov. Richard P.. Ogilvic or- dered Illinois National Guardsmen into Carbnndnle be- cause of continued lurmoil at Ihc Southern Illi- nois University. Although some students had urged Hie school to remain open, thousands of sludcnts snug and" danced in Hie slrccls when il was announced the uni- versity would close fur an "in- definite lime." In Marl font, Conn., about 100 adults marched from llic Old Slate Mouse lo llic Stale Capitol lo call for an end to (lie.Indochi- na war (Ins year. They can-led a sign saying, "Peace is loo im- portant In leave lo the kids." The group, made up of busi- ness and professional people, was joined by another 200 adults during Ihc march. Across from Hie White House, in Lafayette Park, some 50 slu- denls from Westminister Choir College in Princeton, N.J., hold- ing aloft a banner reading, "Singers for sang (heir especially composed "peace an- Ihem." Chance for Rain Increases Tonight Wcalber or nol Abilene would be placed under another severe thunderstorm watch again, the weatherman is not sure. Hnl chances for thunder- storms arc pnl at .10 per ccnl this afternoon, doubling for lonighl and Friday lo GO per ccnl, according lo the weather bureau's Thursday morning forecast. The lasl Iwo days storm watches have been in cffccl. Last night's extended from 6 p.m. Wednesday until Wed- nesday midnight covering Taylor, Fisher, Mitchell, Nolan and .Scurry counties. There was one Tuesday nighl. Rain was reported in several places in Hie Uig Country Wed- nesday including Paint Rock with .12 inch and Winters wilh an inch even. Winter's also reported hail. Wednesday niglil storms were sighted four miles east of llamlin and 25 miles northeast nf Snydcr. llcrmlcigh gnt an inch and Goree .95. 'Wouldn't Enough'at Drug Rally ''Ten thousand wouldn't he said Troy Sampley, chair- man of Menial Health Week, describing attendance possibilities al llic ''Mary Jane's Cop n rally lo be held al p.m. in Oscar Rose 1'ark Thursday lo educate' people on drug abuse. Featured speaker is nationally drug expert from the University of California al lierkelcy, Dr. Hardin H. Jones. Hob Sewell will ho master of ccicmonics and Diane Tyll, Abilene, will be on hand lo welcome Dr. Jones. Enlerlainmcnl will be provided by ''The a local group. Dr. Jones, who holds degrees in bio-chemistry and physiology, is a professor of medical physics and physiology at Berkeley. He has dene extensive research on Ihe iclcntificalion of problems slcmming from drug use and drug abuse. Jones is scheduled lo hold a similar rally at Ihc Colton Howl in Dallas Saturday, where supporters are cxpccling persons lo turn oul. The public is invited lo ihe Hose Park rally, which is being spon- sored by the Abilene Menial Health Assn. as part of Menial Health Week. Local high school and college students have been meeting during the week to formulaic plans.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication