Friday, November 30, 1962

Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 30, 1962, Abilene, Texas "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES W E SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 82ND YEAR, NO. 167 PAGE BAIRD Jay Ward is a very funny man who lives in Cali- fornia. He is a producer of the Bullwinkle show and, as a side stunt, the promoter of "state- hood for a myth- ical land he would make the "52d He's the sort who gives peo- ple the lock to the others give the key. He has stickers, buttons and songs about Moosylvania. (Sample, to the obvious tune: "How are things in Moosylvania? Does the fetish swamp still fester there? Does it still give off the pungent smell of Muscatel and sweaty grizzly Jay Ward is a very funny man, a busy showman. He is also a very warm and gentle man. This is about a quiet visit he paid last week to a little Baird girl. Linda Dill is a senior in Baird High School. She fell in love with the Bullwinkle nonsense when it came along, and since she has marked artistic talent, she made some tiny dolls to represent the characters, wrote a script for them and let them "perform" for various Baird classes. One day she bundled up her Bullwinkle dolls and mailed them to Jay Ward. That started a friendship-by- maB. Jay wrote that the dolls were on exhibit in his Hollywood studios. He sent Linda a Bull- winkle clock and a battery-op- erated Bullwinkle figure. Lin- da, in turn, got up a "petition" in Baird seeking statehood for Moosylvania. Then it developed that Jay Ward would be in Dallas for a show in mid-November and he wrote-an invitation to Linda to drop by il she could. Linda would have but six- weeks exams conflicted and she had to write to decline the in- vitation. On Wednesday evening last week a long distance call came to Baird from Jay Ward at Dal- las. He asked to speak to Lin- da. Then he learned. Linda is deaf, her mother told Jay, so the message would have to be relayed. That was the first Jay knew that his young friend is not as others. Spinal meningitis when she was 6 left her with handi- caps. She is deaf, has speech impairment and is confined to a wheelchair. Jay Ward's call to Linda came on a Wednesday evening. Jay Ward himself came on Thursday came in all the glory of his "Bullwinkle Wag- a panel car painted to re- semble a circus wagon, came complete with all sorts of gifts and gadgets from "Bullwinkle." He came to talk with Linda, via her family, and to visit. He set off an assortment of devices to make music for the little girl. "Linda may not hear it, but let's wind it all up for her he said. Jay Ward put on a very spe- cial show for Linda. Then he bent and kissed Lin- da's hand and got in his Bull- winkle Wagon and drove back to Dallas. He left behind a little girl "orbiting a her moth- er says. left behind, too, his offer to send Linda through any col- lege she might choose-an offer her family thinks it cannot ac- cept. "I don't know Jay Ward's Linda's mother says, "but was ten feet tall when he bent and kissed Linda's hand ...I don't know, either, when the Department of Health will get tTtorl don't thtak that band bu been waihed slnea. sometblnf pwttjr wonderful about a person who will take the time to make a little girl happy. there? CATEGORICALLY DENIED BY EDITOR than wqrfmayman, ABILENE, TEXAS. FRIDAY MORNING, I, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS HttlVN BEAT 'EM! This particular cheerleader is Linda White, Winters High School senior, whipping up sup- port for the Winters Blizzards who play Crane High School Friday night at Midland. But she could be considered typical of the "football fevered" students in Winters, O'Brien, Albany, Knox City, Rotan, Mun- day Brownwood, Throckmorton and San Angelo as their teams seek to advance in the schoolboy foot- ball playoffs. Information on these games may be found on Pp. 16, 17, and 18-A. (Staff I I .F ..-Level Session Shows No Progress India, Pakistan Set Border Talks NEW DELHI, India out most of its troops on the Pak- and Pakistan agreed Friday to istani border and shipped them seek an end to their bitter quarrel to Himalayan battle areas. over Kashmir, permitting Indian jver rkOSillllu, ucliiiiiimg uiuiaii Airc agicniiciib nitii i aniauiii military forces to concentrate on for resumption of negotiations in he Himalayan border conflict the near future will help strength- with Red China. en India's hand further for any Red Chinese accused India renewal of fighting with the Chi- of armed provocation by sending nese. It now can relax its guard loop reinforcements to the moun- on the Pakistani border. tain cease-fire line and indicated Communist guns were still at the ready despite a Peking promise to start pulling back Saturday. India's 15-year dispute with Pak- stan had become troublesome for ndian armed forces in the unde- clared border war with the Chi- nese. India kept large numbers of roops on the Pakistani border against the possibility of a renew- al of fighting over Kashmir. Informed sources reported, how- ever, that India already has pulled Kaerwer Blames >er for 'Split' Papi By BILL SHELL Reporter-News Staff Writer Commissioner George Kaerwer Thursday blamed the Reporter- Vews for what he termed the 'split on the (city) commission." His blast at the newspaper came during a discussion at the end of Thursday's city commis- sion meeting in which Commis- sioner Truman Kirk sought a clarification of policy regarding coverage meetings. of commission Kirk had started off the discus leeunls sion quietly, when Kaerwer said, Said Kirk: "It's disturbing to "I think the newspaper is caus- ._ tltt. nnrVl- us and disturbing to the press. They're part of that split too right now." 'Harmonize' Turning to Ed Wishcamper, managing editor of the Reporter- News, who had risen to answer Kaerwer's charge, Kirk said, "We want you to harmonize with us." Harmony, Dignity Urged by Mayor In a tone of deep concern, Abi- lene Mayor C. R. Kinard read city commissioners Thursday aft- ernoon a letter from him to them, calling for more harmonious city jovernment. The letter, reprinted below in its entirety, outlines four points on which he asked commission- ers' "thoughtful analysis." Following reading of the letter, he said, "I hope after you have read this, you can join me in this tern." The next item listed on he commission agenda was a mblic hearing on the annexation if Wylie. However, after his open- ng statement, the .commission rate study. After the meeting, Kinard said only that "the letter speaks for itself.' Text of Kinard's letter is as fol- lows: "Gentlemen: "Because of many events of the past few months, I feel com- pelled to make the following statement addressed to you, the City Commission. "We have been duly elected to conduct the affairs of the City of Abilene, an obligation which means that careful consideration should be given to all our en- deavors to see that they always serve the best interest of our whole community. Subject to hon- ing statement, uie ernment, and 1 asK mai you give discussed a contract for a utilities thoughtful analysis to the follow- _.i. -i..j.. four "I. For the past several years Set MAYOR, Pg. 7-A, Col. t ing the biggest split in the com- mission of anyone in Abilene." At this point Wishcamper rose and said, "The split existed be- fore we commented editorially." He was referring to an editorial in the Nov. 11 issue of the Report- er News criticizing Kaerwer's and Commissioner Wiley Connal- ly's actions on the telephone rate investigation, and then- proposal to repeal the personal tax on au- tos. The editorial also stated the need for more harmony on the commission. (A letter by Mayor C. R. Kinard to the other com- missioners on the subject of har- mony appears on page one of this issue.) "I can show you dozens of peo- ple in town that will say the news- paper is causing the Kaer- wer replied. 'Split' Earlier Wishcamper continued: "There was a split on the commission be- fore you and Kirk came on the commission." He insisted the dis- cussions and actions of the com- mission should be reported to the public. He said actions by commission- ers "have created the friction within" the commission and pub- The agreement with Pakistan The agreement may also result in a diplomatic blow to Peking. The Red Chinese have been feed- ing on anti-American criticism in Pakistan over arms shipments to India and have been making prom- ises of deals in an effort to steer Pakistan out of the Western camp. A 91-word communique aonounc- jig the agreement came after the U.S. assistant secretary of state, W. Averell Harriman, and Dun- can Sandys, Britain's secretary for Commonwealth relations, went through a series of conferences with Indian Prime Minister Nehru and President Mohammed Ayub Khan of Pakistan. While Harriman conferred with Ayub Khan at the Pakistani cap- ital, Rawalpindi, Sandys flew from there to New Delhi for a quick talk with Nehru, then back again. Reliable sources said Sandys did most of the talking in the media- tion effort. The communique issued jointly here and in Rawalpindi said both countries decided to start talks "so as to enable them to live side by side in peace and friendship." In Rawalpindi, Harriman told newsmen: "I am very happy about this agreement and I hope that the present circumstances will make it possible for both sides to come to an agreement satis- factory to each." HIT BY GIRL'S DAD Union Says Dispute Far From Finished The work-resumption agreemenl came after President Kennedy in- voked the Taft Hartley Law Wednesday and set up a special ward to study the months-long contract squabble. not worried need for a harmonious city gov- ernment, and I ask that you give about public reaction to it, but .1. k.. tut teMt thp newsnaner The b.wxd was ordered co re- come and see us. The children to the President by Monday are praying every night that San- ts findings in the bitter battle in- ta will come see them." he added he feels the newspaper could "print stories different." During further discussion, See KAERWER, ft. '-A, Col. 5 volving critical defense work. Both management and the AFL- uuui management ami uie rtTLr from families WnO nave Devil CIO International Association of handed financial setbacks during Machinists avoided direct men- year flow into the Reporter- ion of the dispute's central issue, News every day during the Wylie, Kirby Annexation Action Delayed to Dec. 13 Machinists avoided direct ion of the dispute's central News eve he union shop, when announcing chrjstmas season. That particular one was But they left little doubt of its Thursday. continued importance. Each An expected protest meeting] Thursday on the annexation of Wylie community by Abilene turned out not so stormy, al- though city commissioners heard plenty of protests at the public tearing. About 35 or 40 Wylie residents attended the hearing. An anticipated large turnout of Wylie residents caused the meet- ing to be held in the Public Libra- ry auditorium. Commissioner George Kaerwer might not favor annexing the en- tire area defined hi the original annexation ordinance. The area lies between Catclaw CommlMionen voted to pott, pom find action on the MIWM- ilon ordinance until Dee. 13. CommUsloner Truman Kirk ab- stained from voting on port- ponement alto abstained on similar postponement of final decision en armwition of am north of Like Kirby. There MS NTM indication, U- tfouifa not Kirk and ButtonwiUow Creeks and ex- tends down to and including Wy- lie community. Most of the de- veloped area is along Buffalo Gap Road. Anna Portion? Following the public hearing Kirk asked if it might not be pos- sible to annex a portion of the proposed area, "without taking in M much farm land." The city tax that would be Imposed on farm land was raised as one of the during the public hewing. Kaerwer Indicated he also did not favor annexing the large area of farm land, and referring to the propOMd ButtonwiUow Sewer line to the Wylie area, said "by the time we lot ready to run the sewer line that area could Cloudy tr> partly cloudy thrown aturday with chance (or light rain Satur. "Bin Friday around 65 to 70, low aunt Saturday around 65. TH CENTRAL AND NORTHEAST Cloudy Friday and Saturday. r TEXAS Conriderable lay and Saturday. Scattered uwcra mwiiy northwest and north irtlcns Friday nlfht and Saturday. Cool, north and far wnt Saturday. Blth a plea seeking toys, food and clothing the parents cannot afford to buy. But with less than a month re- maining until Christmas, less than one-fifth of the GoodfeUow's goal of has been realized. 3-2 Split Hires Rate Study CPA ;oai or uecu icauiw uuuues rate suray CUHIKKI Contributions which will purchase Darrei Knight, local CPA, with Christmas items have reached vnnsiuias ueiiia IMIVI. intj pruimiy the mark with in do- Bell Telephone Co., and including nations received Thursday. Klsewhe ;K clear to iTRAL TEXAS: cloudy and eat! wrtipn Friday. :loudy Friday and W- ants IJJl g Splilr VflVJ VVill- J missioners Thursday approved a recommendations which may be utilities rate study contract with reached at that time. TV____t ir_ Gifts should be mailed to the Utilities Co. Goodfellows in care of the Re- porter-News. The Goodfellows store in the old Citizens National Bank build ing at N. 1st and Pine has opened for the 196J Christmas season Laverne Crews, secretary, is on duty from a.m. to p.m Monday through Saturday. New offices hours will be announced Dee. 10. Thursday's contributions: Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Wilde 5.00 Mr. and Mrs. F. E. AUns 15.00 Anonymous IM site hi Cuba. These sources said that, from the U.S. standpoint, the meeting provided no surprises. This could have reflected a measure of dis- appointment. The President has recently described this period as [Kissibly an important turning point in the direction the world is moving. The atmosphere in the unusual- ly lengthy meeting was described as frank and businesslike, lack- ng any air of tension. U.S. of- 'icials retained the belief that some progress had been made on the Cuban problem before Miko- yan arrived at the White House ate in the afternoon. But they said afterward a number of points have yet to be resolved. Kennedy and Mikoyan spent a little time on differences between Washington and Moscow on nu- clear test and disarmament agreements, and dwelt briefly on the situation in Laos. White House informants maintained there was no discussion of Berlin. NEWS INDEX SECTION A Oil news Sports SECTION IS 14-18 Women's newt J Food news Amusements Editorials J Comics Obituaries Farm news, Rodo-TV logs TV Scout On a 3-2 split vote, City Corn- remaining, and any conclusions or primary target Southwestern Lone Star Gas Co. and West Texas Approving the contract were Commissioners Wiley Connally Truman Kirk and George Kaer- wer. Commissioner Cleve Cullers joined in a "no" vote with Mayor C. R. Kinard, who said he felt he must vote against the isnue, al- though he is required to vote only on tie votes. Kate' Net Basically, the contract provides for a study of earnings of the util- ities companies to determine whether they are receiving a fair rate of return. Knight will not be responsible for making Independ Anonymous re Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Douthlt ent plant evaluation in Ma wort. George S. Anderson J5.00 it speciflM an "interim report W. M. Patterson 10.W to the commission wHIun 10 days., Mrs. work performed, werk A schedule of compensation pro- vides for per hour for Knight or partners, with rates from 110 to per hour for other ac- countants and a daily rate or per day for "proof-readers, sec- retaries and clerks." Incidental costs will be reimbursed, and court appearances which may be required will be paid for at per day. Stating that he bad no dislike for Knight. Cullers M off UM p.Vn for election to the mission. CullersexptakMdftatWa oppoaltion wai to which the j0Rfi BM MM ilMViBi KnlgbtsaMbtkeilM CWfc FK. M. CM. I