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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, February 16, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 16, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 89TH YEAR, NO. 243 PHONE ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 10, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Aandaied I'rcss SUNDAY Panel Approves Education Funds BIRD AND HESCUER OILED UP This Au- diibon Society Volunteer taking a bird to a clean-up station is one of thousands of persons working to save birds from an oil slick following the rupture of the Greek tanker Delian Appolon in Tampa Bay Friday. (AP Wirephoto) U.S. Mediator To Enter Air Control Dispute WASHINGTON (AP) A federal mediator was called in today to help resolve a dispute.over the transfer of three air traffic conirollers that threatened to disrupt the'nation's air traffic. Secretary of Transportation John Volpe said a representative of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service serve as a mediator at the talks starting today with the Professional Air Traffic C o n I r'oi i 1 e r s Washington. A ''gigantic disruption" of air traffic had been threatened by PATCO's executive director, lawyer F. Lee Bailey. This would be brought about, he said, by PATCO controllers going by the book, no longer doing work'above and beyond what is called for by their contract and government regulations. Controllers regularly do much more than is required of them, PATCO says. An emergency meeting Sunday of PATCO leaders, Volpe, and John Shaffer, adminis- trator of the Federal Aviation Agency, led to the talks. The decision, sources diminishes for the moment the prospect for disruption of air travel. The talks are designed (o gather more facts concerning the transfer of two air traffic controllers and one technician from Baton Houge, La. However, one source close to both PATCO and the' FAA said today's meeting was designed more as a "palliative" than negotiations. PATCO reportedly sent teams out across the country last week to drum up support for-the threatened slowdown. Pollution Experts Give Up on Oil Slick By ERIC SHARP Associated Press Writer ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) Pollution experts light- ing to keep a 100-square.-mile oil slick from spreading have thrown in the towel in their un- even battle against wind and tide. They now are concentrating on keeping the oil bottled up in Tampa Bay and away from tourist-packed Gulf Coast beaches. "There's nothing we can do to slop the spread of the Capt. Anthony Fugaro of the Coast Guard said Sunday. "It's just gotten tod big for us to han- dle." The oil was-released when the Greek tanker Delian Apollon ran aground Friday. Boat owners lined up to haul Iheir oil-coated craft away as the slick poked into public and private marinas. By Sunday night, oil was be- ginning to dot the waters of Boca ,Ciega Bay between the mainland and the hotel-spotted island or St. Petersburg Beach. The slick was concentrated originally in a mass about five miles in diameter, but now laps slickily at 20 miles of shoreline along the eastern side of the Pi- ncllas Peninsula. The blanket, of viscous bunk- er-C fuel oil ranged in thickness from a coating like grease on fop of soup to ugly blotches six .indies thick. The tanker at first was be- lieved to have lost gallons, but Fugaro said Sunday he be- lieved more than gallons burst into the bay through sev- eral holes in the tanker's hull. The Delian Apollon, regis- tered in Greece, is owned by J. C. Carris and Sons, Ltd., of don, England, and was char- tered to Humble Oil Co. By EDMOND Lc DllKTON Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A compromise education and crly appropriations er than the one President Nixon vetoed but larger than he said lie would approved today by the House Appropria- tions Committee. The money bill for the Depart- ments of Health, Education and Welfare and Labor, the Office of Economic Opportunity and re- lated agencies totals bil- million above Nixon's budget estimates. The bill lie vetoed Jan. veto sustained two days later by the House- was more than ?1 billion above the budget. Nixon said in a communica- tion to Congress after the veto that he would accept a total of million increases over the budget in tlie HEW appropria- tion. The committee's action, ac- cordingly, left open the possibil- ity of another veto. The committee said in its re- port that, while the 22C-191 House vole to override the veto fell short of the constitutionally required two-thirds, "The Com- mittee took into consideration the fact that 35 more votes were cast to override lhan were cast to sustain. Therefore, it ap- peared to the committee that a compromise between the posi- tion of Hie President and the po- sition of the Congress would he logical and fair rather than the Congress deleting all of the in- creases that are still objection- able to the President." Republicans were mapping a strategy for modifying the hill more in accord willi Nixon's preferences when il reaches the House floor. They especially planned to insert language spe- cifically authorizing the Presi- dent not to expend all the funds H. C. Henson Dies al 60 H. G. (flack) Henson, 60, died about a.m. at his home at 1301 Leggetl. Funeral is pending at Elliott's Funeral Home. lie operated the Hack Drilling Co. in Abilene. provided. On one of the most holly con- tested items in the bill, for school assistance in federally affected areas, Die compromise measure provides 5440 million, compared with million in the vetoed bill. Chairman Carl D. Perkins, D-Ky., of the Education and La- bor Commitlcc, said a fight will be made in the House for addi- tion of about million to the compromise figure, including about million for impacted arcs school aid. Perkins said he will supporl such a move and that if it is successful, "1 don't think it will lead to another veto." Tlie Appropriations Commit- leo bill provides (or continuing Ilic present level of payments for "category A" students in federally crowded areas. These arc students whose parents work anil live on federal proper- ly. Tlie payment would be al 90 per cent of entitlement. Satellite Has Electronic Eye On Monique, a Wyoming Elk American Outflow Of Cash Growing WASHINGTON (AP) The United Slates reported today a deficit of billion in its balance of payments for 1969, the worst year on record. Department of Commerce fig- ures showed, however, a surplus of billion, seasonally adjust- ed, for the fourth quarter of 1969. The 1969 deficit, meaning that much more money flowed out of the country than came in, repre- sents a billion deterioration from 1968, which showed a sur- plus of million. All figures are adjusted for predictable seasonal charges and are for the liquidity bal- ance, which lakes account of changes in all U.S. transactions overseas. The official balance, which covers only transactions with other governments and central banks, showed a billion sur- plus in the last quarter of 1969 and a surplus of billion for the year, a billion improve- ment over 1968. By HOWARD BENEDICT AP Aerospace IVrlter CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (AT) They won't really talk, but Nimbus the space satellite is going to call up Monique the elk. Thursday, in Wyoming, the fe- male elk will be tranquillized by a drugged dart and litlcd with a veil collar containing electronic gear. For the next several months a space satellite will tune in on the collar's instruments twice R day and record the migratory habits of Monique and the nicmber elk herd she roams willi. It is hoped the experiment will pave the way for tracking many species of animals and birds to learn their habits, why and where they disappear at certain times and why some are threatened wilh extinction. Monique, called Moe for short, will be immobilized al the National Klk Refuge winter feeding area near Jackson, Wyo. Half an hour later, wearing her new collar, she should be up and about, showing no ill effects from the drug. She has been wearing n dummy collar for months to become accustomed U> il. Shortly before noon Thursday, the Nimbus 3 satellite will pass 700 miles overhead and dial Mo- nique's digital 16-bit number, 1000110I001100IO. The collar is lo respond by transmitting information such as the temperature in the area, Moo's skin temperature, the light intensity, her altitude above sea level and information on her movements. The data will be stored on a tape recorder aboard Nimbus 3, which was launched last April, and will be transmitted lo a ground station in Alaska. From there it will be relayed immedi- ately lo the National Aeronau- tics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center at Greenbcit, Mil. "The beauty of the experi- said Dr. John J. Craig- head, one of the investigators, WMTHEiT ESSA WEATHER BUREAU U 5, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE I We liter Map, Pi- ABILENE AND VICINITY radiui) Fair and warmer Mcnday arxf TL-esday, High Monday Mar low MontfBY 35 and hiflh Tuesday 70. Winds tight and varwWe, Hiqh and lovv fcr 24-hours trwJina 9 a.m.: 44 and Higti and low for saniE dale lasl year: arid 37. Suni-i Lssl p.m. Sunriie today; a.m. Sunset p.m. NE Where Is Record of Old Brands? By ELLIE RUCKER and BETTY GRISSOM Q. Can you tell me Ihe place where I would'write In Austin lo obtain the catlte brand my grandfather used In (he iSM's? AH brands had lo be rcglslcred and were scnl lo Austin, I undcrsland, where they are still on a permanent (lie. A. Contact the county clerk in the county in which your grandfather branded his cattle Through, research of the old brand books, you may be able (o find the information you desire.. We've been told therciisn't a stale brand recording agency. However it your grandfather was a member ofthe Texas Cattle Raisers Association, brands of its members are recorded as far back' as 5877. Write: Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, 410 East Weatherford St., Fort Worth, Texas 76102, for information. Q. I paid a T.V. scnlcc man (who guarantees service) W when f returned my set. I then found out It wasn't fixed. Aflcr he made five more attempts (o correct If, I couldn't stand to sec him mistreat my color scl and got someone else to fix it. How can (he people of Ihc Big Country be alerted lo check with the Better Business Bureau before calling any T.V. service? A. They have just been alerted by your letter. The public may call the BBB to check the reputation of any firm, if there is any doubt, before doing business with il. The BBB doesn't recommend any firm but will tell you it Ihe firm you arc planning lo do business with is reputable. Q. I would like to know If you can (ell me how (o get pictures and autographs of these following movie stars: Karen Valentine, Kdward Mulhare, Robert Cnmmlngs, Nina Foch, Paul I.ynde, and Pant Peterson. A. Autographed photos can usually be obtained from the agency handling the star. We have sent you the names and addresses of the-agencies handling the different stars 4 you mentioned. Another source for obtaining photos is certain stores, for inslance, in New York there are two which have a big supply and you might try writing them. They arc: Kier's, 1143 Ave. of the Americas, New York, N.Y. and Gotham Book Hart, 41 West 47th St., New York, N.Y. Q. I have been told that a graduating senior doesn't send graduation announcements to families who also have a senior. Is this so? Or does Ihls Just mr-Rn they do not send to friends who arc members of Ihe same class? A. All four of the local high school advisors agree that this is not a written rule of etiquette but is probably Just an understanding among the students. To invite the families of classmates would seem rather needless, since they will be attending lo see Ihcir own offspring graduate. One advisor says it is sometimes customary for classmales to exchange name cards among themselves but not announcements. Q. I would like to encourage a nlccc ol mine to continue her poetry writing. Could you tell me sonic magazine or company that will print amateur attempts? Also, are there teachers In Abilene who encourage students other than their own class room pupils? A. Dr. Slcma Bishop just started a class in amateur poetry writing at the YMCA (North It meets every Monday night for six weeks, from 7 to VI, The fee is and young people are welcome. Sorry, you missed Ihe first class last Monday night but Dr. Bishop says she will have makeup classes. Dr. Bishop advises the amateur lo start by trying to have his work published in the local church papers or bulletins. They arc usually happy to have anything that's beautiful and has a meaning. There is a "Writer's Market" at Ihe Abilene Public Library; this is a reference book that has a list of names and addresses of companies that will print amateur poclry. Address questions (o Action Line, Hnx 30, Abilene, Texas 79504. Names will not he used but questions must be signed and address given. (AP Wlrtpholo) SPACE SATELLITE AT WORK tracking elk in Wyoming liut "is lhal we can daily monitor elk at distant or remote loca- tions where it might be impossi- ble to go into the field and vis- ually watch her." Wilh the satellite information, officials hope to locate Mo- nique's posilion al any time within one mile. The herd is not expected to roam far from the refuge during the winter because Ihe elk are fed daily by National Park Serv- ice rangers. Hut in the spring they will head into the moun- tains. A female elk was selected be- cause females arc tamer than the males. Officials said males fitted with dummy collars oflcn tried lo get rid of them by scraping against trees or fences. And in Ihe mating sea- son, glands in a male's neck swell and the collar becomes uncomforlable. No Survivors Found Of 102 Passengers SANTO DOMINGO, Domini- can llcpublic (AP) No survi- vors had been found early today from a Dominican airliner which crashed in the Caribbean wilh 102 persons aboard, rescue officials reported. The passengers included sev- en U.S. citizens and 45 Puerto Ricans, officials of the airline said. The Dominican Airlines twin- jet DCS crashed into the Carib- bean about five miles off the soulh coast of the island of Ilis- paniola a few minutes after tak- ing off for San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sunday afternoon. The pilot had radioed that his engines were failing. The airline said tho U.S. citi- zens aboard, other than the Puerto Ricans, were John Payne, Chicago; Theodore Payne, Salt I-ake City; Ruth Atosto, New York City; Gilbert Hays, Florida: Francis Robert Downos of Massachusells, who Ciiy Secretary's Condition Critical City Secretary Lila Fern Martin is in critical condition in the intensive care unic of Hendrjck Memorial Hospital after suffering a brain hemorrhage, a Hendrick spokesman said Monday morning. Miss Martin entered Ihc hospital last week for tests, her office said. She suffered the hcmorrhaage over the weekend. lived in the Dominican Republic at Las Matas dc Farfan; and two Cubans who were natural- ized U.S. citizens, Emerilo Per- Accvedo and Conccpcion Nanson. Also aboard were 45 Domini- cans, one Spaniard, two Peru- vians, an Argentinean and a Belgian priest who lived in the Dominican Republic. Wreckage was spoiled about five miles offshore, and Domini- can air and naval unils searched for survivors through the night. An American search plane from Puerto Rico dropped flares over the If no survivors arc found. It will be Latin America's second worst air rash. Among those reported aboard was. a former world lightweight boxing champion, Carlos "Teo" Cruz, his wife and two children. Also aboard were the wife, daughter and sister of Gen. An- tonio Imberl Barrera, who as- sassinated Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo In 1961 and head- ed a ruling junta aflcr Ihe over- throw of President Juan Bosch. NEWS INDEX Amusements M2A Bridge................9A' Clossified...........7-1 OB Comics 6E3 Edilofiols..............28 Horoscope 4A Hospital Palitnts 16A Obituaries 6A Soorls To Your Good Health------9 A TV, Lot] 8A Women's News I......, 3-5B   

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