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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 6, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 6, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 89TH YEAR, NO. 202 PHONE G73-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79G04, TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 6, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press lOc SUNDAY 17-Degree Low Chills Abilene AN ICY BLAZE Abilene fireman. Carroll-.Miss Alle.ne lone occupant, of. the Garvin checks the roof of a'house-gutted; by.'-House, died in' the fire.' -Photo by Don fire Tuesday among icicles which withstood the Blakley) blaze as temperatures dipped to Woman is First 1970 Fire Fatality By ELLIE RUCKER and BETTY GMSSOM What Were First Funds of Uncle Sam? Q. Before income (ax was established for (lie Individual, where did the gov- ernment get operating expenses? A. It relied on customs duties for the bulk of its revenues during most ol oiir history. Excise taxes (mainly on liquor and tobacco) and inheritance tax also supplied revenue. Q. For (he first moon landing, Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin was listed as Lunar Motliile Pilot, but it was (apparently) Neil Armstrong who did the actual pilot- ing of the craft while it.was descending on the moon's surface. Is the title Lunar Module Pilot just titular and If not, why doesn't lie pilot? A. The relationship of commander and Lunar Module Pilot can be compared lo pilot and co-pilot of an aircraft. The Lunar Module Pilot operates Hie LM guidance computer, monitors spacecraft systems, and advises the commander of maneuvers needed to modify the landing approach for a pin-point landing. Both pilots have hand- controllers and duplicate attitude and velocity displays, and it's entirely possible for the lunar module pilot to make the actual touchdown. However, in the preflight crew training cycle, the commander receives the greater part of the training for powered descent, approach, and lunar landing. In any case, there is ample work for both men to do during the entire period the LM is manned from undocking through lunar landing and ascent back into orbit to rendezvous and redocking, says John McLeaish of NASA. Q. Sometime ago I read (he meaning ot each leaf in a four-lcaf.clover, but my memory draws a blank on this now. Can you ilnd out what each leaf slands for? A. Ella Higgison wrote a few lines in "Four Leaf Clover" that might help to refresh your memory: "One leaf is for hope and one is for faith and one is for love, you know, and God put another in for luck." Q. A few weeks back (here was a request for information concerning a charter trip to Hong Kong or Bangkok. A Irip Is now being formed and was an- nounced In tfic Army Times. Do hope you can pass this Info on lo Ihe lady re- questing it. Thank you. A. THANK YOU! We've sent her a letter with your Information and in case someone else might be interested we'll print that information you sent us right here: A charier trip to Bangkok is planned [or March 15, 1970. Round trip fare is flight originates in Atlanta, Georgia and will spend 2 weeks in Bangkok. For further information scru a siaiaped, self-addressed envelope to; GLADYS J. STANLRY '5502 Mesa Drive Fayctlcvillc, N. C. 28303 Military persons, their dependents, retired military, civil service and other government employes are eligible to participate In this. Address questions (o Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79601. Names will not be used but question? must be signed and address given. An alderly Abilene woman be- came Abilcnc's first fire fatality of 1970 as an early Tuesday morning blaze destroyed her frame, home at 6i2 Plum. The body .was identified as Allenc C. Oakes who was found lying on the bedroom floor between two beds. The body was taken to Elliott's Funeral Home where funeral is pending. According to Police Investigator Jack Diekcn, Miss Oakes, an elderly woman, lived alone and apparently has no local relatives. He said attempts were being made to contact a brother in Denver, Colo. The fire was reported by off- duty police officer Bobby McCowen at a.m. Five units of the Abiene Fire Department fought tlie blaze 45 minutes before it was extinguished in 17 degree cold. Apparent cause of the fire was a leak in a gas hose connected lo an open space heater located on an cast bedroom wall, according to Dieken. There were five fatalities by fire in Abilene during I960, the first occurring March 17, according to Fire Marshall Len Blackwood. Astronaut Bean Forbidden to Fly SPACK CENTER, Houston 12 Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Ihe fourth man to walk Hie surface of Ihe moon, has been grounded and forbidden lo fly airplanes. A space agency spokesman said Monday Ihe astronaut was grounded "for administrative reasons." He declined to elabo- rate but said a more specific reason may be-rcleased later. Bean would make no comment on the report. Grounding.of a flier is usually for medical' reasons; bul Ihe spokesman said that Ihere was no. medical ailment involved. Administrative grounding could be a punitive action for operating an aircraft in an un- safe manner, or it could result Schedule Muskie HOUSTON (APj-U. S. Sen. Edmund Muskie, the 1968 Demo- cratic vice-presidential nominee from Maine, will be the keynolc speaker Sunday for the annual meeting of the Associations of American Colleges. from failure of proficiency tests, a spokesman said. Bean, a Navy captain, is a former jet test pilot with thou- sands of hours in jet, propeller and helicopter aircraft. He has flown 27 different air- craft during his aviation career and once told newsmen he lias had no major crisis in flight. Bean was the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12, the second moon landing mission. Flying with Charles Conrad Jr., Bean landed on the moon lasl Novem- ber. The Iwo astronauts walked on the moon for about eight hours and then blasted off its surface to rendezvous in moon orbit with the third Apollo 12 crewman, Richard Gordon. The trio were all promoted (o captain after the flight. Bean and others in the aslro- naul corps use T-38 jets to com- mute from the Manned Space- craft Center lo Cape Kennedy and to the other space centers. The grounding, in effect, pre- vents Bean from flying his air- craft alone between (he various centers. The coldest temperature since New Year's Day, 1909, was re- corded by the Abilene Weather Bureau early Tuesday as the mercury shivered down lo 17 de- grees, matching last year's reading. The 17 degrees, reached at a.m., was by no means the coldest temperature c v c r recorded here; a minus 9 occurred Jan. 4, 1947. Temperatures in Ihe Icons were notched all over the Big Country. Unofficial overnight lows include Eastland, 12; Ranger, 13; Snyclcr, 14; Haskcll, 15; Winters and Ballingcr, 16; and Breckcnridgc tfnd Stamford, 17. Although warmer tempera- tures were predicted for Wed- nesday, area residents should prepare for more biller cold when the temperature is expected lo plunge lo abnul 15 degrees. High today should be about 30 and tomorrow, 40. Monday, snow flurries were reported in Knox City, Cisco, Haskell, Winters and Dublin. Freezing rains of .21 in Dublin pul an icy glaze on the sur- roundings. Also reporting rain Monday were Stcphcnville, .21 and Comanche, .15. Icy conditions in the Dallas area Monday caused delays in flights there, subsequently passing on the delays to oilier locations. Both Texas Inter- national and Air Texas flights to Abilene from the Dallas area were delayed Monday. Tuesday morning, Tr flights from Dallas were arriving on schedule to the Key Cily, although one Air Texas flight during the morning was late. An Air Texas spokes- man, however, said later nights loday were expected to be on schedule. Texas temperatures dropped (o a severe one degree above zero aboul dawn in parts of Hie Panhandle today, the Weather Bureau reported, while all of Texas suffered from low tem- peratures. Some schools closed. A few of the severe tempera- tures included 2 above zero at Dalhart, Amarillo 3, Lubbnck 8, Alpine and Marfa 10, Big Spring 11, Wink 12, Childress and Midland 14, Wichita Falls 15, Abilene 17 and Mineral Wells 18. The cold weather brought icing to many places. Dallas police reported 200 minor, ice caused traffic ac- cidents early Monday evening, but Ihen the rale slowed and a dispatcher said today, "I guess everybody slaycd home lasl night." At Sherman, police reported 13 accidents before midnight. Amarillo police said accidents Ihcre during the night brought the number of fender-benders to 250 for the week. Aboul Hie only area of Texas escaping freezing temperatures was the lower Rio Grande Valley. Glazed highways resulted in WEATHER cancellation of classes in Mar- shall and Waskoin in Northeast Texas. The Highway Depart- ment reported dangerous con- ditions on several highways. Three schools closed in Tar- rant County. Forecasts called for slill lower (cmpcraturcs by Wednesday morning, but llicrc was no threat of more precipitation lo make travel hazardous. A backwash of light snow was slill falling in extreme northeast sections of llic stale in the early morning, but precipitation had ended elsewhere. Hazardous driving conditions remained in effect for an area surrounding Tcxarkana. Skies were expected to con- tinue clearing from West Texas eastward during the day, with precipitation in all sections end- ing by evening. Extremely cold temperatures were forecast lo continue, however, and freeze warnings for tonight were out for virtually all areas ol tiio stale. The Weather Bureau said a warming trend should begin by Wednesday morning. Loans Hit Record By JOE rOUNS Hcportcr-Ncws Business Edllor in both Abilene and Taylor County banks established an all-lime record al the end of 19C9, a report called for by the Comptroller of Currency and the Stale Banking Commission as of Dec. 31 showed. The on loan at Ihal time compared with Ihe all- limc record of al midyear of 1KO for Abilene banks and the at the end of set Ihe county record previously c s 1 a b 1 s h c d al midyear 1060 of Abilene banks had on loan a year ago and as n[ Ihe third quarter call on Oct. 21, 1969. Deposits in Abilcnc's five banks arc up million over the third quarter call lasl year, but the fourth quarter lotal of is million bolow the all-lime record established a year ago. The all-time record of was established Dec. 31, 19G8, while the third quarter call of Ocl. 21, 10G9, revealed in the five Abilene banks. DEPOSITS 4th Quarter 3rd Quarter DM.31, Oa.11, 1969 1969 Abilene Uotinial-...... Bank of Commerce 9 640 430 Citizens Nalional 66624675 Pirsl Nolioiwl 65 614 905 Fiisl Stole TOTAL ABILENE F M Nalional, Meikel Home Stale, Trcnl Firsl Stale, Tuscola TOTAL 3 RURAL BANKS 4th Quarter Dec. 31, 1968 896 4.338.800 4.160.397 667.496 3.518.480 TAYLOR COUNTY TOTAL LOANS 4th Quarter 3rd Quarter 4tli Quarter 31, Oct. 21, Dec. 31, 1969 1969 1968 Abilene Nolionol 5 Bank of Commerce Cilizens Notional First Nalional......... 34.329.358 First Stole TOTAL ABILENE...... 11 69' 6 F 8, M Nalional, Merkel Home Siale, Trent...... 293.918 First Slale, Tutcola..... TOTAL 3 RURAL BANKS TAYLOR COUNTY TOTAL Bumpy Landing Foils Hijacker WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE E5SA WEATHER BUREAU [Wealher Map, Pg. 3A> ABILENE AND VICINITY radius) Far and colder today and tonight; fair and Wednesday. High today, 30; low tonight, 15; Wcdneiday, O. Northerly 13-W m.p.h. dfminlshinq lon'qht Wednesday. OulkxA for Thursday, ctear lo par and warmer, High and low for 74 hours Pr.ding 9 a.m.: 43 and 17. and tow same dare last year: 61 and 37. Sunset lasl night: sunrise foddy: sunset lon'ghl: JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) A man attempting to hijack a Delta Air Lines DC9 to Swilzcr- i land was thrown off balance by an intentional bumpy andmg at Jacksonville Intcrnahonal Air- port today and overpowered by three passengers. Authorities said (lie man, identified by Hie Duval County Sheriff's Office as Anton Fun- jok, 41, of Evansvillc, Ind., was held on an assault to murder chargp. Roburl Starratt, chief (if investigations for the sheriff's department, said Ihe would-be hijacker altcmptcd [o seize con- trol of the plane as it ap- proached Jacksonville by push- ing his knife to the throat of stewardess Sharon Bcrcsford. Tlie flight originated in Orlando. Pilnt M a. r. j c.c Kucn7'e slammed on his brakes unneccs- sari, whm t d thmwing Ihe man ,XCC Slarratl Three passengers immediate- ]y jumped on him, Slarrntt saitl, and overpowered him. Tlie offi- ccr identified the passengers as Charles D. Slrimple, an off-cluly policeman from WillanI, Ohio; Franklin Dale Hall of Orlando, a salesman; and W. J. Ilillard ol Green Bay, Wis. Hall's shirt was slashed by the knife (luring Ihe struggle. Slarrctt said he had an uncon- firmed report Miss Hercsford was cut slightly. Tight money and the fact that Komo deposits have been going inlo more lucrative government bonds have affected Ihe total deposits in banks, some of (he bankers said. In Taylor County's eight banks there was on deposit as of Dec. 31, 1969, as of Oct. 21, 1069, and as of Dec. 31, 1968. John Wright, president of the First Ktale Bank, said that "although the measures taken to combat inflation may bj undesirable at the time, these steps arc necessary to insure Hie long range stability of our economy. "Aside from national problems, we have been fortunate lo acquire new industry for Abilene.. Also established f irms are expanding." The decade of the 70s, in Wright's opinion, holds great promise for Abilene. "A real indication of this was the surge in Christmas buying, indicating real optimism on (lie part of the Wright added. Leroy Langston executive vice president of the Citizens National Bank, said 1969 lias been a ralher significant year in the banking industry. "A very light money situation existed throughout almost the entire year and it appears this same situation will carry over as least as far as we can see inlo 1970. We arc very optimislic about Abilcne's future and our only handicap will be the availability Sec BANK, Pg. 2A Abilene Deposits Over the Years YEAU ...........DEPOSITS 1930 1931............. 1932 1033 1934 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 injn ,nn 547 22795456 066344 5IX252J8-19 C5, 239, 613 1952 5954 W Stoppage Urged to Honor Slain Union Leader CLARKSVILLE, Pa. (AP) Police said loday they had no clues in the triple gunshot slay- ing of Joseph A. "Jock" Yablon- Mine Workers Union insurgent, and his wife and daughter in their home. Meanwhile, Yablonski sup- porters in his recent unsuccess- ful bid for the UMW presidency urged a nationwide coal mine work stoppage to honor his memory. The blood-splattered, pajama clad bodies of Yablonski and the two women were found Monday in their colonial farmhouse on the outskirts of this small coal town, Dr. Ernst Abcmalhy, chief pathologist at Washington, Pa., Hospital, said the 59-year-old Yablonski, whose body was sprawled on the floor of an up- stairs bedroom, had been shot live times. Abernalhy said 38-caliber slugs were recovered from Ya- blonski's right wrist, head, right breast and throat. The fifth slug was found on the floor. Yablonski's wife, Margaret, 57, was found on a bed In Ihu same room. She had been shot twice In the body. The daughter, Charlotte Joanne, 25, was found'in an ad- joining room. Abernathy said she had been shot in the head. "I would say they were dead probably a minimum of three days but more likely four Abernathy said. Asked whether he thought there was more than one killer, he replied: "I would certainly believe there was more than one per- son. These three murders couldn't have.been done by one man because then he would have had to stop and reload." Ho pointed out that nine shots were fired while a .38 caliber pistol holds only six cartrigcs. In Fairmont, W. Va., Harry I.. Palrick, cochairman of a min- ers group which supported Ya- blonski against incumbent W. A. "Tony" Hoyle in Ihe election, said a meeting would be held to- night to urge a nationwide coal mine work stoppage in the Pcnnsylvanian's honor. Patrick said the group also had sent telegrams to President Nixon and members of the West Virginia Congressional delega- tion urging a federal investiga- tion of the slayings. Police said telephone lines lo the Yablonski house had been cut and (ires on two family cars had been deflated. There was no sign of a struggle and police rilled wit robbery as a motive. The killings were discovered by Yablonski's son, Kenneth, an attorney. He told police he went the house after repeated calls were unanswered, bul that this was not unusual because his father traveled extensively and wis frequently out of town. "Tnjs js a icrriblc who defeated Ya- blonski in a Dec. 0 election that tappcd one ol the most hitter campaigns In the union s Iniilo- ry. 195G 1957 1958 1950 19GI 1D62 19G3 106 1 139 260 698 1065 143594055 1067 19G8 1M9 IVTIiTC' TlVTFkTi' V I, W I 1 1 Vi HUM kJ ILMr tJJ.1 4A Business News 6A Bridge IDA Classified 6-8B Hororapo 7A Hospiioi Poiicnis 3A Obiiuorics 2A Sixxts .._... i M TV Loo 83 3B   

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