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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 6, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 6, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 09TH YEAR NO. 291 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79C04, MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 6, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Press (IP) lOc SUNDAY Gunman Has Hostage After 4 Officers Slain By MIKE RUBIN Associated Press Writer SAUGUS, Calif. (AP) Four patrolmen were shut falally Sunday night while investigat- ing reports of two men brand- ishing guns at motorists on a mountain highway. Sheriffs deputies started a Mansfield Sees Okay For Carswell By JOHN CHADW1CK Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) As the Senate neaved a crucial vote today on the nominalion of G. Harrold Carswell !o the Su- preme Courl, 'Democratic Lead- er Mike Mansfield said it looks ss though the judge will he con- fiimed. The Montana Democrat, slill declining to say how lie will vote, had previously rated the outcome of the hard-fought bat- tle over the Tallahassee, Fla., jurist's nomination a toss-up. But today's vote was not on confirmation uul on whether to send the nomination back to the Judiciary Committee, and Cars- well supporters appeared to have victory on that important issue within their grasp. An Associated Press poll prior to the start of today's Senate session showed 49 senators op- posing the recommilal motion, 39 for and 10 uncommitted. Mansfield told 'newsmen that it looks to him as though the Senate not only is "leaning a lit- lle toward Carswell" on the test vote but also on confirmation. II the recommilal motion fails, the Senate is to vote Wednesday on confirmation of Carswell, a Slh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judge whose nomination was submitted by President Nixon on Jan. 19. "I imagine the vote on return- Ing it to committee will be the precursor to the vote on Mansfield said. Newsmen asked him if he meant he expects Carswell to be confirmed. "Yes, that's the way il looks at Ihe Mans- field replied. Senate Republican Leader Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania reit- erated he is confident that Ihe recommilal motion will be re- jected and that Carswell will be confirmed. search for Ihe two gunmen and as they did so one of the men entered a nearby house and look a father hostage. The man Ihen stalled firing at the more than 100 officers sur- rounding Ihe house, officials said. They identified him as Jack Wright Twinning, 35, who said lie held Steve lloag captive. Mrs. Hoag escaped from the house and their son, Jeff, was sale in an outbuilding bedroom. Because of the hostage, offi- cers outside held their fire as deputies with bullhorns ordered I'.iin to surrender. One deputy quoted Twinning as shouting: "I'll be dead if I walk out." The other man wanted in the slaying surrendered himself about an hour earlier to electric power station employes about five miles away. He was idenli- fied as Itusscll Talbert,   Wlreplmln) SHERIFF'S DEPUTY SAM WHITE EXAMINES THREE PISTOLS weapons were found at scene of California slayings_________________ 28. Deputies said both were wanted in connection with the slaying of a federal officer in Oregon. Mrs. Hoag told deputies that Twinning knocked on Iheir door at a.m., demanding Ihe family car. When il was offered, she said, the gunman changed his mind and took Hoag captive while she slipped out. Officers said one suspect was believed severely wounded in the original Shootout. Wilh two patrolmen deaid and one mortal- ly wounded, the .last officer had held off the two gunmen alone for five minutes until he was hit by a shot in the face, a witness said. The men fled in their red, late-model sedan as 40 cuslom- crs in a nearby coffee house huddled on the floor. A car of that description was found about 10 minutes later on a dead-end street about a block from the shooling scene. Three helicopters and more than 100 law enforcement offi- cers on foot and in four-wheel- drive vehicles scoured the nigged, brush-covered hill and canyon area in search of the as- sailants. The patrolmen had stopped the gunmen's car after reports thtfi Iwo men in a red car had been pointing guns at motorists along the Golden Slate Freeway and had Iried lo force some cars off the road. No shots were re- ported in those incidents. One witness, among four young persons in a car towing a boat, said he was '-standing in the parking lot and.saw a Cali- fornia Highway Patrol slop a red car with Iwo fellows in it. The slain patrolmen were idpnlified as Waller C. lioger D. Gore, 22; James ICdward Pence Jr., 25, and George M. Alleyn, 24. All were married and lived in nearby communities. Light Turnout Seen in City Election Indicators point to a light turnout in Tuesday's cily council election in Abilene, with polls at 10 voting places open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Seeking to replace John Stevens as norrhside city council man arc Joe Leal, Howard Caver and Bob Hunter. Running for Arch Batjer's soutlisidc post are Dr. Gordon Bennett and Mrs. Amelia Aguirre. (Voting Map, Pg. 3-A) Abilene Jaycees and Jayce- etlcs will provide riiles lo Ihe polls. They may be contacted at 677-5721. About are cligile to vote, plus residents living near Fort Phantom Lake in Jones County who wouldn't be reflec- ted in Taylor County rcgis- Gov. Kirk Takes Over School BRADENTON, Fla. (AP) Gnv. Claude Kirk, directing pupils and leachers to ignore desegregation transfer ap- proved by Ihe U.S. Supreme Court, today personally as- sumed "custodial supervision" of the Manatee County public school system. Kirk called his action "in the bc.sl interest of the children." In an executive order Sunday, Kirk acled 14 hours before the desegregation plan was to be implemented in Manatee, if coastal counly on the Gulf of Mexico 50 miles soulh of Tam- pa. On [he scene before classes opened, Kirk huddled briefly be- hind closed doors with IJ. Gov. Ray Osborne and two assistant superintendents, Col. Philip Doyle and Dr. William Bashaw. Then addressing some 150 ad- minislrcflivc staff members, Kirk said: "We have exercised every legal opportunity possible with Ihe Manatee Counly School Board. We will now exercise our rights as governor. "Our job is to educate chil- dren." He added that the federal judges who ordered desegrega- tion were not concerned with this. "There will be no Kirk said. "1 see no problems. I see a great staff." "My main interesl is in keen- ing the schools running and in keeping the children in school. The legal ramificalions are sec- ondary. "We have come this way re- luctantly. We have not been giv- en our day in court. We imagine we will be given our day in court now." Doyle said results of Kirk's action wouldn't be known until midmorning. (ration figures. ABSENTEE totals, the turn- out for Saturday's school board vote, mild interest in some of the candidate speeches, a lack of controversial issues, and even leltcrs-to-the edilor, seem to indicate a large number of these won't vole Tuesday. There were 90 absentee voles cast in the city races. Almost double that number voted absentee in Saturdays' school election, and there were votes cast. However, voters are not expected to have to contend with Saturday's chilly 40-degree weather, and there should be more voters at home on a weekday than a weekend. The DO absentees are less than "WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wealher Map, Pg. 1CA) ABILENE AND VICINITY [40-milt ra- Fa fr and warm today through Tuesciay. High bolh dirernoons, around 75 degrees; low Iw.kjhl, rear 50. S-10 m.p-h. HTgh and for ending 9 B.m.: H and 41. _ Hkj1! and low sarr.c date year: 77 "sunioi lasl nighl: loday; sunwl lon'-ghl: the 123 cast last year when a mayor and Iwo councilmen were elected in lwo contested races. The number is much heavier [nan the 49 absentees in 1968 when two couneJlmen were elected in contested races, however. No major controversial issues have been raised by the candi- dates and Ihe race has been rather quiet. CANDIDATES have spoken to a number of civic, political, and church groups. Turnout for some of Ihese was extremely small. There's also been less lhan the usual number of letters-lo-the- edilor in this campaign. Caver, a Negro, and Mrs. Aguirre and Leal, Mexican- Americans, both hope to become the first representatives of Iheir races on the council. Mrs. Aguirre would also be the first woman- Bennett and llunler are Ihe Citizens for Better Government candidates. A win for either or both would mean the council again will have a majority of members who were CBG- sponsored. -7 DR. SAM SHEPARD more than flu br. Sheppard Dies in Ohio COLUMBUS, Ohio Sam Shcppard, former Cleveland osteopath who was convicted and lalcr acquitted of killing his first wife, died at his home nere today. His third wife, Colleen, .said cause of death was not immedi- ately learned. "He died here at she said. "He had the flu for several days and apparently it was more than Ihe flu but we didn't know this. "He was half asleep and half awake. He was jusl in delirium and died at about 7 a.m." She said no doctor had seen Sheppard during the illness. "He wouldn't let us call she said. "He got sick two days no really three days ago. We have no idea what caused the 'Dr. Robert (A. Evans, Frank- lin County. Coroner, said Shcp- pard had been treating himself lor flu. He wbuld nnl comment, on the cause .of death. Sheppard, 45, had been living at Ihe residence of his fatlicr- in-law, B. L. Strickland since last summer. Shcppard started about a year agn wrestling for charitable events and Strickland was his manager and wrestling partner. He married Strickland's daughter, Colleen, 20, on Oct. 21 in Mexico. Shcppard first made national news on July 4, 1954 when his pregnant first wife, Marilyn, was found brutally beaten lo death in Iheir plush Bay Village, Ohio, home just west of Cleve- land. Shcppard was convicted of sec- ond-degree murder in a widely publicized and controversial trial and was sentenced.to life imprisonment. Shcppard spent nearly 10 years in the Ohio Penitentiary while fighting his conviction. A U.S. District Court ordered his re- lease on July 16, 1964. The U.S. Supreme Court ordered him freed on June 6, 1966 and ruled the state could try him again within a reasonable time. At his second trial in Cleve- land, defended by attorney F. Lee Bailey, Sheppard was ac- quitted on Nov. 16, 1966. NWS INDEX Amusements.......... 4A Bridge 8A Classified 8-1IB Comics 73 Ediloriols........---------AB Horoscope.............9A Hospital Patients.......1 OA Obituaries............. 3A Sports 1X-16A To Your Good Health .....58 TV Log MB Women's News..........3B W. Germans to Recall Guatemala Envoy (AP COUNT VON SPRCTI shot In the head ny PETER REHAK Associated Press Writer BONN GERMANY (AP) Foreign Minister Waller Scheel said today West Germany will recall its embassy staff from Guatemala, as indignation mounted here over the terrorist killing of Count Carl von Spreti, kidnaped ambassador. Scheel told a news conference the Bonn government was forced lo act because "the gov- ernment of Guatemala" appar- enlly is not in a position.-.lo guarntcc the safety of Ihe i'cp- rcscntalivcs of the (West Ger- man) Federal Republic." Scheel said other measures may follow as a result of von Sprcti's murder. He said the government would study reports from Gerhard Mikcsch ils charge d'affaires in Guatemala, and Wilhelm Hoppc, chief of personnel of (he Foreign Minis- Iry who was sent lo Guatemala Saturday to try to arrange for von Spreti's release. Scheel also indicated lhat Gualemala's srnbassador to Bonn, Antonio Gandara, will be asked lo leave West Germany. have decided lo with- draw our charge d'affaires and I expect lhat Ihe Ciualemiflau government will draw (he Scheel said. Ho added that he planned to tell Ihe ambassador public opin- ion in West Germany would not tolerate the presence here of a representative of the Guatema- lan government. Scheel said, however, Ihe slalcmcnt was directed at Ihe Guatemalan government and not at against Gandara person- ally, adding: "I believe that Gandara personnelly is well thought of by the West Germans public because he offered him- self as a lioslage for the ambas- sador." Interior Minister Ilans-Rie- Irich Gensclier had urged ear- lier that the members of the embassy be brought, back from because the govern- ment there had failed lo protect foreign diplomals. Count Von Spreli was kid- naped Tuesday and killed Sun- day after Ihe Guatemalan gov- ernment refused the demands of the Hcbcl Armed Forces, or FAR, for the release of 22 jailed FAR members and in ransom money. The (errorisls warned several times that Ihey would kill the 63-year-old diplo- mat if their demands were not met. Wesl German Chancellor Wil- ly Brandt scorned the Guatema- lan governmcnl, saying il had "shown ilsclf unable to give ac- credited diplomatic representa- tives necessary security." In a statement issued in El Paso, Tex., during his tour of the Unit- ed Slates, he said cooperation between countries "will be seri- ously threatened if il does not prove possible lo prevent terror- ist actions of this kind." Brandt said his government had made known lhat it was willing to pay Ihe "but unfortunately Ihis was to no avail." The body of Ihe frail, 63-year- old ambassador was found about 12 miles from Guatemala Cily, near an adobe hoiise where he was believed to have been held. He wore a blue suil, white shirl, black shoes, and had a watch on his left wist and a ring on his finger. By ELLIE RUCKER and BETTY GRISSOM Is It Possible To Pad Census? Q. Are Ihere'aiiy safeguards set up U assarc1 a true count in Ihe coming census? U Is natiral lhat the Chamber of Commerce and vartots organizations should want the highest count, tat to many of us accurate const, even though lower than would be more desirable. A. Hal Graham, Census Supervisory Crew Leader over the Abilene area, said there's just no way Ihe count could be padded to any great extent. It's possible that an enumerator could add one or two names and get away wilh it, but the crew leaders are familiar wilh Iheir areas and could detect this. He said there's a large fine and a prison term given for tampering with the census count or disclosing any information from Ihe census forms. The Chamber of Commerce doesn't have access to any Census information, they just loaned their facilities as a meeting place. AH the Chamber of Commerce has spoken of is a complete count, not an inaccurate one. Q. I know of several census forms tial were not picked up last week (mine In- cluded) because everyone In lie household was working. What do we do wlih them now? A. Could be Ihe enumerator hasn't reached your area yel, but if she has and missed you on the first go around she'll be back wilhin three weeks. Crew Leader Melba Boozer suggest you leave your com'plcled queslionnaier with a neighbor if you work or are away from home. She cau- tions not to leave il with a friend across lown as enumerators must pick up the forms in a certain order in each area. Q. I've always known thai 1943 copper peonies are valuable, but recently I've been hearing the lead pennies minted la 1943 are also valuable. Is Ihls just kear- say or Is there something to H? A. The "lead" pennies have i premium, says D.-R. Pralt, coin dealer, depending on their condition and where they were minted. A set of from each mini Philadelphia, San Francisco) would be worth aboul 50 cenls, Those pennies, by Ihe way, are lead as many think. Rumors aboul 19-13 copper pennies have been rampant, Iheir value has been rumored to be In but the government says it never issued a 1943 copper penny and reports of Ihese when 'investigated have turned out to be copper-coaled steel pen- nies. Q. I would like to know how many bold Issues arc outstanding In Taylor Counly, Including bond issues. What Is (he lotal bond debt of Ihe taxpayer ttf the cily of Abilene, comly and school liclutlcd? A. There are 11 bond issues involved lhat were issued from 1954 through 1966 and the tost of these will be paid oul in 1994. For Ihe city: water and sower tax bonds will total as of Sept. 30, 1970; general obligation bonds will tolal For the .West Central Texas Municipal Waler Dislricl (four cities, Abilene, Anson, Albany and outstanding debt is as of Sept. 30, 1370. Outstanding bonds for Taylor Counly totaled as of April I, and some of these will be retired in April. For Ihe School District: outstand- ing bond total as of April 1 was Q. I'm not sure you will want lo bother wilh questions about movie stars, bit Is Robert Taylor sill] alive? My daughter and I both think be died suddeily a year ago, but we're lot sure. A. He died almost a year ago on June 8, 19B3, al age 57 after a long battle with lung cancer. A hard working man, he starred in more than 70 movies, played in several TV series and raised Quarter-horses and black chickens.'He replaced Ronald Reagan as host of the TV show "Death Valley Days" when Reagan began his campaign for the California governorship. Gov. Reagan delivered Ihe eulogy at his funeral. P.S. You'll have a hard time finding a question that Action Line won't bother with. Q. I've been noticing that magazines and newspapers spell "buslsg" with a single "s." On "hat rale of spelUig Is Ihls ac'ttM based? The rale I remember Is that when we kave a sligle syllable word ending In a single consMant wfclch Is preceded by a single vowel, we siwJd double Ihe cetsonaat when add- ing "Ing." For example: trfp- Irlpptng, stir stirring, plan planning, aTl these consonants are doubled so how come Is spelled will a sligle A. It's puzzling all right, according to that rule it would be doubled, bul the latest dictionaries spell' U both ways, with single s as (he first style lisled. On what rule is this based? Dry George Ewing, head of ACC English Dept. says il's based on Ihe "majority rule of usage, even though the rule you slated is one of tha few lhat works 95 per cent of the Umc. Could he thai il's spelled wilh one s to distinguish from .the bussing that means, kissing. He says the bus became a verb only in the last few years and modem day changes usually pose problems with (he old rules.   

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