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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, March 11, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - March 11, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                 Cfje Abilene Sporter  "WITHOUT OR With OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES"—Byron  rn a  COLD,  RAINY  SOTH YEAR NO. 266 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY MORNING, MARCH ll, 1970 -TWENTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS    Pre.™(ZP)  10c DAILY- 20c SUNDAY  nu ii,ie  by Katharyn Duff  ildif.ff-J*  irtrmilliif""  Before we go off to explore Hawaii or Europe we should learn our own backyard and last Sunday afternoon, that sparkling day when spring put in a brief appearance, we prowled a part of it.  Have you found Mountain Pass in the west central part of the county? It is worth the effort. And when you do you will discover, there beside the dirt road, a small parade of historical markers and p'aqiies pointing out the sites, detailing the events of this region’s earliest recorded history.  * * +  Those who look on our pra ne and see no beauty might head for the lulls west of Buff a. lo (lap.  Take Hoad 89 out of the Gap. Go out by the Buffalo Gap Cemetery where you should stop to see the lovely chapel built by the V C. Fermi family, a stone structure with a magnificent stained glass window so set as to take advantage of the rays of a setting Min,  Back to Road 89 and wind south and west, past (amp Tonkawa and State Park and Lake Abilene, int into the hills  Local Census Crew Leaders  Announced  past the flighty developed randies which are among the oldest in this area.  ijr ♦    ♦  You play tag along the way with Elm Creek, above Lake Abilene, and as you cross it and track it you might wonder, where’s pollution? Here is a running stream, sparkling clear.  Road 89 takes you to I S. 277. Pause there at the* intersection to see the marker which identifies a spot thought to be a camp site for the Spanish explorer, Coronado. Then cross 277 onto the new EM road 2928  Elm Creek and the highway travel along together arui the river beaches bring picnics to mind.  * * *  \ few miles along the new LM and, if you seek Mountain Pass, you take to unpaved roads. Don’t ask us which one. On this journey we had pilot and navigator who know the Taylor County countryside. Attorney Robert B. Wagstaff (who is responsible tor identifying the historic sites and getting the maikers in place) and his wife, Texas.  You t an see Mountain Pass, a distinctive break in the hills. Mid try enough of the dirt roads and you will surely find the path. lf the Butterfield stage line made it through rn the years before roads, you can do it.  Cold  Remain  cal  UU)  if a bari  lie  the  freeze  Cold, damp, dreary - gray “beneficial, or it weather permeated Abilene and because it forms a prote the Big Country Tuesday and cover ova r the fruit buds Tuesday night.    added, “If the mist cont  The only signs of white were  the wa,,r Wil!  ended and d a report of snow Hurries in  t,U(is  Munday and Knox City. Big conies Spring was anticipating snow  Tuesday evening.    ,    ,    ,  aden thunderstorms spiked w ith d  winds lashed the o Lower Rio Grande Valley, South w including the Greater b area, and sections of s Antral I  Snow fell in the Nmanllo are late Tuesdav night as big. hai  xx a  Continued rain and icy cold ,    ...  r .ii    strong gush  temperatures for Abilene were  the weatherman’s forecast for .j.  Wednesday and Thursday; .  Northwest Texas had light snow >•  t .  (   in various sectors as the cold  01   front worked its way across the  northern half of the state.  In the Big Country drizzling  rains covered the area, hardly  measurable. It was described  I in some places as a fine mist.  accompanied by cold.  | Temperatures remain well  below 50 in all parts of the Big  Country.     The  citv of Abilene  Abilene experienced only a  name( i j n a  $39,370.30 trace of rain. The probability of  fl | ei j \ )V  k i n a r <  ■' •,In - ‘a,i’' A- were post  : mr ti " c ’ fraI arid norths  •    ■    Plains fog'  icdnesdi as the inclement* eat her w< expected to con*i nue until the weekend.    '  The Weather Bureau said now could cause hazardous riving conditions Wednesday ver a South Plains area northward from Cochran and Cros-y Counties. Forecasters said now accumulations up to 3 nches could bo expected.  Contractor Sues City on Terminal  rain Wednesday is 80 per | with the j dipping  Wednesdav night.  has been completion of the contract until I suit Oct. I, 1969. »hc suit alleges, and e c k the firm asks $25,190.89 for the   f ' n ' Construction  Co.  Abilene  Crew leaders for the census have boon named I W ichita Falls district offic The  Castle Peak, and it can be identified bv its I »ok, marks the opening of the pa^v And there, within a mile or so, 1970 near Oilman I)u>ty Rhodes’ the ranch house, you come onto tho markers.  Violence holts Brown trial  Judge Harry E. Dyer, left, along with defense attorney William Kunstler, right, and prosecutor William Yates, second from right, examine the car in which two voung Negroes were killed late Monday night when an explosive device went off in a car. The blast occurred one mile south of Rd Air, Md., where the trial of black militant Rap Brown on arson and riot charges opened Monday. Story, Pg. 5*A. (AP Wirephoto)    ____  Minutemen with MIRVs To Be Deployed in June  WASHINGTON (AP) — The Each Minuteman III will car-(the Pentagon discloser! Tuesday ry three independently  :x leaders in Abilene are One of the markers tells the Mrs. Su^an Sims of 2802 (lid story of Castle Peak and the Anson Rd. Mrs. Melba J. Boozer change of its name from the of 1857 Jeanette, Mrs. Freda F. original t a g. Abercrombie McCallister of 1792 University Peak.  Blvd Mrs. Ann Fry of 35 Scott Two of the markers relate Place, Mrs. Myrle B. Hughes the stories of early Indian of 1441 Minter Lane and Ruth ba’lles which took place in the Williamson of 742 Amarillo.    pass.  Each crew leader will  The f,Hir!h marker tells of  supervise 15 20 enumerators rn •‘ 1, ‘ s’age coach station whuh the head-counting and will train  u;!S  located in the pass to the ( numerators sometime later serve the Butterfield Southern in the month.    Overland Mail when it was  Crew* leader training session^ making its inns through this will include procedures for wasteland just before the Civil recruiting census enumerators. War. training, canvassing methods,    *    *    *  preparation and submission of I* rom Mountain Pass wind reports and supervision of along local roads to Merkel enumerators to insure a you can see it so you can complete and accurate count.    easily find it and 1*29. I hen,  Duties of the crew leaders zip, and you ale home, are to recruit and train the It is a beautiful as well as enumerators, assign each one to interesting ride. It is a path a district, to review the work of planned lot* a pilgrimage the each one and see that it is Taylor County Historical correct and handle problems of Society will sponsor when difficult enumeration.    spring is here to stay.  Gov. Reagan Says Hell Run Again  SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP)  — Gov. Ronald Reagan announced his candidacy for a second four-year term Tuesday, telling the’state’s 29 million residents that “together we can give new luster to the magic of California.”  Reagan, tile 59-year-old Republican and former actor, said,  “There is no limit to the heights we can reach” if the original American spirit of the 1770s can be recaptured.  “Tile years ahead can be great ones and I would like to help as California leads the way to be a part of that effort with you,” he added.  But Reagan said the future will net be “a handout.”  “It will take common sense, hard work and a constant commitment to law and order and  justice ... it will come wheni izen temporarily in public serv-  government gets off your back  ice . .he said.    Amusement, ........ 6A  and out of yoni way so man Democrat Jess    Unnih,    Rea-    Astrology ............. 7B  can achieve his polen id ,  vC ‘ "| g an » s  likely opponent in    the gen-!    Bridge . .............6A  gun said.     era l election, said earlier Tues- rSIIsfJIj ° w *  r i2B  His statement came in a pre- . fR »    cioss.f.ed .......... 8-12B  recorded television program  dd >  of R(d ^ n *    I    thrill. ' •............ ll  broadcast as a paid political an- “To continue the aura of the; ^    ........... 12B   nouncement over 15 television amateur in politics is the height  Morkets      6,    7B   1 ---------”    Obituaries ............ 2A    April,    and    construction    bids    will  ,       th(  unrelenting coldness  firm which was  contractor f< below freezing new Municipal Airpo ght.    i    Terminal.  Tuesday’s weather, however, was not reflected in Abilene traffic. There were no accidents involving even minor injuries in the afternoon, and few fender-benders were reported.  Taylor County Sheriff’s office reported the weather was causing no problems on the county roads, and this was repeated by Department of Public Safety Officers covering the area.  If the weather doesn't get any colder, it may actually do area  ¥)0 ( j avs  f or  completion of the fruit orchards a good deed. facility, the suit alleges.  That was the opinion Tuesday  ( * {)m pietion date was to ne I of Clyde fruit farmer Clarence March 15, 1969.  Hicks who raises pecan, apricot. x) ie  f irm  alleges that in order peach, pear and plum trees. He to satisfy the city’s called the weather in Cisco requirements that portions of  exposed surfaces in the airport building have sandblasted finish for “aesthetic purposes,’  additional s e v i obligation of iii facilities.  n t I: - rn o n t h pursennel and  sis  The suit was filed late Tuesday in 104!h District Court by Attorney Stanley Wilson.  The firm is suing the city fin payment of extra costs it alleges were incurred by additional sandblasting, and from cleaning up from flash flooding which v aieges resulted from delay in furnishing o ing certain facilities.  Kinard-Beck entered int $558,973 contract with the ch March 20 1968, and w  represent additional work required by the * ity which was not contemplated by the contractural documents and    bv the    bid    submitted by  Kinard-Beck, the suit alleges.  It is further alleged that on three occasions, flash flooding caused dirt and silt to wash into the    city’s    the    portion    of    the terminal  ■ complot-    building which    is constructed  below ground level.  The firm alleges that, due to ity on    city    delays    in    completing the  given sewage lino, Kinard-Beck employes incurred expenses of $1,433.53 in clean up operations.  IO-warhead Poseidon is  WHERE ll RAINED  that the first U.S. land-based warheads.    al    in    January    197i.  missiles with multiwarhead    its sea-based    counterpart    is    Although    the    Tuesday    hearing  MIRVs w ill be deployed in June. the Poseidon    missile.    The    first    was    closed,    the    committee    re-  'I he disclosure was made by of the    Navy's    Polaris    nuclear    leased    transcripts    of    Mime    of  Secretary of the Air Force Robert C. Seamans at a closed session of the Senate Armed Serv-;' ices Committee, Deployment previously had been listed as scheduled in late 1970.  “After a number of delays and stretchouts,” he said, “we will start fielding the Minuteman III in June.”  The Minuteman III is an advanced intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) equipped with three Multiple Independently Targeted Re-entry Vehicles (MIRVS).  .Senate critics of the Nixon administration’s arms-control poll cies have fought for the past year to convince it to take the ;  lead in a U.S.-Soviet moratorium of MIRV deployment as a spur to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) which re open April 16 in Vienna.  The administration, however, has taken the position that continued progress on deploying the MIRV is necessary both for national security and to enable the United States to negotiate from strength at the SALT talks.  Seamans said in his testimony (that “Minuteman III improvements will insure that our surviving missiles could penetrate the Soviet ABM system" following a Soviet attack on the United States. The Nixon administration’s Safeguard antiballistic  .................   —    Kinard-Beck    was    required    t  aimed scheduled to become operation- ABILENE .........Tues    2-1)    sand.nasi numerous areas u h  submarines being refitted with the testimony.  Chicago Gives Up 'Hog Butcher' Title  CHICAGO (API — The operator of Chicago’s stockyards announced Tuesday a decision that will dispose of Chicago’s former claim of being “hog butcher to the world.’’  The Union Stock Yard and Transit Co. said it plans to discontinue handling hogs within 30 to 90 days. Cattle operations will continue.  Chicago became the leading slaughterer and packer of hogs at the time of the Civil War. The late poet Carl Sandburg in his “Chicago” gave the city its "hog butcher to the world” title.  The decision to abandon hog operations, the company said in a statement, resulted from a steady  Municipal Airport Total for Year Normal for Year  ANSON ........  DUBLIN ........  ROTAN ......  U S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Weather Map, Pg 12E»)  ABILENE AND VICINITY (40-mile ra dius)    Cloudy and continued cold  I wednesday and Wednesday night, with a probability of ram at 80 per cert. Thursday more of the same, slightly i wanner, with a high probability of precipitation Hiqh Wednesday .42. Low Wednesday night near 30. Winds northerly 10-15 m.p.h.  TEMPERATURES  Total bad not been prov ided in TIL specifications under which the 3.25 job was bid.  2.27 'The firm asks payment of .19 $12,835.91 for this work.  .21 Kinard-Beck also alleges that TP. certain tie-ins of water and    sewage lines could not be made  until th<‘ city had completed I certain sewage lines which it I elected 'ti complete with its own employes.  A delay in this completion delaved Kina r d - B e c k ’ s  NEED CASH?  Look around the house and garage for those items that you no longer use. Sell  them in the  Family Week-Ender  FRI.- SAT.-SUN.  3 Lines 3 Days  No Extension or Refurd af This Rata Approximate!y 15 Average WorNi No Phone Orders Pleosa  Only  ; 2"°  CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE SI.95 ABILENE RcPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M.  Tues. a.  44  41  40  3?  37  37  37  37  36  35  36 36  1:00  2:00  3.00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00  5.00 9:00  10:00 It OO 12:00  Tues. p.m.  36  35  . ...    .    35  . .    _____ 34  ........  34  .    33  ......    33   ........33  .    .33   ...... 33  High end low for 24-hours ending 9 p.m.: 47 and 33.  r*"**/,    —    "**'*"'■    *’    *    *    **■ "* 7, “*    •»    Hiqh    and    low sane date last year. 37  decline in hog receipts at the yards over the past and 26.  j..    °    Sunset    last    night: 6 43; sunrise today:  live years.    6.55; sunset tonight: 6:44.  Barometer reading at 9 p.m.: 29.91.  -  mm—n-T-rnwm.....  Humidity    at    9 p.rn  78 per cent.  AOM Will Build Vegetable  Research Center in Munday  HSr  13* Na**  By TOM PORTER Reporter-News State Editor  MUNDAY — Announcement of  _    missile    (AUM; system    is de-     cons|njction  „ f    a large Texas   ^.signed    in plated    the    Minute-     A&M  university    research sta-   111  rC    ,,    ,. h :„ r     lion at Munday    offered a Lighten John I) Ryan, the    ,     M    d   of staff of the Air Force, said rn §    Commerce    and  hs testimony that ‘‘Minuteman.     Tuesd   IIT possesses improved surviva- . ..     H    J   bilify,    penetration    capability,     n1 ^ *  payload and accuracy over the ^ n .  a  reciprocal gestuie older Minuteman systems ” officials of Munday dedicated  RONALD REAGAN . still ‘just a citizen’  NEWS INDEX  two tracts of land to Texas A&M for vegetable research.  Deeds for a 40-acre tract of land near Goree, and another IO 8 tract inside the Munday City limits were received by Dr. L. S. (Bill) Pope, associate dean I at A&M.  Dr. Pope announced that final plans for a 4,490 square foot building will be presented to the A&M Board of Directors in  and 25 radio stations.    of hypocrisy.’  As iii his first campaign in Unruh, 47, tho Assembly I) 1966 Reagan billed himself as a man of the late Sen. Robert F. “citizen politician.”    Kennedy’ 1968 California presi-l  “After three years in    office    I    dential campaign, called Rea-!  still think of myself as just    a    cit-    gan a “standstill governor.” I  GUS F. METSCHER ... 70s challenging  the Texas House of Representatives, addressed the crowd of about 250.  After accepting the land deed, Dr. Pope stressed that the new research station will serve the entire area. He said 'here will be four offices, a conference and class room area 1  seating 50 people, a OOO foot lab area where pollution would be studied, a 1240 square feet of work area for laboratory research, equipment housing area and numerous other facilities.  “By this fall,” said Dr. Pope, “We could have one of the finest vegetable research centers in the state.”  Also honored was W O. Smith, who was chairman of the 1969 Vegetable Festival.  Speaker Mutscher w a s  Taking.  .shape  CHI ................ 13A  Sports .........9-11 A  Sylvia Porter .......... 7B  TV Loa    ............. HA  TV Scout    ........HA  Women's    News ........ 3B  introduced by W. S. (Bill) “Citizen of the Year for 1969 neatly of Paducah, state rep-  —*  ..... was Mrs. Cadie Ann Combs,| r esc* n tati V e for this area. He  The research station could be manager of the Munday Cham- described Mutscher as hefting completed in September or ber of Commerce for the past in  October.    'years.    Gus Mutscher, speaker of    Turn lo MUNDAY, Fg. 2-A  be sent out and accepted soon after that.  •a.i. „......... -  in September  This is a view of the John F. Kennedy Memorial in downtown Dallas near the assassination site. The above ground work is being paid for by private funds. The county built a parking garage beneath the memorial. (AP WuephoUtf  >   

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