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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 20, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 20, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                JdAJUIrllv WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR" FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TH YEAR, NO. 305 PHONE ABILENE, TEXAS, 78604, MONDAY EVENING" APRIL 20, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS" Associated Press (IP) lOc SUNDAY GREETINGS FOR ASTRONAUTS Apollo 13 com- marider. James A. Lovell Jr. acknowledges a greeting from a friend as he holds liis son, Jeff, 4, after ar- riving back in Houston Sunday "iglil. In background at right is Dr. Tfolicrl E. Gil ruth, director of the Manned Spacecraft Center. In center photo, Mary La Rocque of Syracuse, N.Y., is embraced by com- mand module pilot, John L. Swigcrt Jr. as he ar- rived. After the embrace the young lady stepped back and admired her hero while Swigcrt seemed to enjoy the scene. (AP Wirephoto) LINE By ELL1E RUCKKil and BETTY GRISSOM How Can Student Here Cast Vote? Q. I would like lo know how students who arc eligible to vote and arc not permanent residents of Taylor County can vole. We arc eligible in our county, since it is our permanent residence, lint cannnt vole since we will not be there. have registered to vote and would like (o know how lo go ahoiil il. A. ffrilc lo Ihe county where yon arc registered and have an absentee ballol senl to you by mail. Take Ihc ballol to the Abilene County Clerk's Office by April 2S or to a nolary public any time now and election day 1ml il must mailed lo arrive in your home county scat before elec- tion day (May 2 if you live in says Mrs. Chester Hnlchcson, Taylor County Clerk. Q. Can nn 18-year-old uoy who Is In the service he married wllhoul his par- ents conscnl? A. Depends on the laws in Ihe slale where Ihc marriage is In lake place. In Texas a male must be 19 or have his parents' consent whether he is in the service or not. To obtain a marriage license, a man must have a blood lest and proof of age must be presented or written consent ol parents if under age. To obtain a written consent Hie parents musl fill out forms in the county clerk's office in Ihc county where they reside. These forms must lie presented lo the county clerk in the county where the license is" lo be issued, says Mrs. Chester Hulcheson, County Clerk. Q. Could you Icll me on what dale our government began flying Cubans over In Florida? Also, Is that operation still going on? And do you know how much Ihc government pays these people at (lie present lime? I understand lhat we jiald (hem S100 per monlh at Ihc beginning and thai Ihe amount was Increased later. A. The first aircraft of Cubans from Varadero, Cuba, airport (about. M mik-s from Havana) left Dec. 1 1905. Since Ihcn, two flights a day, five days a week, have brought about refugees lo Miami, leaving slill lo be brought, and nights continue. (Castro cul off requests of Cubans to come lo the U.S. after signed up.) The Cuban Refugee Center in Miami is manned with Ihc U.S. government fooling Ihc bill by Hebrew, Protestant and Catholic relief organizations, plus one non- sectarian group, the International Rescue Committee. Refugees are given a medical examination immediately, plus a supply of clothing and transportation to where a job has been arranged. They arc given welfare and other assistance on an individual-hy- individual basis, as the relief organizations determine Ihe need in each case. There never was a 5100-pcr-monlh paymcnl or any Mai sum of welfare money, Because of the heavy burden on the slates, particularly Florida, where one- fourth of the over-all total stayed, the U.S. government agreed to reimburse the stales for I heir loss on (he unemployment compensation, welfare and other costs. All cosl of Ihc Cuban refugee program in the current fiscal year totals about Sfl7 million for Uncle -Sam. Address qiiPSllons lo Action Line, Box 38 Abilene, Texas, 79SOI. Names will nnl he used hut fiuesllons must be signed and addresses given. By HARRY F. ROSKNT11A.L Associated Press Writer SPACE CKNTKIl, Houston (AP) James Lovell stepped briskly from the While Houso jet, paused briefly to smile hello and headed straight for a sia- lion wagon out of of Ihc. welcoming crowd. Inside was a frail lady, beam- ing. Lovell opened the door and brushed his lips against V.sr chuck. "Hello, he said. It's good lo see you." Only then was there lime for the wlio had come lo cheer Lovell, Fred liaise and Jack Swigcrt home. Home again. Back lo the home they thought they might never see again. Although their mission to land on the moon was not achieved, their return was a triumph. They'd had other welcomes: from Ihe swimmer who fii'il reached Ihcir capsule aliur splashdown Friday, on the car- rier Iwo Jima that brought them lo Samoa, from President and Ihcir families when they reached Honolulu. liul the welcome Sunday right from their Space Center com- inunUy was different. This is the place where they trained for man's third visit to the moon, an efforl Unvaried by an explosion. These were ihe people, who, by the thousands were totally committed lo bring them home. People Pkc flighl directors Cilynn Lunney and Milton Win- dier on whose many critical de- cisirns their lives depended; like Deke Slnylon, their immedi- ate boss: like fellow astronauts who worked out bugs on the ground before they could devel- op into more trouble in space- There were Ihe officials who run things. There were Mission Control personnel. But there were, too. the chil- dren from Ihc astronauts' bnrhoocis of El Lngo and Timber Cnvc. Kvcrywherc there were kids-the Space Center kids learn about thrust and apngce before Ihcy finish Ihc rlpiiahci. 5 Children Drown in Lake UMAT1LLA, Fla. (AP) Mrs. J. B. Simmons said she stepped onl of Ihe house lo call her children in for lunch and saw a small hand, rising out of Lake DOIT. Five of. her six children were in tlie lake, drowned. Neighbors recovered the bod- ies ol Linda, 5, Lisher. 6, Mary Liza, fl, .lack, 11 and 13. Their brother, Clarence, 7, was visiting with neighbors at Ihe time of Saturday's tragedy. There were no witnesses. Seven children and llircc ad- ul's drowned in Hie same lake while fishing years ago. By HOW Ann BENEDICT AP Aerospace Writer SPACK CENTER, Houston 13's S3trnnr.uls to- day began telling specialists happened on' llieiv near- tragic space riiglil, a journey they feared Ihcy rr'ght not sur- vive. After a joyous homecoming Sunday nighl, .lames A. Lovell Jr., Fred Haisc Jr. and John L. Swigcrl Jr. mot early today wilh .Space Center oiiicials. The first debriefing session started at 8 a.m. CST and con- centrated on events leading up lo the April 13 oxygen tank c.x- plos'nn that placed Ihe astro- nauts' lives in The Missib Decisions U. S. at WEATHER U. S DEPARTMENT Of CO.VMCRCE. ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wralr.er pg. 7 B] ABI1ENE AND VICINI1 YUO-mi'e lo parCY cloudy MoixJay, (iiy n'qhl ard Tuesday. Cooler Tuesday High 7B. Low Wcrwlav rishl SO. H'gli Tuesday 70. Wir.ds so-lhrrlv from 10-17 m p h. Hig1! ard for crdinq 9 a.m. 71 .inrl 53 Hioh ar.d low lor same period lail year n ar.d It. Sinscr rTighl: S'jnriH today: sunsel ronghl: KliW YORK (AP) Secre- tary of Defense Mclvin K. Laird said today "we arc literally at the of prudent risk" in postponing decisions on major new offensive nuclear weapons to give U.S.-Russian arms limi- tation talks maximum chance for success. Claiming a sleadily rising Russian missile threat, Laird said that "if the Soviet strategic offensive buildup continues, the risk to our nation will become loo great lo fuslain without ma- jor offsetting actions." In a major speech prepared fur the 70lh annual meeting of the Associated Press, the Penta- gon chief expressed hope for success al Ihe slralcgic arms limilation which hiive just opened a hard-bar- gaining phase in Vienna. Laird rejected arguments thai Ihc United Stales should, al Ihs oulsel of the negotiations, unilaterally hold up impending deployment of multiple inrto- pcndcn'.ly targelable warhead missiles (MlHVs) and expan- sion of the Safeguard missile (ABM) .system. "The place lo resolve these issues is at Ihe conference table wilh the he said. "Let us try to find ou'. al Ihe conference table the meaning of the Soviet Union's increased weapon deployments and kl us conduct these important nego- tiations with full recognition of these continuing Soviet deploy- ments." Laird said Ihe risks in defer- ring "hard decisions" on wheth- er to go ahead wilh advanced missiles and bombers arc ac- ceptable only if the United Slates proceeds Ihc long- planned MIHV deployment and ivhiil he called a "minimal addi- lo the Safeguard system, as proposed this year by the administration. Disputing critics who contend MIRV and AllM systems spur Ihe arms race, Laird asserted these weapons are essential to preserve the U.S. nuclear force that deters Russian ABM by saving land-based U.S. missiles and bombers from sur- prise knockout and Ihe M1HV by assuring lhat land-based and missiles Former Dominican Chief Found Dead Abortion Backer Loses Endorsement Hy WILLIAM MORRISSEY AURURN, N.Y. (AP) The stale assemblyman whose vole earlier this monlh assured en- actment of one of Ihc most lib- eral abortion laws in Ihe nation has been denied endorsement for rc-clcctinn by the Democrat- ic Coramitlee of the heavily Ro- man Catholic county in which he lives. Five limes since 1960 Assem- blyman George M. Michaels was endorsed by the Cayuga County Democratic Committee, and five limes he won election to the legislature. Michaels is a Jew. Sunday night, Michaels was dci'eatrd" for endorsement 72 to 4.1 by a fellow Auburn attorney, John Rossi. "I fully appreciate that this may bo ihe end of my political had lold, his Assembly colleagues April 9 as he switched his vole on Ihe abortion qucslion from a no lo a yes. His affirmative vole brought abortion tally lo 75-73 in fa- and paved the. way for As- sembly Speaker I'crry U. Hur- yea Jr. lo cast the deciding bal- lot. Duryea, who as speaker dnes not normally vole, had an- nounced in advance he would vote for the abortion bill if his ballol was necessary lo achieve the 76 needed for passage. Michaels said after the meet- ing Sunday he probably would enter the parly primary despite County committee's denial of emlnrstmcnl. Mis trirl is composed of Cayuga and' Corlland counties and last week Ihc Corlland Counly Democratic Committee voted to endorse him. i SANTO DOMINGO, Domini- can Republic (AP) Former Provisional President Hector Garcia Gndoy, a candidate in next month's presidential elec- tion, was found dead in his home today. Initial reports said he appar- ently died of a heart attack dur- ing Ihe night. Garcia Godoy, 49, was Ihe Do- minican ambassador lo fie United Slates until a few- months ago when he returned home to run in Ihe May 16 elec- tion lhal has stirred controversy in this Caribbean nation. He was the candidale of I tie Movement of National Concili- ation. A career diplomat, Garcia Go- doy w'as president in nine of most turbulent months in Ihc history of the Dominican Re- public. Ifc became president Sept. 3 1955 after ncgoliaiions between the Organization of American Stales and Ihe oppos- ing sides in the Dominican civil war at lhal lime. The fighting caused about deaths and led to the landing of U.S. Marines as well as troops from Brazil, Honduras, Costa Rica and Paraguay. Garcia Godoy led Ihe nation lo free elections, which wore won June 1, IfiSS, by .Inatimn Ralagucr, whoso presidential term is expiring this year. Aflcr Balaguor took office Garcia Godoy was named am- bassador, to Washington, Garcia Godoy served as for- eign minister for a brief pcriiHl under Ihe coup-shortened presi- dency of Juan liosch, a liberal. Before lhat he had served as ambassador to Britain and Bol- ghjni. can overwhelm formidable So- viel defenses. The defense scerelary said the United Stales seeks "iu morn Ilian a posture of effective deterrence" and lhat ''we ob- viously could recognize as legiti- mate a Soviet desire for a cmn- panible deterrent to protect its interests." However, he said that Russia for the past five years "has en- in a major effort lo change the balance of power" and added that "a clear strate- gic superiority Ihc part of ttie Soviet Union would affect onr inleresls and our obligations throughout the world." Since he said, "The Unit- ed Slates has virtually been in neutral gear in the deployment of strategic offensive forces, while the Soviet Union has moved inlo high gear in both de- ployment and development of strategic nuclear weapons." From to 1970. Laird said, Russia has more Ilian tripled its arsenal of long-range nudcar weapon launchers from aboul 500 to aboul What Ihc astronauts report r.vy help pinpoint I be cause of the' accident which aborted UIKM'S third moon-landing at- tempt. A '.cam of ex- perts here continued ,lo search lor clues in radio data and lopraphs returned by (he space- men. On Tuesday, Hie astronauls will mcel wilh representatives of a high level review board named to probe the mishap. Lovell, Haisc and Swigcrt re- tnrncil lo their hnmrs near Ihe Space C'enler Sunday nighi ;ifier a flight from Honolulu. They w'jR1 greeted by more tlinn 5.GOO persons who gathered at nearby Islington Air Force Base. Lovell lold Ihe crowd: "Needless lo say, Jack and Fred and I arc very proud and glad lo be back here in Texas tonight bccauce there were inai-y times when we really didn't think we'd make it back here. "And I can say with all sin- (he Apollo commander added, "we would rot be here if il was nol for the people on the ground, in Mission Control Cen- ter, helping us all the way." liaise said, "We had (be pray- ers and good from peo- ple all over Ihe world and we appreciated that very much." mm INDEX Bridge........... Classified 9 Ccmics Editorials.............. horoscope? hjspitol Polienls........ Obiluaries Sooris 10, To Your Good Hcollh TV Lrq............ 2A 9 A -123 83 63 58 7A MA 9A I2B 2.3B Holds e in JORGE CANICLAS Associated I'rcss Writer f.OGOTA. Colombia (AP) Kx-diclator Gustavo liojas held a slim lend Indr'.y in a seesaw halllo wilh of- ficinl candidate Misracl nn llorrcro for Ihe presidency of Colombia. A few minutes as Hie final results trickled in, Pastra- na, backed by Ihe ruling Nation- al Front, had moved briefly inlo Ihc lead. For much of Ihe morning, however, liojas had appeared Ihe victor, thanks lo divisions in the Conservative-Liberal coali- tion formed 1.1 years ago lo end his dictatorship. As the gap narrowed, Rnjas lo'd suppnrlcrs that liny r-'irl be vigilant, "because the gov- ernment is going to rob the elec- tion." "He ho warned. Pastrana said he was wailing for "definitive" results. Fears arose lhat a defeat for Tiojns on the basis of govern- ment figures would touch off disorders in Colombia. The unofficial tabulation, wilh per cent of the vote counted, showed the 70-year-old re- lircd general ahead of Pastrana by 24.00D votes. Rojas had voles. Pastrana moderate leftist Rcli- sario Betaucur 55S.HW and righ- tist Fvrrislo Sourdis A victory for Rojas would be a major setback for the divided National Front and President Carlos Lleraz Rcslrcpo. Bo'.h RalP.ncur and Sourdis ran ns breakaway candidates from National Front. himscif prcsidenl-elccl for Ihe four-year Icrm starling Aug. 7 and sairt ho was elected because of resent- ment against "exploitation by the oligijchy." Government Minister Carlos Augnsto Noriega said Ihe gov- ernment would not accept the outcome "until the last vole is counted." He threatened broad- casters reporting Rojas' lead wilh legal action, saying: "Our dear broadcasting friends are giving information that is incx- acl." Hojas and Pastrana swapped the lead several times in early returns before Ihe ex-dictator to-k a steady edge. Rojns1 daughter, Maria Ele- na, 37, managed her father's po- litical comebark campaign on a populist platform promising to lower taxes, revalue tlic peso, infiiiin-', nnd nut'oiv.l'zc irporl trade. Pastrana, a former ambassa- dor lo the United Sla'cs and four limes a cabinet minister, promised lo continue President Moras' program of moderate economic and social reforms,   

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