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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 7, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                i Abilene porter WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TH YEAR, NO. 203 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 7H604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 7, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Amounted lOc SUNDAY Transcripts Portray Mafia Police Infiltration By BOB DUBILL Associated Press U'rllcr NEWARK, N.J. (AP) Wide- spread Mafia infiltration of New Jersey police and to the point, of allegedly influenc- ing selection of a stale police portrayed in FBI transcripts of electronic eaves-- dropping filed in federal court here. Twelve volumes covering four years of recording name dozens of public personalities including Singer Frank Mayor Hugh Addonizio and Police Di- rector Doininick Spina, of Ne- wark, Stale Police Siipt. David B. Kelly Rnd former Supt. .Do- minic Capcllo, powerful Demo- cratic leader John v. Kenny, and stale Democratic Chairman Salvatorc Bonlcmpo. The Iranscripts, produced Tuesday in the extortion trial of reputed Mafia boss Angelo "Gyp" DoCarlo. loll of payoffs In public officials, loansharking and gambling operations, ski- matte from Vegas gambling infiltration of the tele- phone company and the Mason- ic lodge. The transcripts were, made public by U.S. Judge Robert T. Shaw over vigorous defense-ob- jcclions. Shaw reserved decision on whether they could be used as evidence in the trial. Among highlights nf Ihe docu- ments: Stale police An FBI memo- randum said "il appeared that Kenny had Capcllo appointed stale police superintendent through Gov. Richard J, Hughes al DcCarlo's request. Kenny agreed to have Capl. David Kelly appointed superin- tendent to succeed Capello at DeCarlo's request." Payoffs Capello anil Spina are named as having received payments. The transcripts also talk o[ pay- ments to Middlesex county po- lice and David T. Wilenlz, coun- ty Democratic leader. Election Decarlo raised mnnov for Adonizio before his election as Newark mayor in 19G1 alter 14 years as a congressman. The transcripts indicate DcCarlo and associates worked to gel Michael "Mickey" Bontempo, brother of tile stale Democratic chairman, out of Ihe race. "Kayo" Kon- igsbcvg, a Bayoiine ioanshark now in prison, lalked with Dc- Carlo about getting money for Jamaican hotel if there were a possibility or gambling. Konigs- berg is quoted: "I'll see Sinalra and have n talk with him." Sina- tra is fighting a subpoena and an arrest warrant, from the Stale Investigations Commis- sion which called him in its in- quiry into crime. one of many references to dealings with Ne- wark's mayor, DcCarlo is quot- ed: "Hughie helped us along. He gave us the city." Addonizio was recently indicted on extor- tion and income lax evasion charges, l.as is quoted as saying Clerado "Jerry" Cate- na, reputed head of a Mafia group, received from "skimoffs" of Las Vegas casi- nos, a skimoft is illegal diver- sion of casino profits. several refer- ences to the Democratic strong- man, Ihe late Joseph "Little Joe" DeBenedictis, an Essex County political figure, is quot- ed as Idling DeCario: "If we get this Kenny Okays Sec MAFIA, T'g. 12A Blue Mercury lunges to 11 Even Ihe mercury turned blue early Wednesday as il recorded the coldest temperature in over three years here, 11 degrees. Reached between 6 and 7 a.m., the temperature marked at (he Abilene Weather Bureau was the coldest since Ihe 9 degrees of Dec. 29, 1965. The 11-degrec mark malclies the average lowest temperature computed over the previous 19 winters. Other overnight chillers in Ihe Big Country included 3 at Ballinger, if al Easlland, 12 al Anson and 16 at Breckenridge. Abilene weathermen promised n slight warm-up loday and 3 Marooned Workers Plucked From Tower HOUSTON (AP) Wally Bor- rics never envied Ihose guys who sit atop flagpoles for rec- ords, but he nwy have topped them Tuesday. 48, of Houston, was stranded for nine hours atop one .of Ihe' lallcsls .lowers in Texas while o'ne'pf the toldest weather Jronls Ihus far this winter moved in tp keep him -.jpgmpany. The radio lechhician [or a Houston firm was rescued about p.m. by a Coast Guard heli- copter from atop (he KPRC radio and television low- er near Dcwall. "I finally quit shaking about 20 or 30 minules said Bor- ries from his hospital bed p.m. His chilling experience began about 8 a.m; Tuesday as he rode an elevator to the top of (he tower for some repair work. About 900 feet up he spoiled ice, lie said. The higher he went, the thicker the ice became. About 10 feet from the top, the elevator suddenly began to drop. It didn't drop fast, but "it was too fast to.get out of he said. Borrics finally managed to slop it with Ihe emergency switch and then climbed, to-'a shack al the lop to await a'res- cue. He had a small electric healer with him. "It's lucky I did have il with lie said. "I managed to keep one foot warm at a lime. I'd swap hands around loo." A spokesman for KPRC said a steeplejack company was called and two men went out to liy lo fix the elevator. II look them two hours lo climb the lower. They couldh'l gel Ihe elev'a- lor lo go up or down, so Ihe Coast Guard was called lo the rescue. The helicopter lifled all Ihree men from (he tower in. a net. Israeli Jets Hit Targets Near Cairo TEL AVIV (AP) Israeli warplanes struck at Egyptian military targets near .Cairo to- day and crossed west of Ihe Nile River in (heir deepest air as- sault since the 1967 Middle East war, the Israeli military com- mand announced. One of the objectives was Da- hashuv, eight miles south of Hel- wan, a Nile River cily where a gigantic steel complex is being built with Soviet aid. Dahashur and at least one of the other centers of the Nile Delta reported hit in the attack are 17 miles from Ihe Egyptian capital. Israel claims often lo have sent planes over Cairo on recon- nassance, but there has been no record of air attack so near the capital since the six-day war ended. All Israeli planes returned safely, a spokesman said. There was no mention of what damage was inflicled or how long Ihe raid lasled. The Israeli planes met no in- terference from Egyptian jets or antiaircraft fire, the Israeli command said. Among the targets were In- shas and Tel el Khabir-bul by NEWSWOEX Amusemenls 6A Bridge 7 A Classified 6-9B Comics 5B Editorials 4B Horoscope 7A Hospital Palicnls 12A Ohiluarics 3A Sports A To Your Good Hcallh------7A TV Loo. 8A Yeomen's News 3B far the most significant was Da- hashur. It lies close lo Helwan, where the Soviets arc reported cooper- ating in a expansion of the steelworkers signed to become the biggest sleel mill on the African conti- nent. By atlacking Dahashur the Is- raeli planes penetrated about 70 miles wesl of the Suez Canal, by far Ihcir biggest penetration since the IM7 war. Inshas was one of Ihe first Egyptian airfields Iiil by Israeli planes at the si art of Ihe six-day war, when (he Arab air forces were virtually wiped out in a lightning Israeli strike. It was listed as one of IM-lfl leading Egyptian airfields at that time. In Jerusalem on Tuesday, De- fense Minister Moshc Dayan cs- limaleri lhal Israeli forces have killed Egyptians in fight- ing along Ihe Suez Canal since April. Thursday, wilh lemperatures expected lo reach highs of about 40. Following lows nf 17 and II the past two nights, tonight's low should be somewhat of a relief; il. should be aboul 20. A vast rtome of cold air set- tled over Texas today, plunging lemperatures as low as zero. A natural gas pipeline failure occurred in South Texas but ap- parently caused no emergen- cies. Officials for the Cily of Del Rio and neighboring Air Force Base said the pres- sure came back up around mid- nighl and no unusual problems occurred. Del Rio police said the gas lines were a liltle inefficient because of the failure but said no emergency conditions exist- ed. 22 Not Exactly Tropical Though It's warmer downtown. So thinks Troy Sampley, .vice president of Citizens National Bank. There was some head- scratching going on early Wed- nesday morning as.the Weather Bureau al Municipal Airport was recording a shivery 12 de- grees and the bank's telephone service was saying it was 22 degrees. At the same lime, the bank's outside temperature sign. was also showing 22. A check was made of Ihe ther- mometer which runs the recorded telephone announce- ment. H is on top of- Ihe South- western Bell Telephone office next door to the bank. The ther- momelcr on top of the bank which runs the sign was also checked. Neither showed a mal- function. "This can happen, I under- stand, at very low tempera- said Sampley, a retired Air Force colonel. He is a pilot and, although he doesn't claim to be an expert, has taken some wealher instruction. He also speculaled that heat from downtown buildings may have had something lo do with Ihe situation. It has been said that only a barbed wire fence separates West Texas from the North Pole. "I lhal fence must have blown down al Ihe Sampley said. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wrilher Mip, Pg. HA) ABILENE AND VICINITY lo par My cloudy and not quite so cold today and .unigj-.l; IncrtAs'tng eloudfrveBj and cofd TliuruJay. High today And Thursday, near 4; low lon'-ghl, 50. winds lighl and variable today. Outlook for Friday, cloudy and cold. High and low lor 34-hovrs ending 9 a.m.: 32 and n. High and low lame dalt (Ml year: AJ and 33. Suplift Past nighl; wnrlsc today: Junsfl ton-phi: Kagle Pass schools closed be- cause of Ihe gas problem, but police said (hey knew of no emergency conditions that exist- ed because of il. At lirackeltville, officials at the Kinney County Courthouse said as far as they the gas failure caused no serious problems. The current cold wave result- ed in the selling of a new gas consumption record in Dallas. Lone Star Gas Co. reported that Dallas residents used 000 cubic feet of gas during 24 hour period ending at mid- night. WHO'S CHASING WHOM? This monkey Slaiiled allcndanls weren't for a few min- escaped from lus cage in a city park al Alamo- ulcs if they were chasing the monkey ov the gordo, N.ll., llien gol his hands on one of the monkey was chasiiig Ihcm. [AP Wircphoto) jiels adciulanls were trying lo capture him with. Corsicana Teenager Insists Icy Journey Lasted 5 Days BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) A Teen-aged boy from Texas who barely survived imprisonment in a refrigerated, railroad-borne Inick trailer, insists, though with foggy recollection, that his ordeal lasted five days. His father, a veteran (nick driver experienced with refri- gerated equipment, contends, however, that no one could sur- vive more than 24 hours of thai confinemenl. .Icsse-N: "Billy" Parker, 15, of Corsicana, Tex., and his fath- er Jesse Sr., 39, spoke to a re- porter Tuesday at Mercy Hospi- tal, where Ihe boy was respond- ing lo treatment for exposure, shock and froslbite. Workmen at the Niagara Frontier Food Terminal discov- ered the youngsler lying naked and unconscious Monday on crates of tomatoes that nearly filled the 40-foot-long trailer. The container had been car- ried "piggyback" on a railroad Pedestrian I Is Ki CROSS PLAINS (RNS) A Colcman resident, J. T. Croft, was killed in a pedestrian-pickup Iruck accident on Stale Hy. 36 four miles east of Cross Plains about 5 a.m. Wednesday. Croft had boarded a bus in Abilene early Wednesday, arrived in Cross Plains about 4 a.m. arid had begun walking loward Rising Slar when the accident occurred. Driver nf Ihe Iruck was not known at mid-morning. Stevens Funeral Home in Coleman was to receive Ihe body Wednesday where funeral is pending. flatcar since leaving Nogales, Ariz. Dec. and had been kept al a conslant 45 degrees to pre- serve the produce. When rushed to Hie hospital, the boy had a heartbeat so faint lhal blood could not be laken for a lest. His body temperature was estimated at 82 degrees, well below the range of normal clinical thermometers. Billy rallied Tuesday, liis tem- perature rose to a normal 98.6 degrees and he was transferred out of the intensive care unit. Doctors listed his condition as fair. The boy gave differing ac- counts on how he happened lo enter the trailer, bul in each case he said il occurred at p.m. New Year's I'.ve in Corsi- cana. In two versions he said he was chased by two boys near the railroad yards after deciding lo lake a walk. In a third slory, he said tie rode for a while on the flalcar carrying Ihe trailer then went inside the container because it was relatively warmer. He said he did not know how the trailer's door wa.s closed and insisted he had nol removed his clothing, even though they were found in the conlainer. Billy said he subsisted on to- matoes during the journey. "Thai's all 1 he said (iiiicl- ly. "I never grew so sick of to- matoes in all my life." "I don't think he stayed in Ihe Irailer more lhan 2-1 Parker said. "Based on my ex- perience, 1 don't think he could have lived in there longer lhan that." Billy's close call was nol Ihe first he has had in his young life. lie recovered from encephali- tis, an often-fatal disease also known as sleeping sickness, only to be severely injured in an automobile accident in Decem- ber, 1968, during which he suf- fered brain damage, lie was hospitalized in Gnlvcslon, Tex. for months after Ihe crash, Iris father said. Although giving Hie hospital staff full credil for its work in bringing Billy back from near death, a relieved Parker said quietly: "I think Hie good Lord had more lo dovilh it lhan anything else." Judge Rules Against Sundaco District Judge Raleigh Brown Wednesday morning granted a slate's molion Fnr a permanent injunction against the operation of Clark's Discount Center on Sunday by Sundaco, Inc. In lus decision. Judge Brown called Ihe Sundaco operalion "an ingenious .scheme to evade Ihe statute (the Sunday closing law recently upheld as con- stitutional by Ihe Texas .Supreme Sundaco officials have unc allnrnalive if they plan to open this weekend, however, he said. If Sundaco's allonicys file immediate notice of appeal and request the selling of a supcrsedeas bond, Ihe operation may conlinue unlil final judgment has been rendered in the case, he said. Asked when he cxpccls nnlice of appeal, Judge Brown smiled. "By about 2 o'clock this aflernnon, 1 would he said. Gas Chamber Foes Seek to Save Girl's Life Hy EI-UK nt'CKKR and KKTTVGRISSOM Why So Few Mail Boxes? Q. We gc( good 'postal service, but (here arc limes when we want lo mall lellers In (lie evening. Is (licre a big reason why there are so few mall boxes in the south pai I of the City? We had a box on S. llnl ami it was removed a few .months ago. 'A. Postmaster (Irani says many residential area collection boxes have been removed because the volume of mail'didn't warrant keeping (hem..The trend.Is to cut clown on (lie number ot collection boxes because mail can be processed and dispatched more quickly if it's brought lo Ihe main post office, he says. There are still some, collection boxes placed arnund (he city (usually in shopping centers) bul Ihe lasl collection al these boxes is at G p.m. Q. Where miglil I nblaln glider Irssons? How much would they cost? Is (here a glider cluh or association In Ahilone and hnw old must I he (n fly a glider (I am Is It possible to rent a glider oni'O a license is obtained arid If so what arc I he rates? llciw many hours of Hying lime arc needed for a license? A. Whew! You're full of questions, bul here may take glider lessons Ihrough the Abilene Soaring Assn.; flight time is free, bul there's an instructor charge of per hour, plus low plane expense 'of ahout SI. Yon must be H to obtain a Student Permit which allows you lo take lessons and snln (you jnst made Then after 50 flights lhal total 10 hours of flight'time, yon can nblain your private Glider Pilol Certificate, hut you must be 16 lo qualify for this. Fnr informalinn aboul Ihe Soaring Assn., call Kd Templclon al 672-6M7. Q. Where can I find some pure copper rings and bracelets In Abilene? Please, Id me know snon; I nerd Ihrm badly. By RORKRT H. REID Asoclalcd Press WrHcr RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) Mar- ie Hill is 18, a high school drop- out, a reform school ycleran and black. She is awaiting death in Ihe gas chamber for Ihe murder of a while slorekeeper in-Rocky Mount on Ocl. 7, 1968. Opponenls of capital punish- ment who say Marie would nev- er have been sentenced lo die if shu were arc campaigning lo save her life and have Jhe death penalty abolished in this slate. "This case is a good example of injuslice for blacKs in North said Leon While, ex- eculive direclor of Ihe Norln Carolina Commillec nn Racial Justice. '-'Our intent is to ger a new trial for Miss Hill and lo eradi- cate this evil system. It's for the blacks and Ilic poor anyway Nine persons now face tlie gas chamber in Norlh'Caiolina. All bul Iwo arc black. Miss Hill's chief supporters include White's or- ganization of Negro ministers fi- nanced by the United Church nf Ihe slate chapter of Ihe Southern Christian Leader- ship Conference. A number of her supporters have formed a separate organi- 7ation, Hie .Marie Hill which is planning a series nf statewide demonslra- llons in her behalf. Some of Miss Hill's supporters say they belicVje she Is 'innocent, Olhcrs merely claim no Ifi-year-oM should die, no mailer what Ihe crime. During her trial, Miss Hill pleaded innocent and said she was nol In Rocky Mounl on the day of the killing. She was ar- rested 19 days later in Dillon, S.C., and was brought to liial in Edgccomhc Counly Supcrioi Courl Ihe following December. A Rocky Mount policeman lold Ihe conrl she had signed a statement admilling her guil1.. A biracial jury dclibcr.ilcd. one hour following Iho Iwo-dny trial and brought in a conviction. Had she would have escaped the gas chamber, because under North Carolina law al Ihe lime, such a plea in a murder case carried a mandtory life sentence. Sonic of Marie's backers pri- vately admit they don't think Miss Hill will ever die for the crime, (iov. Hob Swill, who has Ihe power lo uonimulc Ihe sen- tence, is an announced foe of capital A. We have mailed you the name of a jcwolrr who carries Ihe topper bracelets. You didn't say whal they were badly needed for but if it's for arthritis or rheumatism, a local doctor suggest you don'l depend on gimmicks instead of seeking.proper Ireat-. menl. Some people get a chemical reaction on Ihe skin from copper. Coal Ihe underside of Ihe bracelet with clear nail .polish'or varnish. Address qiirsllnns (o Action Hnx TMfH.'NaniM will nol' be used hut filiations niusl ,lic signed ami address given,   

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