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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 26, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 26, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT NO. 222 PHONE 073-4271 ABILENE. TEXAS, 79604. MONDAY .EVENING, JANUARY 26, 1970-TWENTY-E1GHT PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Romney Doesn't Rule Out Senate Try 10c SUNDAY GEORGE HOMNEY HUD work critical WASHINGTON (AP) Secre- tary of Housing George Romney expressed liope today thai Mich- igan Republicans could agree on some candidate other than .him to inn for the Senate this year. But Romney. to take himself completely out of con- sideration for the. nomination to oppose the incumbent Demo- crat, Sen. Pliilip A. Hart. "Our department's new hous- ing and urban programs are al a critical state, and the national .program for voluntary action is about lo be Romney (old a news conference. "As a result, at this particular time can He hopes Michigan Republicans agree on some other candidate they require my complete alien- lion." ''Hopefully there can he agreement on someone else as a consensus candidate who can command the wide support, needed to win the lie said. Romney was asked why lie did not categorically rule him? self out of contention. "I don't think any human being can know willi absolute certainly what future events will lie replied. The former Michigan gover- nor said also that his wife Le- nore is not an active contender for the job. "She will not be a consensus candidate unless they cannot unite on someone Rom- h Court Denies zburq Review WASHINGTON (AP) Pub- lisher .Ralph Glnzbury was de- nied today a Supreme Court-re- view of a libel'judgment won against him by Sen. Barry Goldwaler, H-Ariz. Goldwaler had sued Ginzhurg and. Facl magazine for libel over an article during his 1964 presidential campaign that con- tended Goldwater had a para- noid personality and was unfit for the presidency. A U.S. District Court jury in southern New York returned a verdict for Goldwater awarding him in compensatory dam- ages and in punitive damages. The 2nd U.S. Court of Appeals upheld the verdict and Glnzburg asked the high court to review the case. The court today by a 5-2 divi- sion denied the request in a one-line order. Justice Hugo L. Black, with whom Justice William 0. Doug- las agreed, dissented and said he thought the verdict shoulld have been summarily reversed. Asks Friendly Continue Aid SAIGON President Van' defending his oil-criticized, ap- pealed tonight for continued aid from friendly nations, but said he will go his own way if the al- lies' policies do not accord with those of South Vietnam. In a major speech- to riewsT men and the Saigon. diplomatic corps, Thicu said that his coun- trymen must accept "a certain discipline" in wartime. "We cannot let -lite Commu- nists take advantage of our free- doms in pur institutions to. cre- ate disturbances, Id cause con- fusion 'and lo jeopardize our se- lie added. He said South Vietnam must gradually achieve self-sufficien- BSaze Deaf; Blind Man HASKELL (HNS) Calvert Pitlman, retired deaf and blind man, was seriously injured at about 8 a.m. Monday "as he attempted to light a slove at his home at-715 S. 7th St., according to a brother, Hut Pillman. The burned man's clothing caught on fire and his wife was making an effort to extinguish the blaze when "Dobber" Dodson of Jlaskell happened by and assisted her. The victim of the blaze was carried to Haskell Memorial Hospital by a Ifolden- McCauley ambulance. Mr. and Mre. Pittman resided alone, The 'Haskell Fire Dcpt. answered the call [or help but the victim was led lo the porcli of the home where his wife ant! Dodson extinguished the flames. No damage was done to the home. cy and self-support, but called for additional help from 'the al- lies. To lose South he said, "means the delerioria- lion of a whole big and secure area, namely Ihe free world. "Iliglit at the moment when the Republic of Vietnam needs Ihe support of the allies in this fierce struggle, the government is nol submissive. Neiiher will it one day follow the allies' policy-if we see that such policy or the liming of it is not in ac- cordance with our national leresls." He did riot hint ai what possi- ble differences he had in mind. Thieu was addressing a din- ner meeting of the Association of Vietnamese Newspaper Edi- tors. Members of his Cabinet, foreign newsmen and members of diplomatic missions also" at-' tended. Among them was U.S. Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker. The main thrusts of his speech were aimed, at those here and abroad who say he is running an essentially one-man regime, and at the frequently often press. He said: "In South Vietnam, while the soldiers are dying on the battlefields in order to. pre- serve democracy there are a number of people who seem to forget that we are in wartime, and are helping Ihe enemy wilh their statements and activities. Chief Justice Warren E. Bur- ger took no part in the case. Ginzburg's lawyers conlendcd that the judgment "casts a dark shadow" upon freedom of the press and that the senator had proved neither that tlie material in Die article was false nor that Ginzburg was motivated by malice. In another decision the Court ruled 5 to 2 today that a park deeded for while use in Macon, Ga., can be turned back lo pri- vate heirs to keep Negroes out. Justice Hugo L. .Black, speak- ing for the majority, said under Georgia'law the park may be turned back in deference lo Ihe wishes of the benefactor that not be integrated.. The decision involves Bacoiis- field Park-in. Macon, which was established under (he will of Ihe lale U.S.- Sen. Augustus Oclav- ius Bacon. He specified lhat it be operated for "while women, white girls, white boys and while children." In 1986 the Supreme Court ruled lhat if Hie park was lo be a public one Negroes could not be denied access. But Georgia courts followed by approving the return of the park to Ba- con's heirs. This is the decision upheld today by the high court. Black said: "We are of Ihe opinion that in ruling as they did the Georgia courts did no more than apply well-settled general principles of Georgia law to dclermine the meaning and effect of a Georgia will." ncy said. "Only in lhat event will she consider II." Mrs. Romney has been men- tioned as a possible candidate by House GOP Leader Gerald R. Ford, among others. Michigan Republican leaders will meet later Ihis week in SI. Clair in an attempt to agree on a candidate. Romney declined lo endorse anyone else specifi- cally for the nomination, and said he would not attend the consensus meeting this week. "I am very hopeful Ihey will unite behind another candi- he said. Romney declined to elaborate on his statement and would not say under'questioning whether and how far he has left the door open for possible candidacy. Michigan GOP leaders figured the former governor was the strongest candidate they could field against the popuar Harl and they wanted his decision quickly. Although he never really indi- cated he wanted Ihe Senate, Romney agreed to consider the race. He mel earlier this month with Michigan Gov. William Milliken; the slate's two most important members of Con- gress, House GOP Leader Ger- ald R. Ford and Sen. Roberl P. Griffin, and national Commit- leewoman KHy Peterson. Although he asked Diem for more time lo make up his mind, sources indicated the four party leaders left Romney feeling lie would remain as HUD secre- tary. Romney had constantly said publicly he was committed to the Housing job and his aides worked hard to dispcll specula- tion that he was frustrated wilh the relatively low priority given his department, by the White House. Speculation .cropped up..about, Mrs. Rqmney's dacy. about 10: days'- ago 'alter Ford said'she" had "some real 'potential as a Republican nomi- nee for Ihe U.S. Senate." The secrelaiy was quoted ear- lier in the Detroit Free Press as saying Mrs. Romney "wouldn't get involved unless it's impossi- ble for the party lo get behind some other coasensus candi- date." William E. Brennan, chief jus- lice of the Michigan Supreme court, was also considered a lop-runner until he declared last week that he would fill out his term on the bench. Another possible candidate for the nomination is conservative state Sen. Robert Huber of Troy. Another name mentioned is that of Rep. Donald W. Riegle of Flint. She's Donating Million Pointings Dancer Says She'll Stand With Art Registrations (approx.) Applications Mon 1969 Tolal Record (1358) Deadline Jan, 31. 243 By BUD SPRUNGER Associated Press Writer SAN FRANCISCO (AP) A curvey 46-year-old exotic dancer is giving museums her inherited collection of 211 impressionist proudly says she'll stand on display alongside them. "I aspire to inspire before I says Tullah Hanley, widow of wealthy investor Thomas E. Hanley of Bradford, Pa. She estimated Sunday that the paintings she is giving lo San Francisco's De Young Museum and some others to _a Denver museum are worth million al- together. "But who she added. The painlings Mrs. Hanley says she is donating out of appreciation for "this interest- ing and swinging city" include works by Gauguin, Manet, Ma- lisse and Renoir. They are "my children" and she is really "pulling them out for she continued. When Ihe display opens here in October, she plans lo be a major atlraction with them: "I have lo be on exhibit WEATHER U. S. DEPARTMENT Of COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Weather Pg. SB) ABILENE AND VICINITV ra- d'us) Ccnllrwed clear lo partly cloudy today, tonight and Tuesday. Warm alrernwxxs, cool nlflWs. High today, 70-75; low Icnlghl, near 40; h.'Qh Tuesday, near High and [ow for ending- 73 and 37. "I'm proud of my she said, adding (hat she wears "body-filling clothes" by design- ers such as-Pucci. She says she is giving the art works away because she be- lieves museums in the West dn not have enough impressionist works and that she hopes her gifts will prompt others. "New .York has plenty of mod- ern she declared, recalling lhat her late mil- lion collodion was shown there in IMS. Noting that she some'.imes has been called a belly dancer, she put up a strong disclaimer. "I do classical interpretive dances of places like Africa and Egypt even harem dances, but not belly dances. There are no bones in my body when I she said. "I can move on a floor like a snake." A Hungarian by birlh, she de- scribes herself as self-educated and a woman who purposely and successfully sel oul al 12 years of age to prepare herself for marriage lo an American millionaire. "I wanled lo be she said. Her Harvard-educated hus- band had inherited a gas and oil fortune and they were happily man'ied for 20 years, she said, before he died last April al 75. "He was a big Boy Seoul when we met and he remained a big Boy Scout to Ihe Fhe recalls. Paintings worth in- cluding a Cezanne and a Picasso, were stolen from their home but were re- covered a week later, wilh no arrest. Mrs. Hanley has written a book about George Bernard Shaw's love life and is planning another on art and love and says "it will include sex educa- tion." ,Iusl when she will get the lime is not clear since she was out dancing "in (his interesting and swinging city" until the ear- ly hours of this morning. ACE-HIGH STRAIGHT SHOOTER A U.S. soldier with the ace of spades stuck in his helmet moves down the slopes pC the Black Virgin Mountain, 55 miles northwest of Saigon. The ace of spades represents death and is left on the battlefield in an effort lo in- timidate the enemy. (AP Wirephoto) Earlier Try Not Believed Serious NEW YORK (AP) -L- A heroin addict who hanged himself in a city jail to commit suic-ide the day before but was returned to his cell because the attempt was not considered as serious. George F. McGralh, the city's commissioner of correction, said Sunday that Carlos A Rivera, 20, hanged himself at the Adolescent Remand Shelter on Hikers Island afler a prison psychologist decided an abortive suicide Iry on Friday.did not merit hospilalizalion of the youth. Instead, said McGrath, .Rivera was placed under "administrative segre- gation under special1 or alone in a cell and observed every half-hour by a guard in charge of about 50 prisoners. He was found hanged shortly after noon. Meanwhile, Rivera's sister, Mrs. Miriam Leohc, said in an interview that the youth tried twice in December lo turn himself in al hospitals for treatment of his addiction bul was turned away because of overcrowding. McGrath said that Rivera, who was arrested Jan. 15 on a charge of possessing a dangerous weapon, spent the next six days in a special observation riormilory and on the seventh was returned lo a regular coll on the advice of a prison physician the who found him stable enough for change. McGrath said Rivera might have succeeded in commiting suicide anywhere in the prison and that his belt, shoelaces and other potentially harmful articles were removed before he was found hanging by strips torn from a blanket. McGrath said the decision lo remove Rivera from the special observation dormitory was "entirely a medical judgment" and that he was not prepared lo say 'the psycholo- gist was wrong in making it. Rivera was the ninth person to commit suicide in a city prison in the last 13 months. NEWS INDEX Amusemcnls ]2A Bridge 6B Classified 9-I2B Comics 8B Editorials 4B Horoscope flA Hospital Patients 5B Obituaries 6A Spwls To Your Good Health 9A TV Log.............. 12B Women's News 3B Morning Water Not and 73. flr.d tow jama dald Inf vtar: Svniel lasl nkihl: junrlie today: unset lomgnl: t'M. By ELLIE RUCKER and BETTY GRISSOM. Q. Please, tell me why my tap water tastes like chlorine early in the morning? I can't use It for coffee. Later In Ihe day it's all right. What can I do? A. Bill Wecms, Abilene walcr superin- lendenl, says some people are more sensi- tive to the smell and taste of chlorine early in the morning. As (he day progresses it isn't as noticeable because we become accustomed'lo it. Fill your coffee pot and let it stand over night. All the chlorine will be gone by morning.-Or If you forget to do (hat just use Ihe waler oul of the "HOT" water faucet. Water lhat has been heated has no chlorine In It. Possibly your hoi waler pipe Is loo close lo Ihe cold water pipe. This could make the chlorine in the cold water rise to the mouth of the fauccl during Ihe night, making the first water running out have more chlorine in it. In Ihis case, just let in run for awhile before using, Q. I have about 200 National Geographic Magazines, as far back as 1917. Some have one year in a volume. They arc leather bound, I have Popular Mechanic magazines, also leather hound, ami some very old medical hooks. Who would be Interested in buying all or any of these books? A. There are two dealers here in Abilene lhal may be very Inleresled. They would like lo look at them and give you an csli- mate of what they arc worth. Conlacl them by calling 673-1361 and If you don't have any luck wilh them run a classified advertisement In the Reporlcr-Ncws Q. I have read your article on how street lights are added to streets. why arcn'l there slrcct lights on Texas Avc. and Danville Dr.? They are both highly traveled. A. Street lights aren't put up according lo the volume of traffic, says the Cily Traffic Engineer. Street lights are installed by pe- tition only. Even then there arc only a few inslalled in order to stay wilhin the budget, he says. Q. I have a good hairpiece purchased In Italy. I can't wear it hccause (he base Is too large. Is there any place that can lake the hnlr from the original base anil pul In on a smaller one? A; It it's a wire base a local salon operator says they can put. it on a smaller base for you, K nol, It'll have to be sent to a company in Dallas or lo a man in Tye that does this type of work. We have sent you the names of all three. Q. Why. ilncsn'l (he city of Abilene do something about the low hanging limbs over the sidewalks? One hit me In the fare Ihe other day. This could be very dangerous. A. The matter can be taken care of by calling (lie city hall at 673-3781. Report the location of the tree limbs to the Street or Traffic Dept. They will investigate artd have the matter taken care of. Or write the location to Action Lino and we'll call for you. Address questions (o Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 7360-1. Names will nol be used but questions must be signed niul address given.   

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