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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: November 24, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 24, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               Winters 34 Olney 13 Sweetwater City 23 Rising Star 28 Colorado City Angelo 48 Big Spring 54 Breckenridge n flic Abilene "WITHOUT OR 82ND YEAR, NO. 161 SATURDAY J :3 STAR FINAL J OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 9908 X9 MORNING, NOV. 24, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS 33IAM3S W1IJOM3IM Associated Preu (ff) OH, I HOPE HE SEES ME! The expressions of these Abilene small fry seem to say each one hopes Santa Claus will take special notice of him or her as the cheery old man made his way to Abilene Friday. Santa really made the roundsr jumping aboard a motorcade which ended up at the downtown shopping center during the morning, helicoptering to C lark's parking lot early in the afternoon and later by helicopter to Thornton's S. 4th and Oak parking lot, where this picture was taken. See another picture, Pg. 1-B. (Staff photo by Jimmy Parsons) Cubans Want All U. S. Curbs Lifted U.S., Talks Hi Plane Crash Fatal to 17 GOODFELLOWS By LUTHER MOORE ELLICOTT CITY, Md. A United Air Lines Viscount plane; plummeted from a bright, sunny sky Friday and crashed in a woods on a farm near here. All 17 persons aboard were killed. It was United flight No. 297 en route from Newark, N.J., to At- lanta, Ga. Four crewmen and 13 NEWS INDEX SECTION A Spopti 5-8 Obituaries 9 Oil news 11 SECTION B 2 Church news 2 Women's news 3 Editorials 4 Amusements 5 Comics TV Scout 11 Radio-TV logs.......... 11 Farm newt, markets......12 passengers were killed, including 10 persons employed by United. One of the passengers was Spencer Silverthorne, of Beaver Falls, N.Y., president of the Em- pire State Chamber of Commerce who was en route to Atlanta to attend a wedding. The Federal Aviation Agency reported the pilot, Capt. Milton J Balog, 39, gave no hint of im pending trouble before the plan disappeared from a radar scope The Viscount was preparing fo a landing at Washington's Nation al Airport. The FAA said radio communi cations with the craft before ttv crash were "entirely routine' and that the pilot had acknowl edged a routine instruction only three minutes before. A farmer who arrived on the scene immediately after the crash See CRASH, Pg. 10-A, Col. 3 Lots fo read Sunday in Indian Pictographs The Indian pointings which give the town of Point Rock its name arc the most extensive pictogrophs in the South- west. Descriptions of them, and of work being done on -theni by .on Abilene Explorer Post will be given by Kathoryn Duff in the Sunday edition. f Holiday Party Fashions for coeds in Abilcne's colleges ore shown on the cover page of the Women's Section, previewing the festive look for the social season now opening. Football Abilene's two high school wind up the season ttaff coverage of the Munday-Everman playoff. In Southwest Conference S. M. U. plays Baylor, Arkansas takes on Tech and T. C. U. longles with Rice. All these plus the big ones over the nation in Sunday's Sports Section. Latest Spot News, Regular Features! In Near Future By CORNELIUS F. HURLEY HYANNIS PORT, Mass, meeting between President Kennedy and British Prime Min- ster Harold Macmillan was :ermed Friday highly probable for the near future. The precise reason for the parley was not im- mediately specified. Kennedy got a progress report on Cuban matters from his top advisers. He met for more than an hour with the executive committee of the National Security Council and sat down with defense and budget men to go over the big military ipending budget for next year, when it may hit an estimated billion. Andrew T. Hatcher, assistant White House press secretary, said it is highly probable that the President will meet some time soon with Macmillan. Hatcher refused to be pinned down on the date or place or the probable meeting, but it could be in either Washington or Bermuda, where they have met before. It would be the sixth meeting be- tween the two since Kennedy took office. London sources said Macmillan will come to the United States some time after Christmas. Ken- nedy's schedule is pretty well filled up into December, and he has announced he will spend Christmas at Palm Beach, Fla. The President met with Secre- tary of State Dean Rusk, Secre- tary of Defense Edward S. Mc- Namara. Gen. Maxwell B. Tay- lor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and John J. McCloy, head of the U.S. Cuban crisis co- ordinating committee, among others. No Gifts Received No donations were received by Goodfellows Friday and the fund still needs if it is to meet ts goal of to aid the needy this year. Contributions stand at Letters continued to arrive ask-j The conferees flew up from ing for help. The number of and returned there quests is expected to increase shortly after the morning ses- i-ery soon. Checks made out to the Good- fellows Fund should be sent in care of the Reporter-News. Con- tributions will be published as re- ceived. sions, which lasted well into the noon bour. McCloy said the meeting was "a roundup of the Cuban situa- and added, "We're making progress." Fisher County Attorney Dies ROTAN (RNS) H. F. Grind- staff, 78, county attorney for Fish- er County for the past 10 years, died in his sleep at his Rotan home about p.m. Frjday. Mrs. Grindstaff had gone to the post office and, upon returning dome, found him dead. Arrangements are pending at Wcalhersbee Funeral Home here. Born Jan. 28, 1884, in Parker County near Weatherford, he was the son 01" the late Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Grindstaff. He received his law degree rom the University of Texas in 1913 and taught school for 12 years in Dickens County. He at- tended Southwest Texas State Teachers College at San Marcos and received a permanent teach- er's certificate- From 1919 until 1931 he was county attorney of Stonewall County, living in Aspermont. From 1931 until 1937 he was district attorney for the 39th Judicial Dis- trict and lived at Haskell. Mr. Grindstaff moved to Rotan in 1937 to open a law office and operated an extensive real estate business. He originally was county attor- ney here to serve the uncxpired term of the late Leyton A. Webb and was re-elected twice. Mr. Grindstaff was a member of First Baptist Church and had taught a men's Bible class since Jacksonville, Tex., nnd two grand 1919. He was a Mason, an Odd sons. Thanksgiving Day now history, invaded Abilene stores Friday and merchants happily predicted lots of heavy shopping for the next month. The first appearances of Santa Claus added a holiday touch to the goings on. He arrived at Thornton's 4th and Oak, at Clark's and at Showcase Square. Nov. 29 he'll arrive at Scars; Dec. 1 he'll parachute into Westgate Shoppin -n i i Lrficai ousinessmun Capital and Dec. 3 he will head- (he H. F. GRINDSTAFF in 1949 photo Fellow, pas' president of the Ro- tan Lions Club and was an honor- ary member of the Fisher County Sheriff's Posse. Local and area residents knew him as "Judge" Grindstaff. Survivors include his wife of Hotan, the former I.adyc Work- man of Weatherford: twin children, Miss Mary Grlndslaff, extension service specialist at Fort Collins, Colo., nnd Marion Grindstnff of San Jacinto, Calif.; one sister, Mrs. C. S. Baucum of THINK HE'LL LIKE IT? A pair of pretty Anson High School graduates now employed in Dallas do some Christmas shopping in an Abilene store Friday. Sandra Thorn 19 at right, models man's sweater, a possible gift choice, tor Sharon Potts' inspection. Sharon, also 19, is the daughter or Mr. and Mrs. Olin Potts of Route 3, Anson. Sandra's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Roy Thorn, also of Route 3. (Staff Photo) Early Shoppers U. S. Death Swarm to Stores Toll Mounts For Holidays Christmas shoppers, with i later than normal the last week before Christmas. Others are add- ing part-time personnel to serve the huge numbers oi area shoppers. A spot check Friday indicated that a good number of shoppers were from nearby communities. Good Economy Merchants generally believe the economy here is good and that business will continue to be heavy. Local businessmen urge residents line the Abilene Christmas Par- ado. But while the kiddies were agog over St. Nick, their parents and others were getting down to the business of Christmas shopping. They Are Buying "People arc buying, they are not just was the way Montgomery Ward Manager Ray Mussatto expressed it, and other merchants agreed. They also felt local buying power here is "good." A number of Abilene merchants plan to remain open several hours Gene Thornton, executive vice president of Thornton's stores in Abilene, said he thought the local economy was in a favorable posi- tion. He was optimistic about busi- ness. "I'd say we are going to See SHOPPERS, Pg. 10-A, Col. traffic deaths would normally oc cur in a Thursday-to-Sunday span By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Traffic 234 Fires Miscellaneous 36 Total 298 The toll of accidental deaths mounted Friday as the Thanks giving holiday reached its mid point. A rash of multiple-fatality traf fie accidents spurred the highway death total. There were no National Safety Council predictions for the 6 p.m Friday to midnight Sunday per iod. The council said holiday travel isn't as heavy on Thanks Plan Aimed Al Economic Restriction By WILLIAM N. OATTS UNITED NATIONS, NY. (API- Communist sources disclosed Fri- day that Cuba and the Soviet Jnion have asked the United States to lift its long-time econom- c blockade of Cuba as part of an over-all Cuban settlement. This was said to be one of 14 points proposed by Cuba and the Soviet Union to the United States as formal agreement for ending the Cuban Crisis. Soviet First Deputy Foreign Minister Vastly V. Kuznetsov confirmed that such an agreement had been proposed to the United States. U.S. sources indicated that Washington would reject the pro- wsal on lifting the economic ilockade and several other points in the Cuban-Soviet plan. Presi- dent Kennedy said Tuesday that the United States will not "aban- don the political, economic and other efforts of this hemisphere to halt subversion from Cuba." U.N. diplomats reported that Kennedy and the executive com- mittee of the U.S. National Se- curity council studied the Cuban- Soviet proposals at a meeting Friday morning in Hyannjjs Port, Mass. But the diplomats expressed doubt that the United States would reply to it before next week. "Nothing's going to come of it said one diplomat. Another explained that the United States was not willing to discuss any clause taken from Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro's so-called five demands for a Cuban settlement. The Cuban-Soviet proposals disclosed part Thursday among other things, would have the United States agree to: 1. lift its econom- ic blockade of Cuba; 2. stop "in- terference in the domestic affairs of and, 3. start negotiating See CUBA, Pg. 10-A. Col. 3 giving as on other major holi days, although it said about 480 DEATH TOLL ROUNDUP WEATHER Oil Truck, Train Crash Takes 3 Lives in Texas (Weather Man, ,T-A ABILENE AND VICINITY (Radius 10 miles) Partly cloudy ami nol much change In temperature both Snlurciav and Sunday. Illch both days near 70. Low Saturday nlsnt about 50. NORTH TEXAS Consider- able, cloudiness and no Important tern, pcrature changes Saturday ,ind Sunday. Ocaiilonal light rain or Saturday mostly south portion. High Saturday 64- 'NORTIIWEST TEXAS Considerable cloudiness Saturday and Sunday. Chance of light rain late Saturday or night. High Saturday 57 north to 71 "SOUTHWEST TEXAS Considerable cloudiness Saturday and Sunday. Occa- sional light rain or drizzle, mostly cast portion. HlHli Saturday 66 north to 76 aouth. TKMFERATURE8 Frl. a.m. Fri. p. 52 fi9 13............ 72 S 8 v.fi nnd Inw Tor 24 omllni 9 uime Init year: night; JiimrUe today; "KirJiKi w; '.ft HumMllr al I P.m.: H nr By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The flaming eras h of an oil truck and train near Tyler took three lives Friday and pushed violent death toll for the long Thanksgiving holiday in Texas to 34. The count was only half over. It started Wednesday at 6 p.m. and ends Sunday midnight. Texas had the dubious distinc- tion of leading the nation with 26 gory traffic deaths, 13 of them in three crashes. Three trainmen died Chandler, 10 miles west of Tyler, when their Cotton Belt freight hit the rear of a truck, freshly loaded with crude oil. Fire started at once and sprayed n wide area, burning for more than an hour. The victims, all from Tyler, were .1 T. Piles, 53, K. P. Jones, iff, nnd II. E. Malonc. Trucker James Luce of Swan was burned'driving. seriously. A light plane crashed in the rugged Hill Country of Gillespie d the County near Fredericksburg Fri day night, killing two Austin men They were identified as J.H. Lam bert and Robert A. Ferrell, pilot of the plane. Other recent casualties: Separate shooting accidents in Texarkana Thursday killed two youngsters. Kenneth Bell, 16, was fatally shot while playing with a pistol. Kathy Geraldine Firth, 12, died of a gunshot wound in the chest in a mishap in the yard her home. Frederick Baudoux, 32, of War- ren, Mich., was killed before dawn Friday when his car hit a bridge and foot-wide mclal rail pierced the auto lengthwise, 10 miles cast of Terrell on U. S. Baudoux apparently doicd while inside died Fred Garland, 55-year-old Val- ient, Okla., Negro, was killed lay afternoon in the Denver and Rio Grande Railway yards at Wichita Falls when 25 cars of a freight train ran over him. He had said he was going to hop a freight to Fort Worth. Michelle seven-week-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Shirley Ray Killion of Odessa, was killed a car-truck crash a mito weft of Fort Stockton Friday. UN mother, 19, was seriously inured. father, 26, was treated and released. Sam Zepeda, 19, of Boltaf, dM Friday of Injuries received Wednesday night in an automobile acidcnt which already had d the life of itjrtsroU Caleitn larcia. Their car misMd a cum overturned two mite Mat ei of The 10 od Whartw.   

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