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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 24, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                bilene Reporter 'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 89T1I YEAR, MO. 279 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 24, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press SUNDAY Break Minted in New York Workers Returning to Jobs By BOH MONKOH Assonulnl Press Writer Sinking postal workers re- turned lo I heir jobs in Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia ami niin-ti of Connecticut iiiul New Jersey today. 'I'licre were hints of a break in New York, wlx're federal li-oops sorted mail on President Nix- on's orders. Tin; Pentagon denied reimrls lhal wtii) worked in New York post offices until I ;i.in. had liL'cn ordered lo delay tlicir return this morning. However, National Guardsmen who also were called up on I lie Presi- dent's orders, were held in :ir- inirics and were lo be sent to tile post offices aflcr luncli. Normal mail deliveries re- sinned in I'liiladelphia ;is letter carriers returned tu work in that city, last holdout in Pennsylvania. All of Comicclicul's major postal centers were back at full operation except Hartford, where clerks were picketing and scheduled to vole. Curriers had voted not to cross clerks' picket lines. Workers returned in Jersey Cily, Asbury Park, Morrislown, Red Bank, 1-akcwofld and New Brunswick, N.J., white in Ne- wark a vote was later in the day. While operations were return- ing lo normal in Detroit, postal workers at Lansing, Mich., made good their threat to strike if the President called in troops in New York. Several Delroil suburbs also continued lo strike. Officials of the Chicago branch of Hie National Associa- tion of Letter Carriers led the return in that city. A post office spokesman indicated that the men had returned at 32 of 52 neighborhood branches. In Delroil, Itobcrt Purdue, di- rector of postal operation, said the workers appeared to be re- turning in full force at the G a.m. sliift change. I'ickcl lines went down in from of the main city pnsl office. Pickets were still up at the Military Ocean Terminal in Brooklyn add most were billrr over the President's decision to deploy the troops. But there ap- peared to be some sentiment for a return. L.C. Burke, the station vice president of Local 1 of the mail handlers union, said; "We might as well go back, the sol- diers are in rnd we don't have much lo gain staying out." Another member agreed, .say- ing, "I don't want lo lose my job." However the majority of the pickets said they would not go back until they got word from 'he local president. National Guard troops began ID assemble at armories in the New York metropolitan area at. 6 a.m. in accordance with Pen- tagon directives. Maj. Gen. Martin H. Foery, tlicir commanding officer, said he Ihought the earliest his men would move into the post offices would be in the afternoon "if the strikers don't come back." In Washington, Monday, congressional leaders lold the House and Senate they may have to skip Iheir Easter recess to stand by for possible emer- gency action. Nixon Proposes School Aid Plan Billion Urged to Aid 'Racially-Impacted' Areas THROUGH SLF.KT AND STOKM from l-'oii Dix, fs.J., say goodbye to Ihcir mili- tary home as tlicy leave for New York lo de- liver the mail. About men left from Fort Dix and JMcGnire Air Force Base. (AP Wire- photo) Dead Ike Proof Hotel By .MAHCAtiKT STAIiCS SAN J'licrlo Hico (AP) A Family Relations Court judge nl WestlJiiry, N.Y., was shol dead early today outside a U.S. Navy residential coiupniind while walking to his nearby ho- tel. Police arrested a man who had arrived in Pucrlo Hico [our days earlier from New York. Shot dead with a bullet in (lie stomach was 4li-vcar-old .ludge Michael M. 1'elilo, of Syossell, N.Y. Charged with first-degree murder and illegal possession of a weapon was Bernardo Ciiache Adorno, 2fi, The Bronx, N.V.. who had been slaying Ihc past [our nights at the Central Hotel, a low-priced Imlcl in Old San Juan. San .Tunn Investigations Court Judge Viclor A. Torn or- dered Criachc Adorno field on bail. Police said Cri.-iclii is niiirriwl and has two children. The manager of tlie Norman- die Hotel, Andres Santiago, said Judge 1'clilo had checked into the liolel last Tlmr.iday. V.c quoted Pclito as sayinj; he was on vacation. A departure dale had not been set, Santiago said. Police said six young boys re- ported Ihe shooting and helped out Ihe suspect. Police gave the following ac- count of the shooting as related by the boys: They were in a car driving along Kivcra Jioad near the Navy compound where the loj) Navy official in the Carrib- bean, Adiii. 11. A. Matter, lias Ins home. Two met] were standing on n sidewalk in front of the com- pound. One had his arm around Ihc neck of the oilier from Ijc- hind and was pointing what ap- parently was n gun nt his side. They said they heard a shot and one of the men licgan lo stump lo the ground. Tlicy sairl the other man grabbed him around Hie neck before he fell and pulled him lo one side of Ihc walkway under some overhang- ing palm branches. The boys snid Hie assailant then started walking across Ihc street. The boys drove a short distance and found a policeman, who look Ihc suspect into custo- dy alMiul a bloc-k away. Silver Dollar To Cost SAN FRANCISCO For 513 you soon may able lo purchase an Eisenhower proof silver dollar, says Mary T. Brooks, director of the United States Mint. A lower grade Eisenhower silver dollar, but containing the same 40 per cent silver, would sell for she said Monday in a news conference at the San Francisco Mini. Proof coins are double stamped by opera- tors, giving special allenlion lo avoiding dust in (he stamping dye or scratches on the mclal. The lower grade coins are single stamped and receive less attention. Neither lype is intended for circulation. Yon also may have an Kiscnhowcr dollar for a 51 bill, but Ihe coin will be made of copper and nickel. The new Eisenhower dollar will go into production Oct. H, Hie ROlh birth anni- versary of (he late former president, if an authorization bill already approved by the senate, passes the House, Mrs. Hrooks said. They would be Ihe first silver dollars minled since 1935, she said. Thc mint would lurn out 20 million of the special proof, high grade dollars over Ihe next four years, slie said. The hand-finished special proof dollars "will be literal Mrs. Brooks said. The mint also would produce 5130 million in silver Ike dollars of the lower grade. Hy FRANK COKMIEH Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- dent Nixon unveiled today a plan for federal aid to "racial- ly-impacted" and proposed two- year spending of billion to help them with their problems. Nixon said his aim is to make school desegregation easier and more effective, lo raise Ihc standard of predominantly black schools and to promote in- lerracial conlacl for pupils in predominantly while schols. The President's statement was the most exten- sive ever made by a chief exec- utive on the subject of school desegregation. In it, Nixon restated his oppo- sition lo compulsory student busing lo achieve racial balance and urged lhat school boards facing desegregation decisions be given wide lalilude provided they act in good (aitli to carry out Ihe law. The President said some per- sons have interpreted adminis- Iralion actions as signaling an effort to turn hack the clock on desegregation. "We are not backing lie declared. "The constitutional mandate will he enforced." Nixon laid claim lo dramatic desegregation progress during his first year in office, saying: "In Ihe past year alone, (he number of black children at- tending Southern schools held In be in compliance has doubled, from less than to nearly representing 40 per cent of liie Negro sludcnl popu- lation." A year earlier Ihe proportion was 23 per cent. However, Nixon for Ihc most part advocaled a cautions, de- liberate approach lo desegrega- tion problems. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wellher Map, Pg. Jft) ABILENE AND VICINITY (Wmic radiuvl Fnir and w.irm twljy and lofiiqhf; ar.d turning High Ihis dfteiroon, WES; .low Iwiiqhl, r.SB- M; high lorrorrcw, near 70. Southwesterly wir.ds Al 15-75 m.p.h., shilling to Wednesday allrrnoon. High arxf lov; Icr ending am.: 73 and H. High ar-tj sarr.e dale lasl 47 smJ 51. Sunsel fas( njgM: sunriK forfay: f.ls; sur.scl Icnignl: "If we are lo be realists, we musl recognize tlial in a free so- cicly there are limils lo Ihe amount of government coercion that can reasonably he used; Dial in achieving desegregation we must proceed with the least possible disruption of Ihe educa- tion of tlm n a t i o n 's children. Nixon said. In broaching his billion spending plan, the President lhat "While raising the quality of education in all schools, we shall concenlrale on racially-impacted schools, and particularly on equalizing those schools that are furthest behind." He said he will ask Congress In divert S509 million, previously earmarked for other domestic programs, for his racially-im- pacted school project in the 1971 fiscal year that begins July 1. "For fiscal he said, have ordered that billion be budgeted for Ihe same pur- poses." U.S. Diplomat Kidnaped By Gunmen in Caribbean SANTO DOMINGO, Domini- can Uepublic air at- tache of the U.S. Embassy here uas kidnaped third American diplomat kidnaped in Latin America since Scptcsnbcr. Police and (be U.S. Embassy said Lt. Col. Donald J. Crowlcy was seized on a polo field near Hie Kl Embajador Ilnlel. An informant at the hotel said IIFI saw the -17-year-old Crowlcy taken away hy four or five "un- mcn aL a.m. He said they arrived at the polo field in a while car. The embassy would not con- firm reports I hat Crowlcy's kid- napers intnnded lo use him as ransom [or a score of political prisoners Jield here. Among (hose prisoners men- tioned was Maximiliano Gomez, si'cretary-genoral of the Domin- ican Popular Movement, a Com- nnjnist-orienled group, who has been held on charges of terror- ism for two months. Crowley, born in El Paso, Texas, arrived in the Dominican Republic in May 1968. He has a wife, Nancy, three daughters and a son. The polo field where he was kidnaped was (he sile of the ini- tial landings al U.S. troops, who entered ihc Dominican Republic in IMS on the orders of Presi- dent Lyndon B. .lohnson in tiic midst of civil political strife. The Dominican Republic Is presently Ihe scene of cam- paigning for May's prcsidenlial election. Crowlcy is the Ihird North American to be kidnaped in i.al- in America in Ihe past seven months. C. Burke Klbrick, U. S. Why No Light at Ambler, Willis? By ELUE HUCKEIt and BETTY GRISSOM Q. Why Is there no Iraftic liglil al Ambler and Willis? Seems lhal an inter- section lhal lias enough traffic for a pulrol car every Sunday morning needs a irafflc light. A. The City Traffic Dcpf. thinks so too; it's one jump ahead of you, n light is already scheduled for thai location, it's been approved nnd Traffic Kngincer Hud Taylor says it should be installed by June. Q. What Is the American Horse Council? Whal Is Its purpose? How docs II differ from Ihe American Horse Show Association? A. They're completely diffcrcnl types of organizations, horse-breeder I-co Fry Kays. The American Horse Council was formed to promote and advance scientific studies (o benefit Hie various breeds of horses. For example they granted endowment for Ihe study of causes and cures of swamp fever. The Horse Council also attempts to prevent unfavorable tax legislation (hat might hurl the horse industry; il recently headed off legislation to prevent tax write- offs on horse breeding farms. The American Horse Show Assn. was formed to promote uniform and teller horse show conditions for gailcd horses, Tennessee Walking horses, jumpers, hunters, etc., Fry said. Q. IHiy do we not gel Channel 6 on cabin? We used lo RC! It anil now It's only Ihc same programs shown on Channel 5 on calilc. A. Many have experienced this same problem. If you'll set your channel selector Channel 6 then lurn your fine tuning knob two or three complete turns, the Channel 6 program should appear on Ihe screen. This has worked for. others; if lhat doesn't work for you let us know and we'll seek another solution. Q. How many people could Ihe cnlosscum ol Rome scat? A. Seating capacity for tlic Colosseum was according lo information in Roman history linnks found b> Ihe Public Library Staff. Our Taylor County Coliseum in comparison lias a permanent scaling capacity of Incidentally, staff members in Ihe Reference Section of Ihe library will give anyone help in answering questions, as a public service. Q. IX) yon knnw anyone who gives private art lessons anil how much do they charge? A. Mnsl art teachers seem to prefer group lessons because they feel the sludcnls learn more when they're with other budding artists they can learn from each other's mistakes. However Action Nine did find several teachers who arc willing to give private lessons and we've scnl you tlicir names. Their hourly charges range from lo llicy would charge less than half this amount for group lessons. Address questions to Action Line, Rnv 30, Alillrnc, Texas, 79fiDi. Names will not be used but questions must he signed nnd addresses given. Ambassador to Brazil, was kidnaped in in Rio de .lanciro and released afler Hie Brazilian government freed ]5 polilical prisoners and sent, them lo Mexico. The labor attache of (he 11. S. Embassy in Guatemala, Sean M. Holly, was kidnaped in Gua- temala City on March 6 and re- leased after Ihe government (here freed three imprisoned gurrilliis. Six days later the Japanese consul general in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Nobuo Okuchi, was kid- naped and released for the free- dom of five Brazilian political prisoners. Foreign Minislor Alberlo Phony Calls Becoming Bothersome Perhaps Abilene merchants and agencies which are bfllhcrexl by phony calls for goods and services arc going to have lo resort lo an old weapon verifying the requests by return- ing (he call. Police reported another example of this lype of cnl! Monday niglil. A soulhside resident lold police al p.m. (hat within Ihe preceding 45 minutes eigbl businesses or services had come to his home. Included were Ihe fire department an ambulance, B pizza and a rcnlal car. He llioughl lie recognized the voice of an acquaintance when he listened lo a recording one of the agencies had made of Ihc caller. Police spoke with the man bill no complaint was made against him. Al It p.m., three hours after the first incident, registered nursB came lo Ihe home of Ihc annoyed cili7.cn. Her services also had not been requested by him. Police chief Warren Dodson points out lhat il is a felony to give false information to a government agency w h i c li requires an emergency vehicle. A city ordinance makes it a misdemeanor lo make a false report lo a governmental agency, according lo Assistant City Attorney Brill Thurman. He sain" Ihe fine for the offense is to Fucnles Mohr of Guatemala was kidnaped 27 during lhal nation's presidential elec- tion campaign, lie was freed in exchange a jailed member of the licbel Armed Forces of Guatemala. Martin Accused Of Compromising His Stale Office AUSTIN (AP) Disl. Judge David Brown of Sherman says Ally. Gen. Crawford Martin "compromised the office of al- innic.y general" hy asking cor- poration lawyers to help pay campaign expenses after Mar- tin was elected in Brown is miming against Mar- tin in the Democratic primary. lie said Martin lold corpora- lion lawyers Iliat he owed in campaign dcbls. Martin's official primary and general election statements filed with the secretary of stale show he owed .Martin said he did ask law- yer friends who represent cor- porations lo help him pay his campaign debt. He denied owing "I jus! think the whole thing is ridiculous, not worthy of .1 stand on what my campaign expense account Martin said. "I don't deny soliciting money aflcr I was clcclctl to pay cam- paign Martin said. Hut he said he could not recall whether his post-election solici- tation included any lawyers who represent corporations. Throughout the campaign, he said, "probably 10 per cent of my money came from lawyers who represent corporations.. mn.sl of them were personal friends. T didn't solicit anyone who was not NEWS INDEX Amusements 4B Bridge 6A Classified 8-12B Ccmics 7B Editcrio's..............6B Hoicscope 6A Ho'.cilal Pollenls 3A CDilirarici 2A Soarls 10.1IA This Marl's Art.........4B To Your Health 7A TV Women's News ,r 33   

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