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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 28, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 28, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 89TH YEAR, NO. 314 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 28, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press (ff) lOc SUNDAY Young Rockefeller Learns Through VISTA Larry and Harlem Block Won't Be the Same By DKE WKDEMEYEK NEW YORK. (AP) Larry Rockefeller, Ihe niodesi 25- year-old millionaire who be- came a block worker in Harlem, lias retired after more than Ilircc years there. Neither Lar- ry nor Use block will be Ihe same again. Lurry, a handsome, blond 'STICKS' TO A TASK Prince Bcrtil, youngest son of Sweden's King Gustaf Adolf, carries a spiked slick for a litter picking in one baud and a paper bag in the other as he walks through a Stock- holm park. His fullilling his task as an honorary member of a welfare organiza- tion called "city pnrlors" which look part in a city cleanup drive. {Al' Vi'irephoto) Harvard graduate who is the son of conservationist Laurance S. Rockefeller and nephew of two governors ,said he is now much less "naive" about how- fast change can be accom- plished. "Now I have an understand- ing of how deep and complex the problems are and how slow change comes with what great effort and with how many set- said Larry after retir- ing Monday. Some residents said l.irry has done an immeasurable amount of good and paint proudly lo a bright, red and white block flag flying above the block as a sym- bol of their accomplishments. "It's a symbol of our moving said Herbert Battle, a bicy- cle mechanic who is president of [he block corporation. "Peo- ple you couldn't talk lo before will pilch in and help now. Lar- ry djdn't do everything for no one. lie assisted us, because if someone docs something.for you it's no good." Larry said that when lie joined in Service lo America, a federally sponsoi-ed volunteer program which trains block envisioned making his block an "extremely different place" aft- er llirce years but that he immediately experienced set- backs. .S. Loses 5 More Aircraft Accidental Bombing Kills 10 S. Viet Militiamen By GEORGE ESPER Assoiiatcrt Press Writer SAIGON (AP) The U.S. Command announced today Hie loss of five more aircraft in which 15 Americans died and six were wounded, and an acci- dental bombing by U.S. planes that killed 10 Vietnamese mili- tiamen and wounded 20 othci's. Eight of the Americans were killed in an Army UIll helicop- ter shot down Monday in Hie Central Highlands 21 miles southeast of Plciku City. The only survivor was wounded. Another six Americans were killed and two injured early to- day when a twin-engine ACll'J gunsliip crashed and burned in a rice field just after taking off from Saigon's Tan Son Nhul Air- Base. Spokesmen said cause of the crash was under investi- gation, but it appeared that the plane developed mechanical trouble. An OHIi observation helicopter crashed Monday while tlying to evade enemy ground fire within a mile of Hie Cambodian border 07 miles northwest of Saigon. Two Americans were wounded, a spokesman said. U.S. headquarters also made a delaved announcement of the By ELLIE RUCKER and BETTY GRISSOM Will Power Plant Harm Lake's Fish? Q. Will West Texas Utilities' new planl on Lake Fort Phantom have untiling towers? If so, will It he enough so as not to harm our fish'.' A. The plant will not use cooling lowers and according to research done by Texas Electric Service Co., placing the plant on the lake will have no harmful effects on the fish. In fact, according to their report (which we are sending you) circulation and mixing of Ihe lake water by the plant and Ihe addition of warmer water to the lake tends to extend Lhc productive season of the fish and often increases the amount of game fish produced _ in reservoirs. Q. I'm Interested in knowing the three business streets in Abilene that carry Ihe most traffic. A. Number one busiest street is S. 1st, second busiest is N. 1st and then S. 14th. Fourth busiest street is Ambler, says Traffic Engineer Bud Taylor. On N. and S. 1st Ihe most heavily traveled sections are between Willis and Grape. The busiest section on S. 14lh is between Sayles and Wil- lis. Q. T have a scl of 50-year-old Bavarian China. Several nieces were broken in shipping and I would like to have (hem repaired, not for use hut tor display. Can you tell me of a person or place In Abilene dial could ilo it for me? A. We're sending you the name of a hobby Shop lhat will do this. They'll have lo see Ihe china before tlicy can give you an estimate. If it has been glued before it will cost a little more as they have to remove all the glue before starling the repair work. Q. You slated in Action Line dial 5313 sleel pennies were worth about 50 cents for ono. each from (lie three mints. I would like to know where they are worlh this. A. The coin dealers sell a set of three (one from each mint, as you said) for 50 cents. If you have a set you want to sell you'd have lo find a collector who's looking for one of those sets and be would probably pay 50 cents as that's Ihe going price. Com Dealers will buy them if you have 100 or more sets, bul they buy in quantity, not just one set. Q. I'm trying to locate a dealer ot the new "Zoysia" grass. I Jive in Roscoc and would like (o know the nearest one In this area. A. Hope your chariot's in good working order you have a long ride ahead. The closest dealer is Jim Eagle Turf Center at 2600 W. Vickery, Kt. Worth 76101. He doesn't even slock it yet, but will order it for you out ol Arkansas, if you'll write him. It lakes about two weeks and cosls about ?-i a yard in small quantities. Zoysia is a fine bladcd, deep green plush turf that must sprigged (not is slow-growing, but bcaiilifu] when it covers. Address questions In Aclion Line, Box 34, Abilene, Texas 73C8I. Names will not be uscrt bul questions must be signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers 11 possible, Pilots Bail Oul During Hail Storm CHARLESTON, S. C. (AP) Their faces bloodied from iug hail during their descent, two Air Force Fliers recovered today at the Charleston Air Force Base dispensary from a fool parachute drop inlo Ihe Atlantic Ocean 150 miles east or here. A severe llumderslom Mon- day disabled Ihe F4 Phantom jet-bomber they were ferrying from Warner Robins Air Force Base in Georgia to the United Stales' Torrejon AKB in Spain. "The equipment worked just as Capl. Daniel 25, of Grand Rapids, Mich., Ihe pilol, reported. Lt. MacArlliur Weston, 23, of Jacksonville, N. C., said he be- gan transmitting radio signals as soon as his life raft inflated and he had clambered into it. Rescue planes spotted them and a tanker, the Texaco Illi- nois, was diverted from eight miles away to pick them up aft- er they hart been in the water Iwo hours. -Remembering a survival les- son, Weslon said, "I drank my fill, lapping at Ihe rain flowing clomi the harness" of Ihe para- chute after the descent. "We said a few prayers be- fore we were safe anr. Hcilz said. "Everything went smoothly, thanks lo the tanker crew." A helicopter picked them up from the tanker for the trip to Charleston. loss of a medical evacuation helicopter last Thursday to ene- my ground fire two miles north- west nf Ihe besieged Dak Seang Special Forces camp in the Cen- tral Highlands. No casualties were reported. But it was (he 15lh American aircraft lost at Dak Scaug since the North Viet- namese laid siege lo the camp on April 1. The fifth American low was an Air Force figliter-bomber that was hit last Saturday on a mission over Laos. The crew tried lo gel back to ils base in Thailand hut crashed southeast of Khon Kaon, in Thailand. The pilot was killed and the copilot injured. These losses raised to the number of planes and heli- copters the U.S. Command has reimrled losl since Jan. 1, 1051. The accidental bombing oc- curred Monday aftenioon along the coastal lowlands 77 miles soulheasl of .Da Naug. "Two U.S. Marine A4 aircraft accidentally delivered bombs on civilian irregular defense group forces while on a bombing mis- sion in response to a request from ground a U.S. communique said. "The acci- dent is under investigation." The U.S. Command said there were 32 enemy rocket aixi mor- tar attacks from 8 a.m. Monday lo 8 a.m. Tuesday, wilh one American killed and 17 wound- ed. U.S. B52s dropped 450 Ions of bombs loday within a mile of (he Cambodian bonier and south of Ihe suspected head- quarters of the Viet Cong high command, American spokes- men said. One o; his yonlli council lead- ers became a junkie, city agen- cies were filled wilh red lape, and a chicken franchise which he and Ihe block corporation had planned to get to raise funds and employ welfare moth- ers fell through when a key per- son backed out. On the olhcr hand, a park opened Sunday where (here once was a rubbish-filled lot and there's now a library in a once- vacant store. There's a class- room building, a full-scale tutor- ing program, a community cen- ter and a preschool building with a full-lime teacher. Larry joined VISTA in the fall of and moved inlo a pre- dominantly black and Puerto Rican block of Harlem. Except for six months in the Army re- serves, a brief call-up to deliver mail during the postal slrike and Irips lo the mountains wilh neighborhood kids, he rarely left the block. Arici- selling up the 121st Block Corp., the organization and Ixi ITV solicited from General Electric for the corpo- ration and another for purk from Ihe New York Mission Society and the New York Community Trust. A publisher donated books and a sporting goods com- pany donated SIM basketballs-- one for every two of the block's BOO residents. "For a while everyone wns bouncing recalled Larry. The block is still blighted by Iwo nibble filled lots, an occa- siona abandoned car and gar- bage strewn about. However, clean-ups are held periodically, 15 trees have been planted and seven previously blank walls are painted wilh the briglil geomelric designs by ar- lisl William Williams. Larry has lived in a moulli leiieniont, shared all Ihe block's problems-even having Ihe tires on his maroon sports car learned all Ihe residents' names. When lie steps onlo Ihe street, children swarm about hin squealing his name and lugging nt his arms for attention. Larry said he is leaving lo work in conservalion because he believes (he block and ils corpo- ration can sland on its own. But the residents have been assured he'll be back anytime they need help. LEAVING THE SCFA'E Negroes leave n slore on Cooliclge Street in Tlivcr Rouge, Mich., Monday after a rock throwing incident, anel fighting erupted between while and black students at rncially troubled River Rouge High School. (AP Wirephoto) 2 Economists See Inflation Slowdown High School leads to Fighti Eggs Thrown At U.S. Envoy STOCKHOLM (AP) Dcm- onslivitors threw eggs al the new American ambassador lo Sweden, Jerome Holland, al Hie official opening of a U.S. cultur- al missed. The eggs were thrown as Hol- land walked from his car lo Ihe building Monday. Police arrest- ed seven dcmonsirators who formed a ring and burned an American flag. The demonstrators were pro- testing U.S. military involve- ment in Vietnam. NEED CASH? Look around the house and garage for those items thai you no longer use. Sell Idem in Ihe Family Week-Ender 3 Lines 3 Days KB Erieniien or Refund II Thll Rib Approximately 15 Worfli No Phone Orders PIcale Only 00 CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE SI.95 ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M, By STEPHEN II. U'lLDSTROM Associated Press Writer RIVER Mich. (AP) Racial feelings, frazzled by weeks of black-while hostility, remained raw today in this in- dustrial Detroit suburb, where a clash between black and while high school students led lo rock-throwing, looling and tlie burning of three stores. The high school, a center of tension since Febiuary, was or- dered closed until further notice by the school board. Seven police officers and an unknown number of civilians were injured in Ihe disorder Monday. Two of (lie officers re- quired hospital treatment. A stale of emergency with a G p.m. lo 5 a.m. curfew was or- dered by Mayor John McEwan after a boxcar burst into flames on the Pcnn Central Railroad Iracks near the school. The disorder started alter black students held a grievance meeting in the high school gym. NEWS INDEX Amusements...........6A Business News......... I OA Bridge ..............4A, Classified 5-8B Comics 4B Editorials..............2B HorOKCpD 8B Mcspilal Patients........3A Cbiluarics.............2A Spcrls 8.9A This Man's Art.........6A To Your Good Health____4A TV Loq.............. 1 IA Women's News.........3B Fights broke out in the slrcels around the school. Groups of black and while sludenls polled each olhcr, police and passing cars with rocks and bailies. Most of Ihe injuries occurred during the rock throwing. As police reinforcements moved in from surrounding communities, bands of black youths set up barricades on Vis- gar Streel, the cenlral business street of the black communities of River Rouge and the adjacent suburb of Ecorse, and began looling stores. In addition lo the Ihrcc stores hurncd, several were lorn apart by looters, wire threw some goods and fixtures inlo Ihe slreel. At about 8 p.m. a force of about 200 policemen bolslcrcd by aboul 60 Slate Police troop- ers began a sweep up Ihe street. The heavily armed officers marched up the I3-block stretch dispersing the rcmnanls of Ihe crowd as I hoy advanced. No figures on the lolal num- ber of arrests were made pub- lic, although it was announced that four adulls and six juve- niles were arrested in the dis- turbances near the school. River Rouge, a community of dominated by the smoke- stacks of Delroit's downriver in- dustrial complexes, has been ra- cially Icnse for weeks. WASHINGTON (AP) Eco- nomic indicators no'nl to a sharp slowdown in inflation this fall, two lop economists predict. They made their statements on a day the stock market suffered its worst slump in six years and other signs revealed a troubled economy. In making Ihis assessment in speeches to (he United Stales Chamber of Commerce Monday, Walter W. Heller, former chair- man of Ihe Council of Economic Advisers under former Presi- dent Johnson, and Herylc W. Sprinkel of Chicago supported Nixon administration conten- tions lhat Ihe over-all price rise will slow sharply in Iho aulumn. But, as Uiey spoke, other'indi- cations of a sagging economy caused concern in (he business community. In New York, the stock mar- kel's Dow Jones Industrial aver- age fell 12.14 points lo 735.15, the worst drop since Nov. 22, 19B3, Ihe day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. And, in Detroit, General Mo- tors and Ford, the nation's larg- est automobile manufacturers, said lhat auto sales and profits were down in the opening quar- ter IJiis year, although bolh still finished in Ihe black. Ford reported its consolidated sales in Ihe opening three monlhs rlown by 5 per cent. Al Ihe While House, President Nixon conferred wilh his Coun- cil of Economic Advisers and five other economists called in for a special discussion of Ihe nation's economic outlook. WEATHER V. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wcalhcr Map, pg. 3A) ABILENE AND VICINITY 1-B-mik; la partly cloudy a sliqhl charce for widespread aflcrnocn and evenirKj thunder5hov.crs. Chance cf rain ihrcugh Wednesday 23 per cent. Continued warm. Htgh Tjutscay war TO. Tuesday n.grrt upper Winds scjlterly from 10-25 m p.h. diminishing Wcdrrsday. Wmd are up en area laKes. High nr-d fw 24-hours trdrr.g at 9 a.m.: 79 ard Hiqh ar.d low wmo dale last year; 49 ard J9, Suniel lair Sil7 p.m.; sunrise Icrtay: a.m.; sunid ion's hi: p.m Rep. Reuss' Kit Aids Pollution Battle By KDMOND I-CI1RRTON Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A congressman's offer of a do-it- yourself pollution enforcement kit has brought inlo being a small army of militant conser- vationists lo do battle in federal courts against industrial slream-foulers. The kit was assembled by Hep. Henry S. Reuss, after he uncovered a rarely- used 1800 law banning (he dis- charge of wasles into streams inviling citizens to start action against polluters and be rewarded with half of any fines that result. Reuss kicked things off by in- voling Ihe law in affidavits filed with U.S. allorneys in Wisconsin alleging violations by 149 firms. After he announced his action April 2, mail from conserva- lion-minded citizens began com- ing in. To reply, liouss had the kit produced in quantity. It contains pertinent sections of Ihe 1803 law, a House Com- mittee report further explaining the provisions, directions for in- voking it ond a list of officials throughout (he count ry. So far, 338 kits have been sent In inquirers from 35 slates and Ihe District of Columbia, Renss said in an interview. About 50 more went to colleges and or- ganizations. One inquirer who asked for a kit wrole, "We in eastern North Carolina coulri use an effective lool to prevent the further foul- ing of our environment in Ihe name of a ruthless 'progress'." And from a West Virginia stu- dent: "When the students find out you arc actually doing something, well, you'd bctler in- crease your staff to handle the mail." The 189} law prohibits dis- ,_ charging liquid drainage and navi- gable streams or their tributar- ies. "That covers just about every Hcuss remarked. "What I really he said, "is lhat actions under Ihis law will .accelerate efforts by indus- try lo eliminate pollution. I am much more interested in having lhat happen than in getting fines. "Hut as it stands now, most stale laws arc inadequate and federal actions have resulted in little more than slaps on Ihe wist."   

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