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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 16, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 16, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 80TH YEAR, NO.'212 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 70604, FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 16, 1Q70 PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Prass (fp) lOc SUNDAY By BLUE RUCKER and BETTY GR1SSOM What Is Revenue Of City Sales Tax? V. How niucli revenue, has Ihc city received from the'city sales tax? What -has the-clty done with this-money? In -'other words, 1 would like an accounting. 'A. Abilene has received from six quarterly; returns since the tax became effective April Returk from the first year was well above the initial estimate that the tax would bring in about The sales tax revenue-is put in with all Hie other general fund revenues, so City Manager H. P. Clifton says he can't say lhal the sales lax was specifically used for this or iliat. Ad valorem taxes were cufa.nickel aller the tax passed, and the council didn't Increase; Ihe-ad valorem rate the final 11 cents of. Hie 18-ccnt raise cited as necessary to pay for the 1967 bond election. It y'puld be pretty safe then, lhal the sales tax funds.have been used to pay for th'e bonds! The'paynient.on all bonds this year is .about higher than three years ago before the 1967 bonds were voletl. The -sales Max. probably 'had its mark on two other I'thlngs: The civic center was about .over the budget amount, and the city was able to go ahead willi (lie project 'Without raising taxes or borrowing. Also, the tax may. have had its influence on pay raises. Q. Why doesn't Abilene have a. youth center-for our teenagers? As large as ourfCljy'Is; there should be a place for klds.tfl go Irislead'of rurinlrig around and getting Into trouble. A; four recreation centers open to all: age gi'oups scailered throughout the city, arid on Jan..3.at Rose Park Recreation coffee hpuseithai the., teenagers planned themselves' wasTopenod; of the .City Parks and Recreation :Dept. said it's more practical arid 'economical for the City to build by more than just one Q. I'm concerned about my canary's plumage particularly after (he blrti'gdes through the molting process. What can be rtoiie to restore Ihe bird's brilliance? A. Just as the rrioll begins; or even a few days'ahead of time, if you are-good prediction's, start feeding him-this diel: Well-cooked hard-boiled egg yokes, two tablespoons of 'dried finely-crumbed whole- wheat bread, crackers, or toast, one half teaspoon of fresh bright paprika, three drops of olive oil. Mix to a paste and feed one-half teaspoon per day, with a veiy small quantity of-flax seed. Continue the usual supply of greens while offering this food for coloring. Q. I'have heard that the Speaker in Ihe House of Representatives can call for the affirmative vote and (hen bang his gavel and declare tlic motion carried without calling for (he "nay" vole. Is this true? 1 A. "No, the Speaker does not have Hie right to fail to call for a nay says State Rep. Frank Calhoun. "There are .occasions when in routine mailers the Speaker will ask the question "Are there objections" and if there are none then he vyill declare the motion or proposition passed. Of course, a single objection would Stop the proceedings and a full vote would be taken on the says Calhoun. Address questions to Action Line, liox 30, Abilene, Texas 79601. Names will not be used but questions must be signed and address given. NWS INDEX Amusements BB Bridge HA Clossified..........12-I8B Comics I' B Editcriols......-.....1 OB Horoscope 5A Hospilol Polienls........3A Obiruories.............2A Sports To Your Good Heolth-----5A TV Log..........------ 'SB Women's LEAPS AND LIVES John J. Croulz, 46, leaped from a him in a net. Croulz, who has a history o[ menial illness, after the leap. Bclcon Iricd lo talk Croulz out of jumping, downtown building in Fort Myers, Fla., Thurs- was admitted lo a Fort Myers hospital for observalion. In (Photos by Joe Warner of Ihc Fort Myers News-Press via day but was unhurt in the fall because firemen caught the photo at riglit, Ihe Rev. Fred Beleon comforts Associated Press) No Genocide Evidence Reported ia Observers Say They Didn't Look Very Hard A10RT IIOSENBLUM Associated Press.Writer An .interna- tional .learn reported had.fgundup evidence of gen- cclrle at.jlhe end of Nigeria's civ- il war, but ils members admit- ted under questioning they didn't look very hard. told'a news conference lhat Ih'cy spent only three hours.in Owerri and sev- eral olher towns Uia't were on the ..'periphery of Biafra's lasl territory and had to return to Lagos for. "urgent consulta- tions." The eight-man team of reprc- sentatives from Britain, Poland, Sweden and Canada flew to Port eastern Nigeria, on Saturday. Four men'went to- ward .Owerri and returned to Lagos Monday, the day Biafra surrendered.: The other four came back to'the capital Tues- day. Asked about the fowl situation in Biafra, Brig. Gen. John L. Drewry of Canada said: Coup Leader Takes Reins Of Government in Libya TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) Col. Muammar Kadafi, leader of the 'coup .d'etat that ousted King Id- ris and took' over lhis; oil-rich Arab nation Sept. 1, assumed to- day -the post of prime minister, and placed lour fellow officers in 'other key minislerial ppsls. Kadafi, presumably also continues lo head the Revolu- tionary .Command Council of 12 officers thai'has been runnnig Libya through a civilian cabinet since Die coup. By taking over the prime min- istry 'personally and pulling oth- er officers in the cabinet, Kada- fi appeared lo be lightening con- trol over operations of Hie gov- ernemiit as well us ils policies. The changes were announced by Tripoli Radio. The announcement said Mali- nioud Maghradi, a lawyer Testimony on Gun Ruled Out at Breck By ROY A. JONES n Reporter-News Staff Writer BRKCKENRIDGE Tha' testimony of a Graham hardware to the effect lhat R. Lee Thompson attempted. to purchase a gun from him last June ordered Vstricken from Ihe record here Friday i n Thompson's trial for Ihe June 7 murder of his wife, Helen. Judge E. II. Griffin instrucled the jury not .to consider Joe McKinley's testimony for any purpose, bul he overruled Defense Attorney's Payne Roye's motion for a mistrial on the grounds that McKinley's testimony deprived Thompson of a fair and impartial jury. Called by the defense as an "adverse parly McKinley took the stand afler Thompson had reiterated his claims of temporary insanity at the lime his wife was slain. McKinley. had been subpoenaed lo Ihe trial by District Ally. T. Jean Rodgers bul Roye was apparently attempting lo gel his icslimony out in the open before .Rodgers could call him lo Ihc sland. "I never did anything bul slap her and I never lefl a mark on the 54-year-old Breckenridge drilling contractor said of his late 40-year-old wife. A pathologist had testified earlier in Ihe week lhal Mrs. Thompson died of a brain hemorrhage caused by a beating, apparently "with fists." Asked by Roye if Thompson Sec TRIAL, Pg. 6A named prime itiinisler shortly afler the coup, had resigned. Taking up cabinet posts, along wilh Kadafi, the announcement said, were: Capl. Abdul Salam Jalloud, minister of interior; Capl. Bash- ir Sagln'r llawwadi, minister of education; 1st Lt. Omar Abdul- lah Meheishi, minister of econo- my and Industry, and 1st LI. Imhemmed Abu Bakr Imgaryof, minister of housing and munici- palities. Just five days Libyan newspapers published a list of Revolutionary Command Coun- cil members that included all four of these junior officers. Jalloud is generally consid- ered here Ihe No. 2 man in the revolutionary headed by Kadafi. Jalloud led Libyan dele- pa'.ions lhal recently negotiated the evacuation of British and U.S military bases here. The two British bases, in and near Tobmk, will be evacualed by March 31. Tlic big U.S. Wheelus Air Force base outside Tripoli will be evacuated and formally turned over to Libya by June 30. _____________ IVEATHElT Parity cloudy wl'ril'l'le In lemiMralure Ihiout1; Saturday. High loday, SS-40; low miWll, IHO; tiigh Saturday, 4MS. Light, vtruble wirjj. High and tor enulng 9 ml lasl nloM: today: Hjniel Israeli Jets Strike Inside Egypt By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Israeli air force planes struck Inside Egypt loday, hilling mili- tary camps and motor pools, an Israeli Army spokesman an- nounced. One Israeli aircraft was shot down and Ihc pilot was. seen bailing out over Egyptian leni- lory Iho spokesman added. It was the ihird air strike deep Inside Egypt since Jan. 7. The Israelis said Ihe one-hour strike was aimed at a number of military targets along Ihe Suez Canal, Ihe Gulf of Suez and on Ihe "Suez-Cairo axis" at a distance of 45 miles cast of Ihe walerway. The targets included camps and positions near Suez City and ri radar station near Bird Udcib, about 18 months south of Suez. The pilots reported a number of direct hits. The lost plane was knocked down by anti-aircraft fire. Ils make was nql identified. By Israeli count, it was Ihe ninth Israeli aircraft to have been shot down by the Egyp- tians since the 1967 six-day war. The Israelis began hilling lar- gets inside Egypt as far cast as Ihe Nile-Delia at Ihe beginning of (he year. Jerusalem leaders say the raids arc deterrent factor and nol aimed at (Ire ov- erthrow of Ihe Egyptian govcrn- 'mcht: President Gtfmal Andcl Nasr. scr's newspaper spokesman published in Cairo instructions purportedly from U.S. Secretary of Slale WUllam P. Rogers lell- irig American diplornals (o threaten Arab governments wilh loss of U.S. aid if their ac- tions at Ihe recent Arab summit conference wenl agalnsl Ameri- can policy. Hassaneln Hcikal, editor of Ihe semiofficial newspaper Al Ahram and a confidant of Nas- ser, said Ihc instruction was in the from of a Stale Dcparlment manual seni lo U.S. ambassa- dors in the Arab nations and England, Spain, Turkey, At- ghanlslan, France and Haly. "Those lhat are stupid enough lo go away "from the load are going lo go hungry There is food There is enough food that they will not rtic in 72 hours It is already in (he ground and on the trees.'1 Ho said there was an adequ- ate stockpile of high-protein food in Poi'i Harcburt. Tlic observers reported Nige- rian federal troops lire carrying food where it is most needed and refugees arc receiving it in orderly fashion. They said federal forces are dying lo get refugees back lo Iheir villages as soon as possi- ble lo begin repair work and plant crops before the rainy sea- son begins in March. Nigerian officials are ques- tioning refugees and it Ihey arc detaining men of mili- tary age to determine if they were prisoners of or mem- bers of the Diafran army, Iho report said, The report slated: "The ob- servers neither caw nor heard of any evidence of genocide in the newly liberated areas Tlic observers saw refugees at ABA, Mbawsl, Okpuala, Umudi- ki, Obiakibi and Oworri (areas Merke! Man Dies in War MEHKEL (RNS) Mr. and Mrs. Claude Warren of Mcrkel were notified Thursday of the death of one of Iheir sons, Air Force Maj. Tommy Hay Warren, in Vietnam. Iifaj. Warren was killed Jan. 15 when his F-4 Phanlom jcl was hit by ground fire white attacking a largel. The major was knocked unconscious. The pilot then declared an emergency and pro- ceeded to near Ubon, Thailand, the nearest basa. About 17 miles from Ubon tlic pilot ejected both himself and Maj. Warren but, according to the Air Force letter, Warren was (lead at Ihc time of ejection. 'Arrangements arc pending word from the major's wife, the former Sharon Hutchinsori, who lives in Tucson wilh her three children. Tommy Jr., 11, liccky, 10, ?nd Wally, C. Mrs. Warren's Mrs. Lola Hulchinson lives in Abilene at 1034 Fannin. One of Maj. Warren's brothers, Joe of Brady, said there is a possibility of a mili- tary funeral wilh burial to be made in a military cemetery. Surviving are his parents; his wife and Ihpae children; and two brothel's, Joe of Brady and fl. C. Jr. of Arlingion. Warren was commissioned a second liculcnanl at graduation exercises held at Bryan Air Force Base June 13, 1957. lie attended Markd schools until a freshman. He graduated from Abilene High Schoo'. and attended Hardin Simmons University prior to Joining lire Air Force. skirting Biafra's With the exception of (hose in Owerri and environs, lliey ap- peared to ba in good physical shape. This vyas confirmed in conversation'wllli a'member of (lie U.S. aid'relief detachment in ABA and by n doctor in Umu- dikl. Refugees seen In Owerri and walking down the Owcrrl- Aba road were not in such good physical condition. There were signs of maliintrlliilioH among some of Ihe children, but not extreme. The observers', Iho only independent group.to the military. operations' as the war been .long brinhcd from llirjilfcml.'' Col. Doiiglas Cairns of Britain said the team woukl rclurn lo the war area in the ncxl day or two lo take a longer Nigeria invited the observers lo look into allc'callons. of geno- cide 1C inonllis itgo. Thirty-six different officers, serving on n rotation basis, all said In'nu. morons- reports Hint Ihcy found no evidence of genocide. Ft Phantom Hill ion The Taylor Comity Historical Survsy Committee y o t c d Thnsday uighl to proceed wilh a projccl aimed at acquiring Ihe site of old Ft. Plianlom Hill ami converting it Into a park.. Mrs. V. C. Perini Jr., commil- lee chairman, named 11. IT. Wagslaff, Sid W. Binion and John Wright lo investigate possibilities of acquiring (he land on which llic frontier fort was localcd. The Phantom Hill projccl was one of five approved for study by the historical survey group. Olliers are: Acquisition of land in the near vicinity of (lie old Mountain Pass Sl.ilion, operated by Die Biiltcrficld Stage Line in prc- Civil War days, and erection of a replica of (he Klalion. (The silo is soulhwcsl of Merkel.) Erection of a marker at Lylle Gap, soulhwcsl of Abilene, a gap named for Cnpt. John T! Lyllc wlio drove more llian head of cattle up Die Cliisliolm Trail and Old Western Trail lo northern railheads. Erection o( markers ut Hie sites of old abandoned (owns in DM county, towns such ns Dcwcy (predecessor of Moro Inkum, Guion. Coats and Ibcris. Ercclioii of a marker nl Ihe sllc of thci. Eagle Colony, a German group which was brought lo a Lylle Creek sctllcrrwnl in early'days. The commill.ccH hi. a dinner meeting at Arthur's Cafeteria, voted .lo sponsor a lour of Taylor County historic silcs, possibly in April. The lour, according lo Icntalive plnns, would Include dedication of newly Irislalfcd historical markers. Leonard Moseley will be lour chairman. Attorney Wagstaff and Historian Hiipert N. Iticliardson, who have done the research for the markers, would describe -Ibi events which look place at the sites. Tlie tour would conclude with a picnic supper, possibly at the Perini ranch near Buffalo Gap. Conversion of Ihe old Ft. Phantom Hill site into a pork has discussed for many years by various Abilene civic and historical groups. Tlie old fort was established in 1851 on Iho Clear.Fork, a few miles norlh-nortlicasl of present Sec FORT, Pg. 6A Pill Condemnation Not Founded, Researcher Says BOSTON (AP) One of Ihe researchers who developed Ihc first oral contraceptive says condemnation of the pill based on Hie results of animal experi- ments is not well founded. "II is well known thai meta- bolic reactions in other species are nol easily transferable lo said Dr. John Rock, a Harvard gynecologist. Rock, 79, professor emeritus at Harvard Medical Schnpl, de- veloped the pill along with Ihc laic Dr. Gregory Pincus. "Effects contraceptive mate- rials have on laboratory ani- mals arc nol al all Indicative of how Ihcy work- on Hock said He said thai because Ilibrc are individual reactions lo (ho I'll] Hearings, 4A oral contraceptive' "jhe oral contraceptive can never be an over-the-counter "H must be dispensed by, per- sonnel who will remain In, close cojilacl .wilh ihc Rock said. He said that'the danger of the pill to a woman is not nearly as grcal as Iho danger of pregnan- cy. "Apprehensions of the statisti- cians anil biologists "are not .sharer! at nil -by practicing obstetricians' and gynecologists who have had extensive' experi- ence .'wilh ''the contraceptive 'during .Ihc Irist' 15 Rock sold.   

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