Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 1, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 1, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               Winters 14 Crane 29 Big Lake 38 B'fteld 19 K.CIfy 20 Ok'union 35 Wall Branch 22 Bellaire 24 Rockwall 28 Van A'yne 17 Donna U MM I mi .Sbilrnc WURDAY FINAL-' 82ND YEAR, NO. 168 'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO ABILENE, TEXAS, E SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT I 1, 1962-TWENTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press SINKING SHORELINE This is a typical scene Fri- day as a ravenous Atlantic gnawed at 'miles of shore: line to topple log seawalls and swallowed huge chunks of oceanfront property at Daytona Beach, Fla. (AP New Oil Import Control Okayed WASHINGTON Kennedy approved Friday a new oil import control program which bases import quotas for.the area east of the Rocky Mountains on domestic production rather than total demand. The changes apply to imports of crude and unfinished oils and fin- ished petroleum products other than residual fuel Officials said they would make little change in the amount of licensed imports during the first half of 1963 and do not affect overland exempted imports from Canada and Mexico. Reporters were told at a White Import Control Proclamation is sued March 10, 1959. This provides for a new formula to limit imports of crude oil, un- finished oils, and finished prod- ucts, other than'residual fuel oil to be used as fuel, to 12.2 pei cent of domestic production of crude oil and natural gas liquids produced east of the Rockies dur- ing an earlier six month period. Imports limits for the January- Offj, June period of for instance will be based on a formula taking into account domestic production in the January-June period of this year. The Independent Petroleum As House briefing that the Of America said Ken would not during the next six nedy's proclamation "will result months adversely affect zuela or any other foreign nation so far as could be foreseen. It was stated that thc amount and the in a significant improvement in program. Association President Harold meaningful oil import 15 or 50 Aboard Killed In Idlewild Plane Crash 4-Year Term Won in UN By U Thant By MILTN BESSER UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (AP) U.N. General Assembly unanimously elected U Thant on Friday as secretary-general for an additional four years. In the works were boosts in pay and allowances that will bring the Burmese diplomat a year in his post. Delegates in the 110-nation as- sembly cast secret ballots ratify- ing an earlier unanimous recom- mendation by the Security Coun- cil that Thant's term be extended until Nov. 3, 1966, and the word "acting" dropped from his title. Immediately after the vote the 53-year-old former schoolmaster- journalist was escorted from an office behind the podium to the assembly rostrum. There assembly President Mu- hammad Zafrulla Khan of Pak- istan, a Moslem, greeted Thant, a Buddhist, and told him "it is for me a great joy" to be the first to offer congratulations on the election. Applause rippled through the great blue and gold assembly hall. Thant then addressed the as- sembly, reaffirming his oath of He stressed his concern for re- the United Nation's pre- iringing :risis. financial an end _____ of licensed imports for the first Decker's statement added that half of 1963 would probably actual ly be a few thousand barrels more than the total allocation for the first half of 1962. Other officials said the total al- location for licensed imports in the first half of next year would probably be about barrels daily, about more than in the first half of 1962. The President issued a procla- mation amending the original Oil "naturally, domestic producers are disappointed that imports were not reduced substantially as we have long advocated to restore the domestic industry to a healthy rendition." Decker found these bright spots in the change: "1. Although imports in the first half of next year will be approx- Sce IMPORTS, Pg. 13-A, Col. 1 Disaster Scene Covered by Fog NEW YORK four-en- gine, propeller-driven Eastern Air groping through a behind-schedule ILines plane, (dense fog to SAMPLER Soviet Deputy Premier Anastas Mikoyan samples a bit of food dur- ing a visit to a Rockville, Md., supermarket Friday. Mrs. Anatoly Dobrymn, wife of the Soviet ambassador to Washington, is beside him. (AP Wirephoto) New Steps to Eliminate Cuban Threat Reported landing, crashed and burned Fri- day nieht at Idlewild Airport. At least 25 of the 50 persons aboard were killed. More than a score of survivors were accounted for. Some even walked away, leading one near- hysterical onlooker to exclaim: 'God, it was a miracle." The plane was Eastern's Flight 512 from Charlotte, N.C., with 45 passengers and a crew of. five. It lad flown from New York to Charlotte earlier in the evening, and departed on its non-stop re- turn trip at p.m. EST. The airliner was due to land at Idlewild at p.m., but it was stacked up over the field for a .ime and came down nearly an lour late. Thc fog at Idlewild was Ihick when the doomed plane ar- rived that other airliners ahead of it were immobilized on the field, waiting for airline vehicles WASHINGTON (API acrin! reconnaissance. er Soviet step toward full elimina- lion of the offensive threat in Son and Cuba was reported Friday. But two the Congo days of talks with Soviet First Deputy Premier Anastas I. Mikoy- an ended without evidence o! of this latest step in meet- ing Khrushchev's promise to elim- inate the threat of offensive weap- ons in, Cuba came a few hours after Mikoyan concluded a final agreement to end the Cuban crisis which last month moved the world close to nuclear war. But U.S. officials took a wait-and-see attitude. After the working lunch session, progress toward agreement on a I Dean Husk. alter miKoyan concmueu a n- nviwa hour talk with Secretary of State Mikoyan told newsmen the talk r-.__ MnH i-Biioivt nvpr a varietv I had CVAf IIATFD I JlMJll. -inal Cuban settlement. j The Soviet official told newsmen of East-West issues including d.s- US authorities told newsmen he expects "some progress" in armament and Berlin as well Friday night Soviet medium-1 thc difficult efforts to conclude a I Cuba. ____ range bombers in Cuba are being and readied for ship- ment back to Russia. These 750-mile range planes can irry nuclear bombs and are re- ardcd as offensive threats to the nited States, although not sol angcrous as the 42 nuclear rock-j ts which the Soviets pulled out: the Communist-ruled island I arlier this month. There are believed to be about of the llyushin-23 jet bombers Cuba and Premier Khrushchev radioing to an American Airlines plane above the field. The airliner came down on Idle- wild's north-south instrument run- way. It hurtled off the concrete or some 200 yards and burst into flames. The rear part of the fuselage remained intact. However, the .lain section of the plane split and wreckage was scattered over a wide area. Fire Commissioner Edward Thompson reported from the air port: "Remnants of the plane are strewn all over the scene." Soft sand, reeds and tall grass hampered the search for sur- vivors. The heavy fog also slowed rescue vehicles to a 5 m.p.h. crawl. They had to be guided across the airport by policemen on foot. Some lost their way. Two stewardesses aboard the plane were listed among the sur- vivors. At the hospital, they ap- peared groggy but not badly hurt. It was the sixth major airplane crash in eight days. Previous disasters beginning last Friday uciu, waning claimed 181 lives in the United to find them and guide them to states. West Africa, France, Brazil the terminal. The field was closed peru time, but reopened before nation's worst single plane disas- ter last March 1 when an Ameri- n Jamaica Bay near the airport. All 95 persons aboard were killed. WEATHER Indians Digging in Despite Red Plans for Withdrawal ut t s assume w ater and will be Known through ern Cornwall to prepare for evacu- By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Still digging in defensively, In- dian troops waited tensely Satur- day for the tied Chinese to make good their promise to begin pull- ing back from positions along the Himalayan battlefronts. Red China insisted the with- drawals would take place on schedule and authoritative sources reported the Indian government had Indications the Red Chinese will pull back. But it may be days before In- dian forces can ascertain whether the Communist units are doing what they say they arc. fire -and troop withdrawal. The .broadcast said these pro- posals were contained in a letter led Chinese Premier Chou En- ai sent to Prime Minister Nehru on Wednesday. Chou again asked Hehru to agree to formation of a demilitarized zone along the so- called control line "and the estab- ishment of checkpoints by each >art on its own side of the line... md the return of captured person- nel." In New Delhi, a government spokesman said Chou's letter added nothing to previous Red Ti3L iney suy uicy aiv, Indian officials felt that until thc neither accepted nor rejected. lodcu noming 10 previous ncu mo vuiucaa aim Chinese proposals which India has the northeast. This in itself wii situation clarified there was high danger of an incident that could spark renewal of the heavy fight- Ing that brought Peking's forces to the edge of India's populous plains of Assam. Red China reaffirmed its inten tions in a Defense Ministry com- munique issued Friday and broad- cast by Peking radio early Satur- day. The conditions were thc same as when Red China imposed a cease-fire along the battlcfront Nov. 21- Thc Chinese troops, thc commu nlquc said, will pull back miles behind what Peking call; the line of control of Nov. 7, 1959 Thc broadcast also called on In dla to "promptly take correspond Ing measures" to Peking's cease- vhich it did not control before; the Chinese launcher! their fall cam- paign. AP correspondent Conrad Fink reported from Tezpur, corps head- quarters in northeast India, that verification of the Chinese pull- >ack will be hampered by the dif- icult terrain in the Himalayan tills and poor communications in hat isolated part of India. A top-level Indian army inform ant told Fink late Friday night that there has been no physica contact for some time between he Chinese and Indian units in India has made plain, however, that it objects to a Chinese pro- vision which New Delhi says would leave Peking in control of square miles of Indian ter- ritory in Ladakh, in thc northwest, NEWS INDEX SECTION A TV Stout 2 RoJio-TV tut 2 Sporti S-t Obltuorici 10, 11 Oil new. 12 Aimiicmenlt 13 StCTION I WOITKII'I MW> ........2, 3 4 Church Mm........... 1 Cumffi 7 Firm MWI, iMtfcMi II near the front. make verification difficult bcausi t is impossible to say from jus! where the Chinese would be pull: jack, the informant said. no indication in Tez pur what thc Indian army plans .e. any va rated territory. That is clearly p political question thc military if leaving to New Delhi. But officers in Tezpur made plain that no military man likes to let th enemy get too far out of touch be- cause his intentions then arc more difficult to guess. Nor was there any sign of mill tnry letup on the part of the In dians. Trenches were dug Prldaj near nil public buildings in Tcz pur, and India continued to scm and equipment to area i Nov. 20 assured President Ken- edy they woukl be removed wiih- i a month. Friday's presumably ob- lined from aerial lid nothing about any of the lanes being placed aboard ships ut it is assumed this will come 18 Hospitalized By Chlorine Gas for a time, but reopened before Flight 512's arrival. The Idlewild control tower saic the pilot gave no indication of can Ail.nnes Boeing 707 jet trouble aboard when he accepted on takeoK and expl0ded clearance to land and started in. The ship was on instruments be-1 cause of the weather. One of the survivors, Irving Strom of New Kochelle, N.Y., who escaped with facial injuries, said there was only an instant of warning to the passengers who had fastened their seat belts pre- paratory to the landing. "We did not have any warn- ..ip." he said, "except just at the last moment. Then I thought he was trying to take off again." A veteran pilot at Idlewild, who declined use of his name, said of the landing: "It. was just like uies I Cloudy with occasional light .Jin showers throuKh Saturday evening. Partlv cloudy to cloudy Sunday. High both days 60-65, low Saturday night 45-50. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS Cloudy Saturday and ind drizzle west ing spreading at a minute's notice. Of sairl the order would be CORNWALL, Ont. ly chlorine gas that escaped fromjfic'-1- .given if winds shifted and pushed a tanker car (nwn 18 persons lo the hospital Fridaj night, and officials prepared foi mass evacuation of a heavily pop ulatod section of Cornwall. Radio stations broadcast special )Ullctins to residents of northeast- You'll Want to Read these Sunday in We Visit SANTA ANNA This Sunday we ore in Coteman County's Sanla Anno, which lies in the shadow ot thc lamed and historic Sonta Anna Mountains. Besides looking ot the towns colorful post we will visit its active school system, its city govern- ment, and look at its chamber of commerce program. if New Toy Tea Abilene. Woman's Club New Toy Tea will be featured on the cover page of thc Women's Section Sunday. The benefit lor thc Goodfellows will be held Friday. Inside, a prof.le or the Woman's Club president, the woman whu guides the 600 member organization. if Historical Nuclear Experiment Painstaking research went into the world's first nuclear chain reaction on a University of Chicago squash court 20 years ago. AP Writer Sid Moody chronicles this historic experiment in the first of o two-port series in the Sunday Reporter-News. The second installment will appear the following Sunday, if Holiday Cooking and decoration Ideas arc shared for homemokers planning a festive Christmas season, Latest Sport News and Gala Christmas Parade deadly gas toward town. The gas hung in a heavy yellow fog over a large area of the city's outskirts. Police had already evacuated a small area and sealed off the northeastern outskirts of !ornwall. At least two of those felled by thc gas were reported in serious condition and two olhcrs were placed in oxygen tents. Two bos- pitals here called in extra person- nel to handle the emergency cases. They said the gas is similar to that used with deadly effect against troops in France in World War I and can cause blindness, heart failure and asphyxiation. Cornwall is a town of some 15.000 population on the St. Law- rence River about 55 miles south- east of Ottawa. Police said an unidentified wom- an and her nine children in th second story of a house sur- rounded by the gas refused pleas to evacuate the dwelling. Firemen who worked their way lo the building wearing gas masks paid thc woman had told them the children were safer in the build- ing which is only about 100 feet from the tank car. The second- threading a needle, and I venture to say he missed the eye." Charred bodies of victims still were strapped to their seats aft- jer fire stripped the airliner of its (shell and left it looking like the carcass of a giant bird. First hint of the disaster came when a control tower operator saw a flash as the plane burst nto flames. But because of thc he was forced to seek help locating the crash scene by GOODFELLOW MAILBAG: Pleas for help this Christmas continue to pour into the office of the Reporter-News faster than story well above the fog which was hanging about seven feet above ground level. Thc woman and her children would have had to run through about 50 yards of (lie heavier- thnn-air gas to reach, safely, lire men said. Doctors sail! most other victims were They satisfactory condition, she concluded. had been vomting anc DEPARTMENT ur WEATHER BURE COM :AU I.MERCE s'llnday. Occasional rain t portion Saturday morn- area Saturday atttt- night. Saturday 56-64. NORTHWEST TEXAS Cloudy occa. sional rain and drizlle Saturday ending Sunday Warmer south portion Sunday HiKh Saturday 46-56. TEMPERATURES 52 Hieti low for 2-t-hours epuuiK 9 56 and 41. Bh and low same date last year; 57 mSet last ninnt: warm today: sunset tonight; Barometer readinfl at 9 p.m.: Humktfty at 3 P.m.: a cent. Never Asked Help Before, but Now... Contributions to the Goodfellow fund reached Friday. Friday. Goal for the fund this 11 inC ItepOrlCl-llCWa Itlalel tllall l-liudj. vjum .....u contributions to t h e Goodfellows year is Contributions may be sent to the Goodfeiiows in care of the Reporter-News. All dona- tions will be published as receiv- d. Friday's contributions were: fund arrive. "I never had to write you be- fore but now I need one lady wrote Friday. "My husband isn't well and hasn't worked for some time. I certainly would ap- preciate it if you can help us with food for Christmas." Another writer said she would like to have some "clothes and toys" for her 12 children, asking pleadingly "I want you to help this year if you can." Apologetically, one lady wrote that her husband is out of work ed. "and I wonder if you can help Mrs. r. 10 with some toys for the four Abilene Independent Auto ids. We had to pay bills and buy Dealers Assn. she wrot With only 20 shopping days rc- coughinR severely when admitted malning before Chris'inas, t h e and had trouble breathing freely. Goodlellow fund James A. Adkison 55.00 W.O.W. Court No. 4243 10.00 Mr. i Mrs. C. L. Sinclair 10.00 Lydia Sunday School Class Southside Baptist Church Willie Mac Martin Mrs. Dennis Manly American Legion Parra- more Post 57 W. A, Daniel Mrs. William E. Perkins W. Glover Abilene Taxi Drivers 6.10 5.00 10.00 17.25 10.00 10.00 10.00 50.00 10.00 A 19-year-old girl wrote for help Mr. Mrs. Ernest Harber 10.00 in providing toys for her sisters Central Texas Iron Works and brothers. "Please help me and my moth- or and father to make Santa Claus come to them t'.iis she wrote. "May the good Lord bless Employes Vernon B. Cox M. It. Hail Anonymous Mr. St Mrs. J. T. Lewis Mrs. Dan Jones Castle Previously Acknowledged TOTAL- 250.00 15.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 2.137.00   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication