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Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, March 3, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 3, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gbilme "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TH YEAR, NO. 250 P1IONK 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79G04, TUESDAY EVENING, SI ARCH 3, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated I'rcss (fP) [Uc SUN'DAY By ELL1K IIUCKHU mid lllHTY UHISSOM How Did Abilene Get Its Name? rj.Hnw dill Abilene Kfl Us name and wlio gave II lo Abilene? A. .1. N. Simpson and .1. n. Merchant, pioneer r.inclicrs, ;irc credited with coining with the name Abilene. Until ranchers hart driven cattle inln Abilene, Kan. and thought it was n wonderful loan. They hoped (hoir MOM' (own in Host Texas would become Important in the caltlc industry also, so decided it should be called Abilene, Tex. I'm sciiiHns yon 11 (Medicare) form whicli I received hy mail from my [iimlly doctor. I was snruvlsrd In ncl lltcsc Mlnnk (nvnis IIP SIRII as I've always paid cash for my medical services. A( no time have 1 "Medicare" reimbursement. Will you please find out 11 It's a common pniclU'c aiming iiieui- hers of (he meilii'al prnfrsslnn (o have their patients blank forms lo filled mil later hy (lie tloclnr In accnr- dnnre with liis personal Incllnalhms. Seems dial such a practice ronsllliili's a largo lonpholc fur possible fraud. A. II. H, Tulcy nf the .Social Scnirily Office says the forms may have sent out by an overly-industrious secretary who was wanting to ahead nf her schedule, although it's not a common practice, lie explains there arc several safeguards in insure against (rand: When Medicare payment is requcsicd hy a doctor Hie fee is examined for inflated charges, then a nolh-c is sent In the patient the amount of rcimhurscmenl. Your doctor, should then reimburse yon; if he dors not, contact (lie Social Security office and officials Ihcre will investigate. Q. I w mirier if ynn know of anything (hat will kill mistletoe in a tree vllhntil harming the Irec1.' A. Looks as if there's nn solution except pruning Hie mistletoe out of the tree with a knife or pole primer. County Aycnl II. C. Stanley predicts there's a cool million wail- ing for the person who can come up with a spray chemical that would do the job! Q. .Ian. lo was Ihe liirllulay of Martin l.ulhcr King. This is nut a legal holiday hill II Is my understanding llinsc ulio clinsc could lie ahsenl from school upon ties anil panilnr services'.' wrillen consent nf parents and were per- milled in make "p Hu'ir uork. Is Iliis correct'.' The School Hoard policy is Ihal if a parent wants lo lake a child out of school, lie is free lo dn this. Depending on Hie reasons for the absence, a student may not allowed to make up work missed. The prin- cipal of (lie .school you mentioned said several students bronchi written requests 10 be excused Jan. 15, the requests were honored, hut the students "ere not Riven make-up privileges. Since mid-lcrni exams happened lo fall .Ian. 1.1, the students completed their exams before leaving school, actually missing only part of the day. Address questions lo Action Line. Tlnx 30, Abilene. Texas, 79fiOI. Names will not be used but questions mtisl be signed and addresses given. Nixon Research, Experimentation !s Goo The First Sign of Spring Sunny skies and the appearance of colorful flowers this week were signs that spring is just arouml the corner in the Pacific Northwest. But liic signs are also symptoms of a rlisensc dreaded by school leachcrs. Slopping to .sonic flowers in Longview, Wash., is little Michelle Gtiyer, who lias caught a case of spring fever. (AP Wirephoto) Doctors Keeping Lyndon Under Constant Observat WASHINGTON (AP) De- claring that "American ednca- lion is in urgent need of re- President Nixon asked Congress today (o sel up a now agency to conduct research and experimentation in that field. In a special message, Nixon said (lie country needs "a searching re-exnminalion of our entire lo learning." He said: "We must slop pretending that we understand the mystery of the learning process or thai we significantly applying science and technology lo the techniques of we spend less than one-hall of 1 per cent of our educational budget on research, compared with 5 per cent of our health budget and 10 per cent of de- fense." To spearhead an expanded re- search effort, .Nixon called for creation uf a National Institute of Education within Ihc Depart- ment of Health, Kducalinn and Welfare. ME eventually would lake over existing re- search programs from the Of- fice of Education. Noting Dial his budget for the 1971 fiscal year that starts July I calls for million for edu- cational increase of said mon- ey lo carry on llx> work of the iiistiliile he proposes would lie in addition lo that. The message puts no dollar figure on the over-all cost of op- crnting tiie institute. In other areas, Nixon said lie was establishing by executive order a President's Commission on School Finance with a two- year lifetime, to develop recom- mendations on Ihe fiscal and or- ganizational needs of both pub- lic and private schools in the United States. "Because we have neglected lo plan how we will doal with school he said, "we have groat instability and un- certainty in Ihc financial struc- ture of education-" lie cited ns a "cause for na- tional concern" I fie gap in edu- cational spending between rich and poor slates and .school dis- tricts. Discussing Ihc problems of parochial and other schools, Nixon said their financial diffi- culties are lo he "a particular assignment of Hie commission" because, be said, if all private schools were lo clow: or turn public, the burden on public funils by I'ne end of Die lOT.s1 would exceed billion a year for operation. In addition, he es> Imialocl billion would b'j ficetied for Nixon omliir.sed "liiu right lo read as 11 national clucu'iional goal fur the Wills and said he will scion ask Congress for 5-210 million to promote reading pro- grams in both public and pri- valL- schools. Hy lilCHAHU BEENE SAX ANTONIO, Tex. (AP) Former President Lyndon It. Johnson -stricken with chest under constant ob- servation today in his special penthouse suite" on the top or an Army hospital. One of his ntlcnding physi- cians, Col. Hubert L. North, said hardening of the coronary arter- ies was reducing the flow of blood to Johnson's heart and that Ibis was the source of the pain. The physicians at Ihc Army's llrookc General Hospital .said there were no signs of a heart attack, although they noted a minor change in his electrocar- diograms, which provide a graphic record of heart move- ments. They expressed concern over the Iicnqucncy of chest pains and Jnlmson said might be hos- pitalized for several days. An aide termed his condition "stable" adding that he 'contin- ues In have some discomfort in his clicst." A major heart attack felled Johnson in 1955 when he was Senate majority leader. He was 4G a I Ihe lime. NoivSI, the former chief exec- utive svas flown 65 miles by heli- couler from Ihc LUJ Ranch Monday afternoon following ex- aminations by his heart speci- alist, Dr. .1. Willis Hurst of Emory University in Atlanta, Ga., and three Army physi- cians. NEWS INDEX Amusements 6A 5 Clossilicd ............7-9B Comics..............6B tclilcriols...........'. 4B Horoscope........... 6A Hospital Patients 3A Obiliwncs 2A Spcrls 8.9A Th.s Man's Art......6A To Your Gocd Health I OB TV Loo 9B Women's News.........3B The penthouse suite was re- furbished expressly for him when he became president in 1903. Jlrs. Johnson hurried to bis side shortly after his arrival and before long lie had received telephone calls from President rvixon, Secretary of Stale Wil- liam p. Rogers and Johnson's (wo daughters, Lynda Robb and Luci N'ugenl. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CSSA WEATHER BUREAU (Weather Map. Pg. 3M ABILENE .UJD V'ICIKIIY l-'Jmile rad usl Clear to oarily clcurty Ion qtil and Vrtrir.csday; .1 I'llln coclcr s-d Vjrrirc.-d.iy. High PLHT lov; Icnishl, a; in K'e i-ppcr v.-inds, 10-15 High arrf row lor ?J eftdirg 9 a.m.: 77 .nnd 55. afwl lew dale last vear: 55 and Sunset lasl nighl: j-jr.rise sur.scl Icnishl: Thunderstorms over the Big Country brought scattered rain, hail, thunder and lightning In the area Alonday nighl, while other parts of Ihe stale experienced heavy rains, hail and tornadoes. Gorman reported 2 inches (if fast-fallinS rain, the heaviest in the Big Country. Other areas reporting ,iu inch or more included Cisco, inches, and Buffalo (lap, urn: inch. Putnam had .90, and Winters .75 incites. In contrast, Ballingcr and Paint Kock each reported .00 inches, Albany .07, Dublin .115, anil Clyde .03. Abilene's inches brought the city's total rainfall for the year to inches, .17 inches over Use normal for the year of 2.05 inches. Hail fell al Browinvood, Dublin and Eula. near Clyde. No major damage was reported. One or more tornadoes skipped through areas just north of Fort Worth and Dallas before dawn today, causing at least some, d.-rmage, while Ihunder- slorms and oflen heavy rains batlered a broad expanse of North and Central Texas. The springlike storms, putting in appearance early Iliis year, sel oft flooding in Mineral Wells, where as much as 7 inches of rh'in poured down, and filled strecls and roadways wilii water at other points. Slate police reported a twister dipped into Grapevine northeast of Fort Worth about a.m. battering several trailer homes and knocking out windows in business places. There apparent- ly were no injuries. First c.sli- msles put the loss at around Possibly Ihe same tornado sla.shcd into Ihc Wylie commun- ilv north of Dallas about 5 a.m. and four persons suffered in- juries. Hospital attendants lifted llicm as .Airs. Joy -Allen, condi- tion undetermined, and her three children, none believed lo be seriously. Damage al Wylic wax iiol de'iK'mincd at once. The lurhitlcnl storms through the night and into this morning. H.iil rallied off rooftops during some of liu: bristling storms. Al Ihe showers ranged l.'irouHh (he plains op- posne Ihe L'pper am! Middle Texas C'oasl. s'.ill o'iicr bands of shnwers dnmpenod much o[ Xiirilieisst Texas. Police Kfil. K.S. Pui-ceU Sr. reuorled about 7 inches c'' rain sum muddy rushing as much as a [nut drcp jr. snnio stores and dwellings at Min- eral Wells, one of hardest hit places. "We find (o rescue some peo- ple off 1'ic lops of cars, even usiti" boats right in the middle of .Mineral Urn officer said. WHERE II RAINED Abilene Municipal Airport Total for Year Normal for Year A1.HA.NV HLACKWELL Pompidou Pleased of NY KLI'TALO GAP CISCO CLYDE DE LEON BUHM.N' EASTI.A.M) GORMAN LAWN MOHAN P.UAT ROCK I'UTjNAM RAiST.ER STAMKORn STKl'HC-NVILLE TfSCdLA WINTERS 2-nny 'total ..15 2.23 2.Oii .07 .03 .30 .2.5 1.C-I LI a .03 .10 .05 .41 .21 .00 .00 .50 Tr Tr. .40 .75 NEW YOIIK (AP) Both President Nixon and Georges Pompidou said Monday they were pleased with the result of Nixon's hurried trip lo New York to offer his apology for any discourtesy to Ihc French president by Americans. Nixon's gesture on the last night of Pnmpidou's eight-day slate visit appeared to have, cased ill feeling resulting from demonstrations over France's agreement lo sell 110 jets to Lib- ya while refusing to iclcase 50 to Israel. Nixon brought cheers and laughter at a dinner for I'ompi- fiou when he said fie had wanted Ihc Frencli leader lo see Ihc United Slates as an American president I must say we overdid it a bil, ay we usually do." Pompidou, who had been an- gered over what he termed in- sults lo himself and liis wife during a pro-Israel demonstra- tions in Chicago, responded by praising Nixon and saying it was a "very great joy1' lo be at Ihe dinner. liaising a glass of champagne at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel dinner for persons spon- sored by Franco-American groups, President Nixon ex- claimed: "Vive In "France is our oldest ally and our closcsl Nixon said. "That friendship is so deep and so long that no minor difficulties or bad manners arc going lo im- pair il." Pompidou beamed as Nixon spoke and replied in a "In spite of all, allies and friends." Outside ahe hole! a pro Israel demonstration drew up lo 5.000 persons at one point, then dwin- dled rapidly away. There were shouls of "lino, boo, Placards were displayed and some chained lie- brew songs. Most were peaceful and police reported one arrest. While House Press Secretary Ronald Xicgler (old newsmen on the flight hack lo Washington Hist Nixon was "quite pleased" nilh Pnmpidou's response lo his gesture and Ihc dinner. NEED CASH? Look around the house end garacie for ihosc Hems thct you no longer use. Sell (hem :n Ihc Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days Ho Kelurd Bf This Rate 15 Avcroqe Wo.-rls No Phone Orders Please Only '00 CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE SI.95 ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M. Man Soys IRS Treated Him With Contempt Petty Cash (Pennies) to Pay for' CONTK.Ml'T TAX A 23-year-old service station operator, Harold Ballcw, riglil, plans Lo pay in income tax today with a trash can full of pennies because lie said the lax agent treated him "with contempt." Story at right. (AP Wircpholo) ROYAL OAK, Midi. (AP) A service slRlion opcralor said lixlay he planned lo pay a S7W.89 U.S. income lax bill Vilh a Irasli can full of pennies be- cause a Inx man Ircalcd him "wilh contempt." Harold Ballcw, 23, went lo several banks lo collect more than rolls of pennies nml it took him and liis three employ- ees four liours to unroll Iliein and fill the can. lie .said Hint nn Internal lieve- nnc Sarvico agcnl was "pclly ;md made me feel as if I was slnrvinu his family." The HIS nfienl he mentioned had nn comment on Hallow's statement jMnnrhy. the father of four and a freshman in college, said lie never missed a tnx payment im- lil last November when Ihe quarterly bill "was just loo much." Hallow said lie senl immediately and anolher last Tuesday, bill Ihc HIS man demanded full payment on Fri- day, including interest and a penally. "lie gave me a Ballcw .saiil, ''there were words Max lien or padlock.' He was Roing lo close my business. Mow could 1 pay him if he did I'.allew said, il was all question of be had (rented me like n man, and a ciiizen Ibis never would have happened." Ballcw said he didn't Ibink Ihe IRS would "treat me this way it I were Gcinornl Motors Corp. 1 guess they figured I was jtist ,1 lilllc guy, and they could hang me." lie do if Iho 1HS uotililn'l acceitl the 20 gal- Inn trash can full of pennies. Hallow said, "I think that we'll have n roll-in, anil pay Idem with Ihe rolls. I don't want to treat them like they did me."   

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