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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 15, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                Dorter WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TH YEAR, NO. 300 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 15, 1970 -TWENTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS (IP) lOc DAILY-20c SUNDAY Astronauts In Better irits By HOWARD BENEDICT, AP Aerospace Writer SPACE CENTER, Houston (AP) Apollo 13's astronauts nursed their disabled spaceship back toward earth today, rationing vital water, oxy- gen pad power to keep the craft alive for a Fri- day yplaihdown in the Pacific Ocean. CHECK ON TROUBLED 14 lunar module pilot Edgar Mitchell, left, and the flight commander Alan Shcpard Jr., check Apollo 13 spacecraft at Mission Control, Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Tex., tonight. Shepard, Mitchell and Stuart Roosa are scheduled for the Apollo 14 moon flight in the fall. Photo via AP Wirephoto) Kosygin Tells Nixon Russia Ready to Help LONDON (AP) Soviet Premier Alexei N. Kosygin told President Nixon today that his government stands ready lo help rescue astronauts of Apollo 13 and dispatched two ships lo the Pacific area where the splash- down is expected, Tass said. The Soviet news agency dispatch from Moscow said Ihe Russian Akademician Itykoc liykachev and Novopolotsk had changed course at sea and were speeding toward the Fiji Islands. "We follow wilh concern Ihe [light of (lie spacecraft Apollo 13 in which failure developed, "Kosygin's message lo Nixon said. "1 would like lo inform you that the Soviet government instructed the civilian and military auDiorilies of llio Soviet Union to use all means to help rescue U. S. aslronauls. "On behalf of the Sovicl Union, 1 wish to express to you the hope that the courageous astronauts safely return lo earth." When Ihe order to change course was flashed from Moscow, one of (he ships was bound for New Zealand wilh a cargo of wool and the other for Australia wilh machines and other goods. Tnss said the two merchant ships had been diverted to the splashdown area "to do their utmost in helping recover the U.S. aslronauls." "Minister of Merchant Marine Timefci Gnzhenko informed Ihe ships' masters of the order of the Soviet The three spacemen and Mission Control Cen- ter appeared more confident with every pass- ing hour that Apollo 13 would make it safely home. But with two days to go it's still a potentially perilous journey, wilh the astronauts reduced lo de- pendence on the power and other resources of the at- tached lunar landing craft. Karly today liaise, slanding watch while his companions slept, reported a .slight venting of gas from the area of Ihc com- mand ship's service compart- ment, where the oxygen lank ruptured Monday. He also said he saw a four-inch piece of sil- ver-colored metal float away from the area. Mission Control said it didn't know whether this was connect- ed with the original rupture or whether it was something new. There was no concern because the service compartment1 no longer was needed. It will be jettisoned before re-entry and the command ship will fly through the earth's atmosphere on a separate battery and con- trol system designed for re-en- try and landing. Wilh 60 hours to go, Ihis was the situation in the lunar mod- ule Aquarius: power usage had been reduced from 17 lo 14 am- peres per hour, which would leave a reserve of MO amp hams al Ihe end of the mission. Later, Mission Control reported thai at times the hourly usage rale dropped lo 12.3 amps. lower power outflow also reduced Ihe water usage, and the aslronauts were con- suming 2.7 to 3.2 pounds an hour. The lolal water supply was 215 pounds. During periods of heavy electrical activity, such as engine firings, the wa- ter supply needed lo cool elec- tronics is increased lo five or more pounds an hour. JHssion Control told the astronauts they didn'l have to skimp on drinking water. were 44 pounds ot oxy- gen remaining. At a usage rate o[ .36 pounds an hour, the aslro- nauls had a 120-hour supply, a safely margin of 60 hours. per cent of Hie lu- nar module's maneuvering fuel remained, more than enough for normal activily. There also was considerable fuel led in the craft's main engine, which is lo be (ired Thursday for a slight course correction. A nagging problem was the buildup of carbon dioxide, n product of breathing, in Ihe spaceship. That's because Ihc command cabin's lithium hy- droxide filter system is not working and filters in the lunar vehicle must handle the load. Lovell reported the problem: "Our CO2 pr.-asure is gelling high. We had a caution and warning light. We've got lo rig up some way to use the lithium hydroxide canister." Mission Control said it was not alarmed. The carbon diox- ide warning light in Ihe space- ship is geared to come on when it reads 7.6 millimeters of car- bon dioxide. government to (his Tass said. A State Department spoksman said in Waslunglon on Tuesday lhal if assistance is needed from foreign counlrics, it will be sought through diplomatic chanels. Britain mobilized elements of Us fleet in two oceans to help in the recovery if needed. Six vessels of Ihe Royal Navy are sleaming toward Mauritius in Ihe Indian Ocean in case Ihe capsule touches down there. Two British frigates were also dispatched to an Atlantic ocea point south o[ Rio de Janeiro in case the splashdown oc- CIITTS there. Brazil's navy and air force also were alerted. In Rome, Ilalian Defense Minister Marie Tanassi placed Italy's armed forces on the alert in case Ihe astronauts land in the Mediterranean. In Pretoria, Prime Minister John Vorsler said South Africa stands ready lo give assistance in case Ihe spacecraft comes down off its shores. IEWSINDEX Amusements 4A Bridge 2A Classified.......... 10-14B Comics 9B Edilorids BB Horoscope............ IDA Hospital Patienls 2B Obituaries 3A Sporls To Your Good Hcollh___2A TV Log.............. 1 1 A Women's News 3E PARKING STRUCTUHB CKUMKLES The lop section of a two-slroy parking structure al Clarkson Hospital in Omaha, Neb., collapsed Tuesday, tumbling materials and cars onto the first level. Police said no one apparently was hurt. (AP Wirephoto) Bodies Float Down Mekong Police Official in Cambodia Counts 400 !ly T. JEFF WILLIAMS Assoc'atfd Press ffriler NEAK LEUNG, Cambodia (AP) The bailies of hundreds of Vietnamese floated down the Mekong River in southeast Cambodia today, many with their hands tied behind lliem. It appeared lo he. the biggest mass killing yet revealed in Cambo- dia. A police official al the Ncak Leung ferry crossing 3G miles southeast of Plniom Penh, the. Cambodian capital, said lie had counted 400 bodies this morning. Rut still they came, and more could be seen for a mile up Hie river, until it disappeared around a bend. The slench was overpowering, and passengers on the ferry gagged as the boat moved through Ihc bodies- Some women were among the slain but very few. Most were men clad only in black shorts. One group of eight bodies, in- cluding one woman, floated by tied together. Cambodians along the bank including the police said tlicy had no idea where the bodies came from. The government leaders who deposed Prince Norodom Sihan- ouk have been whipping up an anti-Viclnamesc campaign di- rected not only at the thousands of Viet Cong and North Viet- namese troops who operate back and forth across the bor- der with South Vietnam but at the Vietnamese who live in Cambodia. The Khmer people of Cambo- dia ami the Annamitcs of Viet- nam have been traditional ene- mies for centuries, and govern- ment planes dropped leaflets in Phnom Penh Saturday remind- ing the people of a historic mas- sacre when "the Khmcrs once rose up and killed all Arnamilcs on Cambodian territory in one night.'1 At least 7.1 Vietnamese who been rounded up in the town of Prasaut for security checks were killed there last Friday, and according lo available evi- dence Camtxxlian troops were the killers. On Saturday at least seven more Vietnamese were slwl by Cambodian troops just south of Kamoibg Trabrk, near Hie bor- der west of Prasaul. The Saigou government said today it was asking Cambodia to let a "people's delegation" from several cliarilablc agen- cies, cnler Ihe country and investigate accounls of'killing and other mistreatment of Viet- namese nationals. There was some belief (he bodies at Weak Leung noalcd down from Ihe area soulh of Koinpong Cham where large French rubber plantations have labor forces of Vietnamese. A number of Vietnamese vil- lages have been burned by Caiubortian troops claiming thai, the Vietnamese [led wilh the Viet Cong. Al leasl two Roman Catholic churches have been pil- laged and burned in predomi- nantly Vietnamese villages. Many ot Ihe Vietnamese are Catholics, while the Cambodians arc predominantly lluddhisls. Pope Paul VI has protested through the Catholic Church in Cambodia and expressed con- cern over (he fate of Ihe Catho- lic Viclnamese. About Vietnamese live in I'hnoni Penh, where they have slroug influence on Ihe economy through ownership of retail stores, restaurants and trading houses. Meanwhile, diplomats in Students to Hear Dallas Ace Back Dallas Cowboy all-pro running hack Calvin Hill, 1369 NFl- offensive rookie of the year, will spc.-ik at the lllh annual banquet honoring the top 50 seniors in (he Abilene public schools, April 30 at tlic Slarlile Inn. The announcement was made Wednesday by I.es Ellis, president of Southwest Abilene Rotary Club, which sponsors the banquet. Hill, known primarily for his athletic ability, was also an outstanding student al Yale University, where he was a deacon in Ihe sludent chapel. He is currently attending Perkins School of Theology at SMU. "Calvin Hill is a worthy addition to Ihe list of past speakers that includes astronaut John Swigert, Paul Harvey, Abigail Van Burcn, and Dr. Wornhcr Von Ellis said. Hill was a first-round draft HE Why Is Postman Not Taking Letters? By ELLIE RUCKEfl and BETTY GRISSOM Q. For years I have pinned my out- going Idlers on Ihc mall box. The post- man has always lakcn them lo (he post office If he came (o leave mall In our box. Now the same postman doosn'l lake my letters. I was told that they don't have to pick up (his mall, thai It's Jusl a courtesy of (he postman. Why doesn't the post ollice let ns know to slop pulling letters out lo he picked up? A. The postman is required lo pick up out- going mail if mail is being delivered lo your box or if it's a curb box with the flag up, says Kenneth Boss, superintendent of mail. That's one advanlagc of having a curb box. It's possible thai the mailman has more people on his route now and docsn'l have time lo stop for a pick up. If you are receiving mail withoul a pick up, complain lo Ihc post office officials, Q. What kind of charge can be Invoked upon someone breaking and entering an unattended building? Ann" should Ihe person he a minor, ean his parents be held liable. A. If breaking and entering is done wilh inlcnlion of committing a felony or (heft, an adult (male over 17 or female over 18) can be charged wilh burglary. Without such intent, the charge would be trespassing or destruction of private properly. This is a criminal action and if the intruder is under 17 (for girls it's under he may be de- clared a delinquent. Civil action may be brought against the parents of minors under 18 and over 10 years, if the minors malici- ously or wilfully damage or destroy proper- ty of another person, school, city, or etc. Q. Is K true thai a bill has recently hren passed for Increased bcnctlts to G. I. Rill recipients? Rumor holds that Die bill fias hrcn passed and (hat Ihc Increase will be relroaellve la Scp- Irmhrr, K the bill has passed, when will the Increased beKllls reach Ihe recipients? A. The bill was passed separately by the House and (he Senalc, wilh considerable dif- ference in the measures. The measure was referred to a conference committee on Jan. 26, 1970, lo work out a compromise. It now must be passed back through both the House and the Senate before it goes to the President for signature and become a public law. In its present form, most likely, il will become a law, says Walter B. Gnihhs, dis- trict manager lo Congressman Omar Burleson. The conference bill would be effective wilh the approximate slarl of Ihe present college semester, which would make il retroactive to I'cb. It will lake time to set up Ihc machinery and increase the checks, but veterans will be receiving the Increased amounts within a month or two. Q. I have a kllchei counter top that Is faded and stained. At the present lime I can't have a new lop put on. Is there ?ny paint that will adhere (o this surface satisfactorily be Hater proof? A. Kpoxy or liquid plastic paint will adhere to tile and formica and almost anything else that hasn't been previously painled, and may also be used to paint tub, sink, or lavatory. Before painting all holes must filled wilh wood dough, sanded, cleaned and be dry. This is an industrial pnxiucl (hat is being used more and more for domestic use and may be bought at most paint stores. 0. I nccrt (o know the dale, time, sla- diimi and town the Cleveland Indians play their ne.vl game. A. We nave mailed you a season schedule which indicates if games or day or night games. However, it doesn't give Ihe lime of Ihe games. The day games start at p.m. or at 1 p.m. if it's a double header. The doublc'ncadcr night games start at p.m. and regular games at p.m. Address questions (o Aclinn Mne, Box 30, Abilene, Texas, 73601. Names will not be used but questions must be signed and addresses given. CALVIN HFJJ, all-pro Cowboy choice in 1960 as an unknown, lie was an overwhelming selection as NFL offensive rookie of Ihe year. Hill was second in NFL rushing after leading most of the year before being injured. In prep school at Riversale, N.Y., he was a quarterback. In his senior year the team went undefeated. During his career at Yale he mshcd for yards, received for 858 yards receiving, and passed for Tickels cost for Ihe p.m. dinner and may be purchased from Southwest Rolarians or by calling Ihe club office, 673-1121. __________ ES5A WEATHER BUREAU (Wealhtr Map, PQ. ABILENE AND VICINITY (JD-mlle rad'us) Cloudy lo parity claudy and warm today, wim a ilighl chanct for Ihu'.wierslowerj ihii alEfrrnoon; (air and cooler a.-xJ Thursday. HHgh Ihis aflernoon, Aboul BO; low In TO'i. Soulherly winds al 10-20 m.p.h. today- bftominq northwesterly lon'ght Thursday. Probabihly oT rain Ihis alter neon, 73 per eenl. Ntgti ard low for erxffrg a.m.: 7] And 62. High and low (x sa-rw date las) year: 76 and 41. Sunset last nig hi: p.m. today; a.m. iuniel ton K) hi: jwn. Plinom Penh reported lhal Ihe Vicl Cong overran llirnc Cambo- dian army oulposls in southern Cambodia's Takoo Province during Ihc night, including a vil- lage wilh a Budrttrisl vcmple that was a tourist attraction. The temple is al Angkor Bone, about 50 miles south of Phnom Penh. Snyder Winner In Play Contest SNYDKIl Snyricr High School's one act play, "Elizabeth Ihe won first place Tuesday in district University Inlorsrholnstic League play competition. Best actress award went to Kathy Martin of Snyder for her role as Queen Elizabeth. Richard Privell of Brownlield won best, aclor for his inter- pretation ot Petruchio in "Taming of the Shrew." The winning play was directed by Jerry Worsham, head of the drama department at Snyder High School. I.amcsa took second place with Ihe presentation of "The Mannequin's Demise" by David W. Biidhill. Brownfield and Estacarto tied for third place. The all-star cast includes Joe Wilson of S n y tl o r, Darla Copelanrt of Estacado, Paul Rioey of Lamesa, Mike Worncr of Gray Ten-ell of Snyder and Jeana King of Brownfield. Judge of the competition was George Sorenson, H a r d i n- Simmons University drama director. Bayh Offers No Opinion on Judge CLEAN, N.Y. (AP) Sen. Birch Bayh who was in the forefront of the successful Senate opposition to two of President Nixon's Supreme Court nominees, said Tuesday night he had "no opinion1' on the third. NEED CASH? Look around the house and garage for those items that you no longer use. Sell them In the Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Davs Wo Exlensicn w Rtfur.d 31 This Rilt Approxrmalelr 15 Average No Phone Orders Please Only CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M.   

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