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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 6, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 6, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 82ND YEAR, NO. 173 ABILENE, TEXAS. THURSDAY MORNING. DEC1 PAGE ONE Nat many of us ever write a poem for real, much less beck Not .many of us get to ap- proach our 87th year. But Mrs. Leland Clayton Bar- bee, new Abilenian, has done both at about the same time. She was 86 on July 1 last. She has off the press her first book, "Selected Poems by Le- land Barbee." Mrs. Barbee is, as of the last few weeks, an Abilenian. She moved here from Hous- ton to be closer to her son, Ben Barbee, division president of Paymaster OH Mill Co., Pay- master Feed Mills and Paymas- ter Seed Farms. She is a radiant, witty woman, a delightful person with definite ideas about the advan- tages of old age. Do you mind mentioning your years as some women do? Mrs. Barbee was asked. she exclaimed. "I'm proud as Lucifer of it .1 have lived this long to sell the joys of old age." Mrs. Barbee, christened Hat- tie Leland Clayton, was born in Tupelo, Miss., la 1876. She is a sister to Will Clayton she sparkles, "I certainly must have some Identity other than Clayton's sister.' She was reared in Jackson, Tenn., and was educated there, including graduation from "Memphis Conference Female a Methodist school, She remembers her graduation speech with glee. Horse, a Horse, My Kingdom for a Horse" was her topic. She was married in 1897 to Dr. John Taylor Barbee. Mrs. Barbee was a fine violin- ist, a traveler and a writer, for personal pleasure, for many years. Her book of poems was many years in the malting. The book is dedicated to her two children, Ben, and Leland (Mrs. Hubert W. Hill) who is now In Paris where her hus- band Is doing work for the American government while on leave from his teaching post at Dartmouth. The poems, as her other writ- Ings, range from the light and witty to the serious, an expres- sion of her own varied person- ality. DAY MORNING. DEC! 00 >UR PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS---------------------------------- (ff) Kennedy Says Adlai Has Full Confidence TROY DEWAIN JEAN admits homicide also GLEN RAY DOVE 29 burglaries Pair Admits 41 Burglaries Here The plight of two Abilene men lene, who pleaded guilty in Court- arrested late Monday night in tt Bonham Elementary Scho broadened Wednesday as bo pleaded guilty to previous mi demeanor charges and signe statements in connection wi about 40 local burglaries over th past three years. George Maxwell, 42nd Distri Attorney investigator who ques tioned the two Wednesday wi the aid of City Investigator Harol Emerson, said the total cash take in all the burglaries amounted t about plus a large amoun of merchandise not listed in d< tail in the statements. Troy Dewain Jean, 19, of S. 6t and Elm who pleaded guilty ui bounty Court-at-Law Wednesda ja negligent homicide in the Oc 28 shooting of Mrs. Janet Mau rine Frye, 16, of Abilene signet a statement in connection with 1 burglaries and a theft. Glen Ray Dove, 21, of Rt, 3, An Fire Nib 'Red Barn' Her writings' and her work for Hungarian refugees are two examples of Mrs. Barbee's ac- tivities at an age some call ad- vanced. "I was an old, sick woman when I became interested in the she says. She had undergone four oper- ations at Houston when by a chain of circumstance the plight of the Hungarian refugees was brought to her attention. She began to help, to find jobs for those who needed jobs, to help strangers become adjusted to a new land. Hanging on the wall of her apartment in Elmwood West is a citation from the American Hungarian Federation for "hav- ing done the utmost to help our Hungarian refugees." Below it sits, in gorgeous costume, a Hungarian doll which was given her with the citation. A further recognition of her work is In Johns Hopkins Hospi- tal at Baltimore. A refugee, a Hungarian, who knew of her work named for her the re- search area where he works. He has sent along pictures of it And the work being done in "The Leland Barbee Tissue Cul- ture Lab." Work and interest in others, those are essential to "the joys of old Casey's Little Bed Barn on E. Highway 80 was damaged by fire about p.m. Wednesday. Ap- proximately 15 customers were in the restaurant at the time but none was injured. Damage was expected to be costly. An employe said the fire started in the kitchen oven. Fire units confined the blaze to the kitchen and section of roof over the kitch- en but the remainder of the building received heavy smoke damage. Two fire units extinguished the blaze. Sections of the roof on the west side, over the kitchen, had lo be torn away by firemen to prevent the spread of the blaze. W. N. Casey, owner of the res- taurant was not available to give an estimate of the damage. at-Law to driving with his license suspended, signed a statement in connection with 29 burglaries. Court-at-Law Judge Theo Ash assessed Jean a fine of ?750 and Stevenson's work at the Unite' Dove a fine and three months Nations, particularly during th in jail on their guilty pleas. Ash explained that by law the jail term has to run concurrently with any other jail or prison term Dove might receive but that the fines have to be either paid or served out separately. Dist. Atty. Nelson Quinn said Statement Comes Alter 'Soft' Charge By JAMES CARY WASHINGTON Fres dent Kennedy Wednesday steppec into the controversy s w i r I i n around Adlai Stevenson's Cubar crisis views with a letter mal ing clear the U.N. ambassado would continue in his post. you It goes without sayin have my fullest confidenc and best Kennedy wrote He expressed admiration fo Cuban crisis, and credited him with an active role in forcing th Soviet backdown that eased th threat of nuclear war. The letter from Kennedy to Stevenson, sent Tuesday reached the ambassador hat the two also have four-year probated sentences on burglary :harges in Lubbock and that a jibbock district attorney plans o move to have the probations re- He said this action probably wil taken on the basis of the pleas to the misdemeanor charges while action is being awaited by a 42nd District grand jury on burglary harges filed Tuesday in connec- ion with the Bonham School. Quinn said the cases will prob- bly be taken before the grand ury in January. He said he does lot plan to file more charges gainst the two now but will take IB other burglary cases before IB grand jury. As listed in Jean's statement, urglaries and approximate dates ncluded: Ruth's Cafe, 800 block of S. 1th, three times three years go, last year and this year. Mom's Cafe, 1050 Oak, three mes three years ago, last ear and this year. Dairy King, 3309 S. 1st, twice ;st year. Smitty's Auto Supply, 1041 N. ockingbird, once last year. A service station at S. 14th an arshall, no date. A service station at S. 7th an utternut, three years ago, night abou noon Wednesay. It was the lat est development in the uproai kicked up by an article in the cur rent Saturday Evening Post thai pictured Stevenson as having ad- vocated a soft line during the Cu- ban crisis. Co-authored by one of Kennedy's close personal friends, it raisec speculation over whether Steven son was out of step with the ad- ministration and might lose his job. Stevenson denounced the article as inaccurate. The "Dear Adlai" letter, an ob- vious effort to quell the rumors about Stevenson's future, was read to newsmen by Pierre Sal- See ADLAI, Pg. 2-A, Col. 3 OVERLAPPING ANNEXATION AREA Map above shows in shaded portion about 990 acres that have been annexed by both Tye and Abilene, Tye's action com- ing two days before Abilene's. Dotted outline at left shows what were believed to be Tye's boundaries by Si: Abilene officials when the annexation ordinance was drawn up. Solid outline encloses boundaries of Abi- lene's annexation, with a thin strip west of Dyess AFB not shown. WEATHER Bonham Elementary Schoo onday night. (The theft of a coin machin< om the Lawson Automatic Laun See PAIR, Pg. 2-A, Col. 3 GOODFELLOWS: Some people believe in mira cles. Others in extreme need have turned to Goodfellows with re quests for performance of a niir aclc. Letters seeking help for Christ mas continue to flood the Re porter-News office, one of which Mid-Tex Supply Co. 'Miracle Workers' Need Assistance explained. "I have not written be tore now, I thought there coulc be a miracle. The Goodfellow fund still needs if it is going to reach the goal of set for this year. The money is to be used Mrs T F. crisham to provide food, clothing and toys Employes of Western Chevro- br destitute families In the area Wednesday's contributions raised the total to Contributions may be made to MM. L8UND BAKBKC it N he Reporter-News and will be Mrs. J. Cross White acknowledged by publication. Mr. Mrs. W. A. Expressions of gratitude, mixed Mrs. J. M. Hooks with requests for additional help continue to arrive. "I hope you remember as she is one writer said. "Thanks a lot. I think this Is a wonderful thing as I received help last year from you." One 12-year-old boy wrote ask- ing for presents for his four brothers and sisters. Homer L, Morrow J.OO Mrs. Kate N. Thrane 10.00 Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Swenson 25.00 The Grover Brocks 5.00 James M. Hollcy 5.00 Foremost Dairies Automotive Shop Employes 25.00 Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Morton 25.00 25.00 Anonymous 5.0( Anonymous 1.01 Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Burton 7.00 Mr. k Mrs. E. W. Berry 10.00 Normandy Club 7.50 Upper Room Class Fair Park Methodist Church 5.00 25.00 let-Cadillac Co. 100.00 Mr. fc Mrs. Jesse E. Walker 10.00 Henry Weltman Mr. Mrs. B. M. York 5.00 10.00 25.00 Mr. 4 Mrs. W. A. Alexander 5.00 10.00 1.00 5.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 Enough Dolls; Dressers Needed "We've got enough dolls Irs. Bill (Donna) Shannon said Wednesday, following the latest cluge of donations to the Good- ellows. "But now we need help in dress- ng them." Anyone interested in dressing a 1000 do" that will go under the Christ- 54o mal of Mine less-privileged A 12-year-old girl wrote asking Mr. 4 Mrs E W Bowman 20 00 ctlilo  ABILENE AND VICINITY (Radius 40 miles) Generally fair and warmer Thursday, becominf partly cloudy on Fri- day. Hkh Thursday 60, low Thursday nighl 35, high Friday 70. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Fair Thursday and Friday. Warmer Friday. High Thursday 49-59. NORTHWEST -TEXAS: Fair and warmer Thursday. Clear to cloudy Friday. Jivarm soutn turnin, 54-60. Tye, Abilene Both'Annex1 Some Area of 990 Acres Wed. a.m 37 38 TEMPERATURES W _______ ___ High and low for 24-hour? ending 9 p.m.: 52 and 34. High and low same date last year: 51 and 45. Sunset last night: sunrise today: sunset tonifiht: By BILL SHELL Reporter-News Stall Writer An overlapping area of abou 990 acres in recent annexation, by Abilene and Tye has left city officials of both cities with a prob- lem of "where we're going to pu Mayor Bill Mauldin said. He said jes for the area to be annexed the fence." The overlap came to light dur- ing the week after Abilene City Commissioners approved on first reading an ordinance Nov. 15 an nexing about acres west of Abilene, extending to the city limits of Tye. Just two days before Abilene's annexation, Tye had either com- pleted 'or initiated annexation Teens Increase Jobless Number WASHINGTON unex- lected increase among job-hunt- ng teen-agers sent the nation's inemployment rate in November jack up to its highest point of reduce unemployment materially. 962. The Labor Department an- nounced that unemployment in. reased by about to 3.8 million, some more than easonally expected. Employment leclined by more than but The city commissioners said UU was at a record for the month hat to give all the city employes t nearly 68 million. Seymour Wolfbein, Labor De- artment manpower director, said e had no immediate explanation or the extra unemployed een-agcrs, except that it ap- peared to be concentrated mostly mong male youths seeking their irst jobs. Wolfbein discounted the report s a 'sign of economic weakness. saying "by and large the economy is holding up very well." He add- proceedings that included all o the overlapping area, which in eludes more than one-fourth of thi area also annexed by Abilene. The timing of Tye's annexation was "just a coincidence" Tye that in the words of a farmer in the Tye area, the two cities are faced with a problem similar to that of two farmers who have to decide "where we're going to put the fence." Mauldin said that after Abi lene's annexation, a woman in the overlapped area asked him, 'Am I in Abilene or said Mauldin, "1 told her I didn't know, and I still don't. It wasn't until Wednesday that Mauldin delivered to Abilene city officials a map of what Tye be- ieves to be its boundaries. Abi- ene Director of Public Works Jack tlc-Uanicl has estimated that it will require a week to 10 days to check land descriptions on peti- ions by Tye landowners who have been annexed and to draw up a ed, however, that employment is map showing the exact of not increasing sufficiently yet to he overlapping area. After that he map require study by Abi- lene's legal department to deter- mine "where we're going to put the fence." In explaining tow the discrep- ancy came about, McDaniel said that when he worked up boundar- by Abilene, there was no way of knowing that Tye had extended its wundaries. His reference for boundary work was an official U.S. Census Map and a 1953 U.S. lensus Map and a 1938 U.S. Geo- detic Survey map, he said. A brief outline of annexations by Tye in the past year has been See ANNEX, Pg. 2-A, Col. 4 NEWS INDEX SECTION A Sports 12-14 Oil MWI If, 20 SECTION I Women's 2, 3 Food nows 4 Obihiorits............ S, Radio-TV logs 12 TV Scout 12 Amuiementl 14 Comics Editorials Farm iwws, nssristt ------21 'Killer' Fog Blamed With 60 Deaths; More Feared LONDON (API A choking smog tightened an icy grip on .ondon Wednesday night and 200 lospitals were told to stand by for a major disaster. The Weather Bureau said the sulphurous pall was as thick and polluted as the great killer smog which caused at least deaths exactly 10 years ago. Scotland Yard reported more hail 60 cases of sudden death ince Tuesday morning, most of them chest or heart sufferers. Some had collapsed and died .on the streets. Visibility over most of southern England varied from 50 yards on the coasts to zero In some London suburbs. Dense fog stretched over south- ern Scotland. ljlr W11WB., The Weather Bureau reported no LONDON BOBBY sign of the fog lifting. wearinc MIHW mask >ew re> This is as bad as the 19521 ported. a spokesman said. "It has The smog was at its peakl Twenty piled 19 on OM not lasted as long yet but the fog for four days. This one let Intnulh Uwtai artery. Twelve Is as thick and polluted u It wasITuesday-and the government td-lcrathed together a Irak !Ml then." 'entitle research department laMte (be north. its lethal sulphur content already is higher than in 1952. The Health Ministry warned old people and children and all per- sons with chest or heart diseases to stay home if possible. The capital's airport and 60 miles of docks stood silent and unusable for the second straight day. Huge traffic jams piled up in the evening rush hour. Curtailed rail and subway serv- ices were choked with coughing commuters, some taking three hours for a 30-minute journey. Hundreds lined up at to buy smog masks, white game coverings for the note and mouth. The gauze filters out the bigger smog particles. After a few boon wear it turns back.   

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