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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 6, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 6, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gfoflene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TH YEAR, NO. 322 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 6, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press 20c SUNDAY ABILENE CAMPUS LEADERS SPEAK Kent State: 'Taste of What's Ahead' By BRBNDA GREENE Hcportcr-Ncws Staff Writer "This could be just a small lastu or what is ahead-for us during (he next three monllis or the 1969-70 Abilene Chris- tian College student body presi- dent said of the recent anti-war demonstrations and violence on the Kent Slate University campus. "I'm not an Walt Cabc said. "Hut because ol tlie involvement or Ilio U.S. in Indo- china il could soon be the breaking point in the responsible sludent's he said. The presidents of the three Abilene colleges student bodies for the past academic year voiced concern over the recent demonstrations thai resulted in the deaths of four studenls and President Nixon's move into Cambodia. Cabc said that lie feared slu- dent leaders who have tried to work with the establishment are going to adopt the attitude of "wliy work there anymore." "I also fear that those who are conservatives will become more moderate and the moderates more he said. Ed Williamson, president of Ihe McMurry Student Assn., said "This thing just makes my blood boil, but maybe I don't know the full story." "I don't have the answers, myself, but il we would keep a cooler head about it, we could avoid things like Kent he said. Ralph Thornhill, Hardin-Sim- mons University student body president, said he fell It was .necessary for the Guard to step in at Kent State, but "it was a1 tragic thing that had to happen." "No violent demonstration is right, but a stand should be taken concerning the U.S. involvement in he said. "After all, it is the students who will be in- Sec STUDENTS, Pg. 6A WALT CABE ACC student chief ED WILLIAMSON McM student head RALPH THOHNHILL leader at H-SU Reds Boycott Paris Talks Hanoi Says U.S. Continuing Air Raids in North By STEPHENS BItOENING Associated Press Writer I'ARIS (AP) Hanoi accused the United Slates of continuing air raids over North Vietnam and said it was boycotting to- day's peace talks session as a North Vietnam every day from protest and a warning. The meeting was canceled. Spokesman Nguyen Thanh Le said American planes had bombed populated areas of Hay 1 thorough Tuesday lie said American planes raided North Vietnam in an area south of [he 19th Parallel at 1 p.m. Vietnam lime Tuesday. Lo told a news conference the. attacks were "barbarous acts of war" which violated the U.S. pledge to slop the bombing. The bomb Mat was a key element in the agreement to being plenary COPPING-A This girl demonstrator at the American Uni- versity protest in Washington Tuesday playfully takes a back seat on a police: motor scooter as students lied up evening rush hour traffic handing out leaflets. The young lady had a way about her and all seemed to take her back-seat protest with a sense of humor. (AP Wircphoto) Students Across U.S. Answer Coll for Strike By THE ASSOCIATED TRUSS Students at a growing number of campuses across America today responded to calls for a nationwide strike against President Nixon's Cambodian policy and the Kent State killings. Some universities shut down altogether, others held rallies, prayer meetings or vigils. There were clashes with on some campuses. On Borne others, there were indications of support for Ihe move into Cambodia. National Guardsmen patrolled at the University of Wisconsin in Madison alter, police said, more than 35 persons were arrested in two days of window smashing and firebomb vandalism. University spokesmen estimated persons attended a campus rally Tuesday night to protest the Presi- dent's deployment of troops in Cambodia and lo hear a "people's petition" against the Kent deaths. The rally was peaceful but there was vandalism afterward. The current wave of protests was touched off Monday when National Guardsmen called out by Ohio Gov. James A. Bhodes to control antiwar demonstrations at Kent State, fired into a crowd. Four students were killed. The Faculty Senate Tuesday blamed Rhodes and his adjutant S. T. Del Corse, for the deaths. "We hold the guardsmen, acting under orders and under severe psychological pressures less respon- sible for the massacre than our Gov. Rhodes and Gen. Del Corse, whose inflamatory indoctrination produced those pressures, the 550-member senate said in a resolution. Census Data Due Today "Were You Coupon, Pg. SB Hichard Newton of Wichita Falls, district manager of Ihe Census Bureau, said Wednesday that he hoped that reports of the 1970 Census from Taylor County would begin arriving today. lie said that no enumerating was bcind done now in Taylor County, "ft's just a matter of checking the paper lie said. He explained that in the case of Abilene and Taylor County, some enumeration districts contain college complexes and this took a little more time than an average enumeration. Newton said that response has been good to the "Were You form which was pub- lished in Sunday's Abilene Heporter-News and is being published again today. Newton also said that it would be awhile yet before a prelimi- nary report could be given on the 1970 Census. He said Ihe procedure is that when reports are complete to notify Wash- ington and "they tell us when to release the report." lie said the District office in Wichita Falls was supposed to be closed on Friday but "it looks like that is impossible." New President HOUSTON, Tex. ford H. Prewelt war, elected Tuesday as president elect of the Houstiri Bar Association in a tight three-man race. Prewett, 58, nosed out. J. Paul Pomeroy Jr. and Willelt Wilson. NEWS INDEX Amusements 4B Bridge I3A Classified 10-13B Comics 9B Editorials SB Horoscope............ )3A Hospital Potientc 5A Obituaries 9-11A To Your Good Health____ MB TV Log...............7B Women'j News 2.3B OVERDOGGED? They makR delicious, foot-long hot dogs at Days Festival Carnival in. Corpus Christi. But Tina Greer, 2, makes it plain that they don't make buns that long. Her hot dog stuck otit a little but it still lasle'd just as good. (AP Wirephoto) Wallace Faces Runoff Taft Prevails in Ohio By n. MEAHS AP Political Writer Gnnrge C. Wallace and Gov. Albert Brewer fought to a stand- off in Alabama's Democratic gubernatorial primary while in Ohio Rep. Hoberl A. Taft rallied lo defeat Gov. James A. Rhodes for the GOP Senate nomination. Tafl will opposo Democrat How- ard Melzenbaum who downed former astronaut, John II. Glenn. Neither Wallace, a fonncr governor of his slate, nor Brew- er, the incument, managed a majority They will engage in a runofr primary June 2. These were the Tuesday re- turns: Alabama, with of ballol boxes counted gave Wal- lace and Brewer 2JH.7I3. Uncovered Trash Trucks Criticized By BLUE ItUCKEfl and BETTY GRISSOM Q. Why docs the city of Abilene allow Jrash trucks to haul trash out to (he clly dump without being cohered or el least fix It so It will not blow all over Ihe fclghway? On N. Trcadway and Pine, on the way lo the clly dump, H looks like a city dump all the way down those streets. Trucks come by with all Idnds of trash blowing off Into the street. A. Charles Nolen of the Refuse Department says it must be trucks other than city refuse trucks because they are all covered except the brush trucks. They haven't had too much trouble with trees falling off, he says. Nolen suggests reporting immediately any cily refuse (ruck losing its load to the Refuse Department, giving the location and number ti trucks. The supervisor will make an investigation and corrective action will be taken, he says. Q. Could yon tell me where I coald obtain a (feck of (arot cards? I am also Interested In finding books telling how lo read the. cards and or nnmberology and astrology-? A. After checking all the card shops, book stores, and several other places, we decided this is a very popular subject. Everyone we talked to said they sold out as fast as they got cards in. The books on astrology are very popular and hard to keep but a couple of the book shops will order them for you. Try calling the card shops and leaving your phone number for them to call when the next shipment comes in. It they're not on hand when you call and you are in a rush, write to: Horizons Unlimited Store, 1003 West Ave., Austin, Tex., 78701, and give them your order. Q. How docs (he school board choose teachers and how do they review them for renews! of their contracts? A. Teachers are hired by a screening process by (he director of personnel and are recommended lo the board with the approval of the superintendent. After the teacher has taught, he or she is evaluated by the principal of the school and school supervisors. This evaluation or rating shed is turned into Ihe superintendent of personnel and is available to the school board, says A. E. Wells, superintendent of Abilene Schools. Q. Why are the children only allowed one recess a day and do not have a play period at lunch? This Is Ihe first school system I have seen thai doesn't let the children eat at lunch. A. The primary grades are usually allowed two play periods, says one elementary principal. One is a short break ar.d the other Is a supervised physical edu- cation period for the benefit of Ihe child's health. Rest periods are recommended hy the health experts after eating Instead of play, so most teachers read to the children or play records alter lunch, he says. Q. Can you give me the old rhymes lor earn day of the week on which a child Is born? I can remember only two lines; "Wednesday's child Is lull of grace, Thursday's child Is fair ol face." A. Our memory fails us, too, so Mrs. Klfa Sykes at the Children's Reference Desk in the Abilene Public Library found it in "The Family Book of Best Loved Poems." It goes like this: Monday's child is of fair face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far In go, Friday's child is loving and giving, Saturday's child works hard for its living; and a child born on the Sabbath Is lair, and wise, and good, and gay." Address questions lo AC'llon Line Box 30, Abilene, Xoxas 79COI. Names will not he used hut questions must be signed anil addresses given. Please Include leFeptwe numbers II possible, Ohio, wilh all voting unils reporting, gave Taft votes to for Rhodes. Melzcnbaum received 427.2M voles lo for Glenn. The. Dcmocralic nominalinn for governor of OJiio was won by John J. Gilligan, a former con- gressman. He will oppose He- publican Roger Cloud, the Silalc auditor. Taft closed steadily on Rhodes who had enjoyed an early lead on Inn basis of rural voles. Taft look the lead when he carried Cuyshoga County considered a Rhodes stronghold, by a majority of votes. Glenn, on the basis of an early lead, made promaturc claims of victory over Mclzenbaum, a wealthy Cleveland atlorney. Tafl, also a man of wealth, re- leased figures during the cam- paign that showed a personal fortune of about million. In addition to his law prac- tice, Molzenbaum owns a siring of parking lots and a group of neighborhood newspapers around Cleveland. The Senate scat sought by Tall and Mctzcnbaum is now hnld by Democrat Stephen M. Young, an Octogenarian, who Is Young's scat is vital lo Republicans hoping to capture the seven more scats nccdsd to take control ol the Senate alter the Nov. 3 elections. negotiations among North Viet- nam, the Viet Cong, South nam and the United Stales. "To express its firm protest against these extremely grave acts of [he United Le said, "the delegation of the Democratic Republic of (North) Vietnam declares it will not par- ticipate in the 66th plenary ses- sion of the Paris conference." He said Ihe boycott was a warn- ing as well as a protest. lie said North Vietnam was ready to meet again May 14. Viet Cong spokesman Ly Van Sail said tlie Viet Cong was backing Ihc boycott "to express its prolouml indignation and vig- orous protest" against U.S. bombing anil "widening oi tho war throughout Indochina." U.S. Ambassador Philip C. Habib, acling delegation, chief, said, "We reject the reasons they have given and the falsa allegations that accompanied. Uicm. "This is further evidence of (he intransigence and unwilling- ness to engage in meaningful, negotiations which have charac-. (crizcd Ilieir attitude ho said. "Hanoi has taken upon itself the responsibility for refusing lo meet today as had been agreed. The burden rests squarely on them." Ifabib said it had always been understood that despite the bomb half the United Stales re- served tho right to pursue re- connaissance flights over North Vietnam. "We have said we would take whatever measures arc neces- sary lo protect our reconnais- sance aircraft and their pilots There has been no change in our policy of jwnleolive reac- tion." At a news conference on Mon- day, the North Vietnamese Im- plied that if the raids continued they would suspend the peace talks. At lhat time Le would not commit his delegation to attend- ing today's meeting. He simply replied the "Nixon administra- tion must shoulder the entire re- sponsibility for the conse- quences flowing" from tho raids. Habib said at an embassy news conference "Ihe other side" had notified the delegation in writing of Hanoi's refusal to atlcnd today's mecling. He said the rules of procedure for the conference permitted either side lo annul a scheduled session right up lo meeting time. WEMTrTEF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EiSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wuiher PO- 5A) ABILENE AND VICINITY W-mHi radius) Generally fair today through Thurify wllti warm aMemooru and cool nTohti, Htoh In 80s. Lew Wednesday nlflhl mid Hlflh Thursday mid KM. southerly 5-1S mp.h- High and tow lor 74-noun tndfng at 9 am.: T9 53. High and km (or the year: JO fl-d Sur-iiT rait nlghl: p.m.I lunrlio laday: a.m.; jurwt tonight: I; 33 p.m. NEED CASH? look around the house and garage for those items lhat you no longer use. Sell them In Ihe Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days to Exltniki or Refnd if TMi Rift ApproximalfTy 15 Average Worr'i No Phone Orders Only '00 CASH IN ADVANCE YON SAVE SI.95 ABILENE RIPORTER.NEWS DEADUNE THURS. 3 P.M.   

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