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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 7, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 7, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gtoflene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TH YEAfl, NO. 292; PHONE -673-4271 ABILENEj 79G04, TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 7, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS 1- Measles Put Apollo 13 on Spot Blood Tests to Determine If Trip to Be Delayed Associated Prcu 10c 20c SUNDAY By HOWARD BENEDICT CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (AP) The Apollo 13 crew practiced descending lo Ihc moon today while medical specialists hur- ried blood lesls to determine if the astronauts' exposure to Ger- man measles is going to delay (lie ?375 million mission a month. The space agency said il ex- peeled a report on the measles investigation late today or early Wednesday. James A. Lovell Jr., Thomas K. Mallingly II and Fred W. liaise Jr. wcnl ahead with their normal training schedule as if they were going In lake off for Hie moon Saturday on schedule. Wilh Lovell and liaise aboard a lunar landing craft simulator and Maltingly in a command ship trainer, they rehearsed (lie separation of the lander and its desccnl toward the lunar sur- face. The astronauts have been ex- posed lo German measles, usually a childhood ailment, through one of their backup pi- lots, astronaut Charles Duke, who broke out in a rash Sunday. If tcsls show the immunity of any of the three is low, their chief physician probably will re- commend that the launching be delayed a month. Even if Ihcir immunity is high, doctors will be faced with a lough decision. There is no medical experi- ence in the progress o[ such a disease in a spacecraft onviron- ment. Dr. Charles A. Berry, medical director for Houston's Manned Spacecraft Center, said: "We certainly would he concerned about launching them if there Iraqi-American Still Clings To Customs of Old World LA MKSA, Calif. (AP) Frank Najor was 15 when he left Iraq to find his fortune in America. In March, 2G and wealthy, he went to Beirut lo marry a girl he's never seen. "I'm a lucky gambler, I guess." he said after returning (his week with Manal, his 17- year-old bride. Najor, a carpenter's son with only seven years of schooling, arrived in 1959 with his brother Antwan, 18, from Ihe northern Iraqi town of Telkief. They settled in San Diego and bought a tiny grocery store. They expanded il and bought another in neighboring El Ca- jon. Today they also own a 22- unit apartment house. The boys brought their par- ents over in 1365, the year Frank became a naturalized U.S. citizen. Meanwhile, their married sis- ter Najea, living in Beirut, was worrying that Frank worked so hard and was a bachelor. Najea wrote thai llanal was from a good family and with a personality much like Frank's. No photographs were ex- changed, and Najor and Manal did nol write lo each olher. An airplane brought Manal and her parents to Beirut from Iheir home in Baghdad the day before the Roman Catholic cere- mony was performed Jlarch 25 in a Beirut church. said Manal. said Frank. On Ihe airliner flighl home, lie telephoned his brother AnUvnn. "It's said Frank. "We're in love already." Florida School Head Takes Back Control By ERIC SHARP Associated Press Writer BRADENTON, Fla. (AP) Dr. Jack Davidson said today he had wrested control of Mana. tee County schools back from Gov. Claude Kirk and that his staff will act as quickly as pos- sible lo carry out. federal de- segregation orders. "I have taken over and as- sume the governor will not re- sisl Ihe courl order said Davidson, suspended lem- porarily by Kirk as superintend- ent of schools Sunday. Kirk was ordered by U. S. District Court Judge Den Krentzman lo appear in Tampa court this afternoon to show cause why he should not be hold in contempt Tor taking over the schools to block the desegrcga- A Capella Tour MARSHALL, Tex. 29-member A Cappella Choir of East Texas Baptisl College will perform six concerts in church- es from Gladewaler to Beau- mont on (heir Spring lour April 8-12. WEATHER U. f. DEP4RTMENT OF COMMERCE ES5A WEATHER BUREAU IWtillttr Mlp, P9. 7A) ABILENE AND VICINITY rftdius) Talr and warm today; parlly cloudy Icflighl ard Wednesday. High loday, nfar B5; Icrff tonighl, near to; higfi WcdMsday, near 75. Soulrrtrly wirwls, aro-jpd 10 m.p.h. Higti ind low lor 74-hours ending 9 31 ind Hhjh and Tow same dale lasl year: to ird'H. Sunsel lajl niqhl: sunrise loday: sunset lorJgM: lion plan, ordered into effect Monday. Wilh Kirk in Tallahassee lo address the opening of the Flori- da Legislature al noon, David- son showed up at his adminis- trative offices to confer with Kirk aides, Dr. William.Meloy and Dick Warner, and Betty Rushmore, president of Ihe school board. "Our purpose is lo come here to follow Ihe directives of the court order and lo begin to im- plement the desegregation pro- gram Ihe 42- year-old educator told newsmen afler Ihe meeting. Asked why he look Ihe aclion loday rather lhan Monday, Da- vidson replied: "I assumed yes- lerday thai (he suspension was legal. Since Judge Krenlzman has issued Ihe court order, I feel we must follow lhal." Davidson said he would meet with his staff later in Ihe morn- ing to sec "what has been done and what must be undone." He said (he staff would move as quickly as possible lo carry out the desegregation decree and hoped the judge would real- ize il might take a day of two lo shift books and second shift in a week. Davidson said he was asking Meloy to remain in Bradenlon as an observer and to "lell me what at they did with my furni- ture ycslerday." It look the school system three days to prepare for the de- segregation program aborted Monday. Davidson said an altempt would be made to reach Kirk in Tallahassee by telephone. was a possibility they could de- velop the disease during the mission. II certainly could dis- able them during the flighl." It the launching is postponed, Lovell, Mallingly and liaise would have lo wail a monlh for their mnon Irip. Saturday is the only favorable KTunch day in April lor their intended landing area in Ihc Kra Maurc High- lands. The next opportunity is May 3. Delay would be costly. When the Apollo 3 launch was poneri three days last yewr be- cause of aslronSUl colds, the space agency estimated the ex- Ira cost of Ihe mission al Disclosure that Duke had Ger- man measles, known medically as rubella, was made Monday. He hcftl reported his conrtilion to inrdical authorities Sunday night. Officials said it was nol known how or when Duke was exposed. Berry said Lovell, liaise and Maltingly had been in close con- tacl with Duke (or several days, as had the other two backup pilots, John Young and John Ij. Swigort Jr., while the crews were segregated at their Cape Kennedy headquarters. Out the prime crew continued to practice in spaceship simula- tors, following a schedule thai assumes a launching Saturday. IiOvcll, through his 4-year-old son Jeffrey, also was exposed tost week to the more infectious red mcrfslcs. Immunity tests also were being made tor this variety. Not Ducking Responsibility Tommy Sullivan of suburban Memphis, Tcnu., had two young ducks, bul one died. The survivor, was lonely, at first, but then struck up a friend- ship with another Sullivan family pet, a big boxer. Kelly now lias as- sumed Ihe role of father and proledor lo the duckling. (AP Wircplioto) Mid-Morning Vote Here Termed Slow by Most A survey of city voting places between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Tuesday showed lhal Abilenians voted in today's cily council race during Ihe early hours. Both races are contesled. Howard .Caver, Bob llunler, and Joe Leal are running for Ihe northsidc position. Mrs. Amelia Aguirre and Dr. Gordon Bennett are running for the southside post. The is out of voter potential of more lhan Senate Elevator Dispute Loaded With Ups and Downs By BOB POOS Associated Press Wrilcr WASHINGTON (AP) Sena- tors naven'l been polled yet. No one knows which way the un- committed lean. Bul the issue is being lalked about and il could hursl into Ihe open at any mo- ment. Elevators. The three, high- speed, modern gleaming chrome elevators in the New Senate Office Building. Sen. Milton U. Young, R-N.D., got stuck in one of them the olh- er day. lie picked up Ihe emer- gency phone and spcnl several minules trying lo convince a giggling secretary he really was stuck. But Ihis isu'l Ihe issue. A couple thousand people go through the building every day. But these three elevators can only be used by 101 taxpayers, thai is, Ihe senators and Vice President Spiro T. Agncw who has one of his offices there. Although there are six other elevators, the public is effec- tively restricted to two old and slow lifts near the three new ones just off the subway from the Capitol. Some senators seem uncom- fortable aboul the whole thing. Sen. Frank Moss, D-Utah, wrote a Idler of protest (o Ihe Senate majority and minority leaders and other colleagues. The con- tents of the letter could nol be disclosed, a Moss staff member said. However, "it was strongly worded and urged that the mat- ter be straightened out." A staff member of Ihe Senate Rules Committee, responsible for elevator adminislration, says, "Il's a knolty problem Naturally Ihcy like the idea of being able lo get lo and from Iheir destinations quickly. "But most of them don't like the idea of approprialing for only a few individuals Ihe bulk of Ihe available elevators, espe- cially leaving the old, slow he said. "We're trying to work il he added. The survey includes only one of the Ihrce peak voting times, Ihe before-work hours. Olher peaks are expected al noon and afler work. Election judges termed the early lurnoul average lo slow I'D disappoinling. No precinct had chalked up 175 voles by the time (hey were surveyed. Three precincts had voted more lhan 160. Mrs. J. T. lilanlon said 52 had voted al Ihe First Slate Bank, which she said was a "pretty average lurnoul.' She said (here wore 447 there in Saturday's school voling. L. R. Lapham said 87 had voled at Rose Park by 10 a.m. out of a potential of lo Bert Chapman said 165 had voled around at Ihe Boy Seoul Building. He said il was a "pretty good vote, coming Early Totals PREC1NT 1'LACF. A, First Stale Bank H, Hose Park C, Boy Scout Bldg. D, Pioneer BaplisL E, Health Unit F, Cily Hall ACC Fire Stn. H, Immanuel Baptist I, Cobb Park .T, YMCA Absentees TOTALS n A.M. TOTALS 52 87 165 120 7.ri S8 ion 88 164 nn prelly steady" and lhal he ex- pected about in all. Dalton Moore Jr. saiil 120 had voted in hours al Pioneer Baptist Church. Voting 50 an hour would mean a total of GOO, Moore said, which is "very slow." He said there should bo lo voters there. Dennis Jlanly said ICO had voled at Ihe Health Unil, a "prelly slow lurnoul." He said he'd hoped to get 750 during (he day. Raymond Wolfe said 75 had voled al Cily Hall, which was "prclly fair for this type o( election at this type of day." Wolfe was one of Ihe few who said there were significantly more volers from minority races. One of Iwo olhers said (here were a few more lhan usual bul nol onougli lo be of significance. Olhers said there was no more minority lurnout or thai they hadn't noticed. Ted Pills said 98 voled al the ACC Fire Station which was "running about right." He said he expected as many voters in the last hour of voling (6 p.m. lo 7 p.m.) as had voted Ihe resl of Ihe day. T. N. Carswcll said Ihc 100 lurnoul al IinmaniiH Baptist Church was "very disappointing, slower lhan usual." Robert Springer said 88 had voted al Cnbb Park, "a litlle slow but not remarkably." George Gray saiil the 164 lurnout at the Y.MCA was "very slow" out of a polcnlial. TWA Pilot Calms Man Wilh Gun PITTSBURGH (AP) For more than a quarter of an hour, pilnl John Hybee of Trans World Airlines flew his boeing 707 while Hltempling lo calm a nervous young man who stood behind him waving a gun. "lie was very disoriented and nol al all sure what he wanled lo said Bybce, 42, of Dan- ville, Calif., when il was all over Monday. He said Ihe gunman apparently thought the San Francisco lo Pittsburgh flight was bound for Boston and he "definitely did nol wanl lo go lo Boston." Byuce said the man, identified by the Fill as Lynn L. Lillle, 22, of McKcesporl, Pa., forced his way into the cabin while Ihc plane was over western Nebras- ka. "lie was nervous and waving Ihc gun Bybee said. "We calmed him by telling him we would go to Piltsburgh. He seemed lo have Ihc impression someone was out lo gel him and kill him. We lold him we'd let him out Ihe back, of Ihe plane so whoever il was wauln'l harm him. "Ho finally believed we were really going to Pittsburgh and put Ihe gun in his pocket. Then lie finally gave me the gun and 1 secreted il in Ihe cabin where he couldn't find il again." Bybce said Ihe other 59 pas- sengers on the plane were una- ware of what was happening in the cockpit. "When we landed, we told him we would wait for all the passengers to deplane antl lhal way (he chances of him being accosted were Ihe pi- lol said. FBI agents then entered Ihe plane and look Ihe gunman inlo custody wilhout further inci- dent. NEWS INDEX Amusements 4A Bridge 9A Classified............5-8B Comics 4B Editorials 10A Horoscope............ 12A Hospital Patients........7A Obiluaries.............2A Snorts 8.9A This Man's Arl .........4A To Your Good Health------88 TV Log 9A Women's News.........3B 1IATTLEI) SUSPECT Dan Schwartz, 40, of Chicago, emerges from a hospilal in Newhall, Calif., where he was treated for injuries he received in a scuffle with a man suspected of shooting (our Calif- orniia Highway Patrol officers to death. Schwartz, was asleep in his camper Iruck when Ihe man fired inlo it, then pistol whipped him. In an exchange of shots, the suspect was wounded twice and was ciipliircd a short while laler. Slory on Pg. 3A. (AP Wircpholo) By ELLIE RUCKKIl and BKTTY CRISSOM Did Churches Here Refuse Flood Help? Q. You have Ignored Ihe question; U Is a public you answer? Is II Irnc Unit In disaster conditions (such as we had In Ahllcnrj during the Itood In the AVoortson area) lhal large churches with kllchens refused to house and feed people had been evacuated from Ihcir homes and had no place to go? This is Ihc rumor going around, fact or fallacy? Ask the CAP, they will know. Until I knnw I will continue (o hclicvc (he church a heartless, needless beau- tiful building. Docs Iruih hurt column? A. No ma'am, bul making endless calls lo every church in Abilene searching for your answer would sure hurt our ears. Bul here's what we found: there appar- enlly was a duplication of efforts during the flood. One large church opened its facilities for housing and had food prepared for the evacuees; Ihe Red Cross also had set up facilities in Woodson High School. Since Wnodsnn was closer, people went there and the church was notified their facilities wouldn't he needed. It sounds as though the Irulli may be jusl (he opposite of what you heard. Joe Ramon, head of CAP, says he can't imagine how lhal rumor gol started; he's never heard of il. Frank Mason, president of NAACP, knows of no case where churches refused people. lien Aguirre, director of CAP centers, says, "It was beautiful the way Ihe community came lo and he doesn't know of any church that refused help; in fact, he said, many came to their aid with donations of new shoes and clothing. Q. I have a question on teeth! Is there a dentist In this town thai can make Ihc implant type of artificial teeth? I gag on any of those parlials, I've tried for several years and need lo have some nmrc replaced Mh'ch I don'l look forward lo. A. There are a few dentisls in other areas who are doing this, but the process is not widely used as il's quite new and dentists here say it is slill in the experimental stage. Oral surgeons in Abilene have had requests for Ihis and may do il eventually, but are not doing it now. Q. Will you find onl something thai will fake (he body oil from a man's shirt collar and cuffs other (ban rubbing vigorously with soap and wafer? Also grease spots on solid material. A. Rub shampoo or liquid detergent inlo Ihe oily spols; shampoo removes oil belter than soap and liquid detergent is more effective than powder detergent, says County Home Demonstration Agenl Roberta Waters. Use this as a prc-trcalmcnt before laundering. If (his doesn't work, afler you launder Ihe garment rub chalk or talcum powder inlo the slains; both of these absorb grease. Address questions (o Action Line. Box 30, Ahllcne, Texas, 796M. Names will not be uscrl bul questions must be signed ard addresses given. There Is Still Time to Vote; Polls Open to 7   

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