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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 2, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 2, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               -WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOB WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT MOKNI.Nv.l 82ND YEAl, NO. 107 ______ ot ABILENE. TEXAS. TUESDAY MORNING. OCTOBER 2. fe9 SW TWO SECTIONS PAGE ONE School was getting underway new Jackson Elementary when very earnest young man ante Up to First Grade Teacher Juantta ReM and laid bis adwIasUc cards on the table. "I'm supposed to be in school, be said. "I'm six yean old. ..I ban my birth certificate. "But I just want you to know this. I dent know bow to lead or to write." TneC. L. Uddek rf Winter! have a young executive for a grandson, Their older grandson, Lanny McNeely of Altos, Okla., en- tered the first grade in school this year. His parents. Capt and Mrs. E. S. McNeely, felt it would be a good idea for Little Brother Doug to attend kindergarten. To keep Doug from feeling left out his dad offered to buy him book satchel like Lanny's. Doug wouldn't have it-he want- ed a briefcase. When A. R. (Red) Earn ST., retired Abilene trucking compa- ny owner, got reservations for a -show on Las Vegas' famous last week he didn't know the name of the particular night club. While waiting for the show to start he noticed a package of matches with the club's name. "New Frontier." Staunch Republican Elam was bent on leaving. He would go next door to a club he learn- ed was named "Last Frontier." He was persuaded to stay by the assurances that the club was already in existence when Pres- ident Kennedy's Frontier open- ed. Newly-anived Pamela Ann- ette McUmore, born Sept. at Memorial Hospital, is not about hr classed as "neglected." She has her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jerald McLemore, 618 For- rest She has her paternal grand- Mr. and Mrs. Arnold McLemore, Moran. She has her maternal grand- parents, Mr. and Mrs. Doyle Squires, Olden. She has three paternal great- grandparents, Mrs. R. V. Young of Stamford and Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Williams of Stamford. She has three maternal great- grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Squires of Rochelle and Gus- tav Brandt of Cisco. As might be expected, all 10 grandparents have been to call for she is the first great-grand- child on either side of the house. Weatherman and Mrs. C. E. Sitchler traveled recently through the South and to Ten- Tennessee was having a drouth. Along with Sitchler R got a four-inch rain. He hadn't forecast it. He was on vacation. Sabin was tasty, even If the flavor was overly sweet and lin- gered overly long because of the waterless minutes doctors de- creed. The Sabin Sunday was a fine demonstration by doctors of their interest in the public's well-being. The people were generous, giving freely with no more prompting than a sign so that contribution covered the cost of Uw polio vaccine. In fact, the only bad taste wit of the whole marvelous undertaking was this: Some 34 per cent of our people, medi- cal leaden estimate, failed to sip the preventive syrup. Some M per cent, unless they get make-up dotes of the vaccine. are SUB eligible for polio. RIOT DEBRIS Marshals line the sidewalk on the Ole Miss campus Monday following student riots protesting enrollment of a Negro at the institution. The street is lined with tear gas cannisters, bricks, bottles and other debris hurled during the riot (AP Wirephoto) Eastland Plans Ole Miss Probe WASHINGTON (AP) Sen. James 0. Eastland, D-Miss., di- rected the Senate Judiciary Com- mittee on Monday to make e complete investigation "of all events at the University of Mis-__________ _ sissippi since U.S. marshals and wnite segregationists before they Army troops moved in. Eastland and other Mississippi members of Congress charged that Justice Department person- other state officials had failed to nel and U.S. marshals WS SBt'U live up to a promise made earlier the mob violence Sunday night at Sunday to maintain peace on the the University of Mississippi. Troop Round Up Rioters at Oxford started anti-riot action. The Justice Department said also that Gov. Ross Barnett and A terse statement from East- said state troopers were witfc land's office gave the first official notice of the investigation al- though the Mississippi .senator said earlier in the day that his committee had been invited to probe the actions of the marshals. There also were calls for inves- tigations by Mississippi House members. The Mississippians charged that U.S. marshals set off the riots by 'firing directly into a group of students." Two persons were killed dozen injured in violence which erupted Sunday night as the cli- max of a struggle over the efforts of James H. Meredith to become the first known Negro to attend House Changes Flood Proposals Including Abilene WASHINGTON (AP) The House Public Works Committee in drawn prior to the outbreak. The Mississippi senators said their information came from an unnamed "responsible source" on he campus. One senator from the Deep South suggested an investigation by the Senate Judiciary Commit- tee headed by Sen. James 0. Eastland, a Democrat from Mis- sissippi. Rep. John BeH Williams, D-Miss., called for a special five- member committee, appointed by the speaker of the House, to in- vestigate "the role and conduct of the U.S. Department of Justice in connection with the death of two persons and the injury of others at the University of Mississippi." Rep. John Bell Williams, D- approving Monday a water proj- ects authorization bill made three changes in appropriations for Tex. as projects. The items, all involving flood control, include: Vince and Little Vince Bayous, San Gabriel River, and Clear Fork of the Brazos River at Abilene, The Abilene project, although before Congress as part of the water projects bill, never has required to provide some 000 toward the cost. The city requested that the proj- ect be studied but no final deci- sion has been made on city parti- cipation. Texas officials have approved the proposed plan for Abilene, clearing the way for it to be in- cluded House. in the bfll before the Rigid Controls Go Into Effect OXFORD, Miss. (AP) Hoards of combat ready troops clamped rigid control on this seething Southern town Monday night after James H. Meredith, a 'Negro, ended segregation at the University of Mississippi Bent on smothering continued riots that took two lives Sunday night and led to the arrest of former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, helmeted troops patroled with loaded rifles and fixed bayonets. The army named Lt. Gen. Hamilton to f nf m army Hamilton Howze of Ft. Bragg, head the massive build- up of nearly Army troops. t Observers said appointment of the "3-star general may mean there will be more soldiers in the state were ever assembled in peacetime. Military police and infantrymen patroled Oxford. They imposed tight security measures on the Ole Miss campus. burg, attorney for the National Association for the Advancement f Colored People, told the New Means States-Item that a second girl-is in the process of pplying for entrance into the Uni- ersity of Mississippi. Meredith, 29, a veteran of the Korean War, registered in a 55- Soldiers permitted no outsiders minute routine session with Reg. on the grounds. They searched jstrar Robert EUta, fafledto find everyone enterin- the gates. They his first class and drove off with the all-white university. The Misiissippians' account was 10 direct contrast to a statement by the Justice Department, which charged that the marshals had been harassed for by WALKEB RECONSIDERS -Former Gen. Edwin Walker con- KJUswH 01 TW1IU1.1 bristUng bayonets which Stopped him M be caught IT- unlbai) awav Shnrtlv after hooded garment to his waist and kept the numbers of milling stu- an escort. dents under them. Infantrymen ringed the tmi- Scattered'arrests persisted into versity campus, where the night. Soldiers broke out tear night's gas fumes blanketed the gas to quash one demonstration of central area. about 30 brick-throwing students near a fraternity house. Troops _ _s., Monday? He turned and walked away. Shortly ttSs'tocident, Walker's arrest was announced. (AP Wirephoto) carrying a home-made gas mask. Federal forces arrested at least Uprisings hi Town Renewed uprisings broke out to the tense town of Oxford, where tension mounted as residents and thers watched more than campus. A department spokesman To U. S. Medical Center SPRINGFIELD, Mo. Former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, charged with insurrection against the United States, was taken Monday to the-U.S. Medical Center for federal prisoners in Springfield. The controversial Texan ted a charge of students against U.S. marshals at the University of Mississippi Sunday night. Walker was arrested at a road- block in Oxford, Miss., at noon Monday. He waived preliminary Miss., made the charge that mar- hearing when arraigned before shals had fired into a group of students and be gave a "respon siWe official" on the campus as a U.S. Commissioner Omar Craig, who set Walker's bond at He was taken to Springfield after source. The two Mississippi sen- failing to post bond. ators, making similar charges, did not reveal their sources but said the information bad corroborated. been Other congressional reaction to Federal judges rangai sharp recriminations to praise: 1. Eastland said: "I think the blood is on the hands of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals." The court ordered Meredith's enroll- ment at the university. 2. Sen. Wayne Morse, D-Ore., said that President Kennedy rose to "the superlative heights of in his address to the nation Sunday night. 3. Sen. John Stennfa, D-Miss., Meredith from the Ole cam- pus. He said this would restore law and order. 4. Sen. Stephen M. Young, D- Ohio, and Morse criticized former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker for referred to Walker as psycho- path and Morse added, "Maybe rated later in the day. 39 persons Monday of s om them TWfflWtaXen ar custody campus roadblocks. The total brought the arrest number to US psychiatric study to determine whether they are sane enough to stand trial. The medical center Is main- tained by the Federal Bureau of authority of the U.S. Prisons to treat prisoners with either physical or mental often send cused persons to the center for Walker profile, Pg. alone could bring a maximum ine of and a prison sen- ence of 20 years. Walker, as a major general, commanded federal troops sent into Little Rock, Ark., in 1957 to Dr Russell Settle, warden of enforce court ordered publfc the center, the staff would do with Walker. When officers took Walker into custody on the outskirts of Ox- ford, he told them. "I guess I'm in custody." Charges against Walker were: 1. Assaulting, resisting, or im- peding U.S. marshals. 2. Conspiring to prevent dis- charge of duties. 3. Inciting, assisting and en- gaging in insurrection against the 4. Conspiring to oppose by force the execution of any law of the from the Army after a controver sy over a troop indoctrination pro- gram in Europe. Walker walked into the court- room with a slight smile flicker- ng across his face. Craig advised Walker he could waive the pre- liminary hearing or be represent- ed by counsel. "My counsel is not in this Walker said. Craig told him he could get competent at- torneys in Mississippi. Walker asked for and received permis- sion to leave the court momentar- ills. ac-U.6. 6 Jurors Picked For Lopez Trial assured that it (his trial) comes jack to Craig told him the trial would be held in U. S. District Court in Mississippi. "I waive this Walker said. Urging a firm stand by Mis- sissippi in the face of federal pressures leading up to the en- Department spokesman, said all WAXAHACfflE (RNS) Six of Delfrfo Cavaws, who was charged roUment of James H. Meredith, but about 25 of those in custody the 12 jurors necessary for the oapv _______ of AbHene wK Mvodd te Justice Department" to remove Hondo, charged with the hammer ness and that the trial becon- to mva. of thousands" of them and charges were being Of ADUene, WniCIl WOUIO OB _____ J M P IU nf timuri In allow tbne to Obtain vnlnnliwr. for th. final fc. ..M slaying of M. E. Boggess, 75, of tinued to allow time to obtain volunteers for the final showdown. Ballinger, had been selected when court recessed here at 6 p.m. Monday. Earner, District Judge A. R. Stout had overruled three defense leading a group of rioters. Young motions presented by Warwick ginning at p.m. Jenkins, court-appointed attorney. he's a sick man." Walker wae be quashed because it in- Jenkins had asked that the jury within less than two but a duded no Latin Americans, that Stewardess Tells of Flying Ship WASHINGTON f air- said. "I concluded that when she line flight engineer said Monday get off the pilot's lap her high be stewardess dip into the heel cut the mixture twitch on pilot's lap dflrtng a flight and be- during this frolfc she eaugM her off aa toe of the engines." i heel to a threttts Wd after westf Ml the glri stt ttiot'i kip ea a WNttn Air Two tamer stewardesses also operattens of Ow Federal Avla- Govmmat Opera- tin ttaM nibcomni'ltee fety bad beta tartted hy pii.i to at the on a lark. OM Htm, Margaret Mry "I thtak I did a fairly good Job, I had never done It be- Miss Dooefry told the sub- committee, which is Investigating Another ex Marie MM aw a AM officer plane drunk after an aB rifM driaktag boot, amd had take i On a charter (light to the Far Eart to pick up Indonesian Presi- dent Sukarno for a visit to Wash tagton. she said the Trsw World Airways pilot landed at Hong Koa  Mn. Jake TaBey, night Many have since been turned loose. Quiet ea Canwu For the most part, quiet settled over Oxford as night fell. The darkness ended a day marred by a downtown riot quelled by rifle fire into the air and tear gas. At the capital in Jackson, Gov He returned, still smiling, and troops stream into are town of Shouting demonstrators, num- bering ta the hundreds, hurled nduded a large percentage of iegroes. Military police fired over the rowd and burled at least two ear gas grenades to disperse hem. Troops occupied the court- house square and cleared the area of civilians. Then, a ring of bay wic iu UWMMWU, _ j Ross Bamett, who once vowed to onet-carrying soldiers blocked aH go to jail rather than see Ole Miss routes into the square. Many tores put up a "closed" sign. A mile away, marshals had i integrated, blamed the disorder on the marshals. He said they were "inexperienced, nervous and trigger happy." Earlier, Barnett, under an 11 a.m. (CST) Tuesday deadline to purge himself of contempt o court charges, called for an end to violence. Law and order must prevail, he said in a broadcast "even though our state has been invaded by federal forces." All day caravans of mil tary vehicles roared into Oxford They carried crack units of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions Fresh troops of the 1st Airborne Battle Group of the 328th Infantry landed at Columbus from Ft Campbell, Ky., to augment the Mississippi contingent. Equipped With Bayonets Wearing battle fatigues and equipped with bayonets and gas masks, the soldiers sealed off the campus and courthouse square Jeeps patrolled the streets. Federal forces arrested 176 per- sons Sunday night and during the day Monday, about one-third stu dents. Edwin Guthman, a Justic a Negro, at Ole Miss Monday, were released, has the best But in the end, his role in the prepared, he said. Judge A. R. Stout overruled the resistance on the campus Sunday final motion at and adjourn, night was to lead several hundred ed for 15 minutes, with the quet- students storming a line of federal Honing of the jury panel be-marshals guarding the adminis- tration building. Guthman said they were being kept in confinement, but declined to say where. Oxford has no jail Charges will deal with con spiracy to obstruct justice and to interfere by force with the per WEATHER The evidence formance of a court, Guthman said Some of those picked op lived caliber as far as 800 miles away. In addition to the two Hued in shots. the night-tong campus rioting, SO persons were hurt. The Justic Department reported no one had been killed or hurt from gunfire from the weapons of federal troops. Meredith's enrollment dismay at Ob Many dents were seen leaving with packed suitcases, A reliant source tat the student booatag of flee said more thaa haU stu- hi the dormMriM had checked etrt. a New OrkNSM, Jack Green- Kennedy, riot stories, Pg. tVA corted Meredith into Lyceum Hall at a.m. A Confederate flag flew at half mast outside. Meredith seemed outwardly calm, paid his cash for tui- tion, and asked about class roo> tine. He was given a two-room apartment with kitchenette in residence hall. Efcort by Marshals A Justice Department man said marshals will live with him and escort him to class "at ong as be is in any danger." As Meredith left the office, smiling, he said he was at Ole Miss for purely academic rea- sons, would attend classes only and would not participate in ex- tra-curricular activities. He was asked if he was happy that the long struggle had met with success. he replied, occasion." "This is not Hundreds of jeering Followed him to his first class- colonial American times. 'You've got blood on your governmen they cried. Soldiers ink against ffle ringleaders into custody. "The scars of the night rebeffioB lay scattered through the shaded campus. There were six completely burned cars. Twegtjr others were damaged or had their windows smashed. door of the Lyceum which the marshals had during the riot, there rifle bullet the scars ol NEWS INDEX StCTION A OMtMrfM Oil HCTNN V news GianU Win,   

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