Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 10, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 10, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               Mm "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES W E SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 82ND YEAR. NO. 86 ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMB E96T OT svxsi SVTIVO 3AV 3100 ___ 990Q xe 03 saivs PAGES IN ONE SECTION Auocbltd Prtm (ff) H. J. Zappe is president of the board of the Ballinger Co- operative Gin and Elevator. Mr. Zappe doesn't smoke hasn't since he quit some 30 years ago. Tom Moreland is vice presi- dent of the co-op board. He doesn't smoke, either. I. W. Conway, board secre- tary, doesn't smoke, nor do Hen- ry Fowler, Newman Smith, C. L. Howcll or C. C. Campbell, the other directors. Jack Fry, the co-op manager, doesn't use cigaret, pipe or ci- gar. Neither do Mrs. G. D. Pul- lin and Mrs. Katie Preim, who work in the office. In fact, the co-op's new of- fice is hard up for ashtrays. The new directors' room doesn't have any. Zappe has been on the board 18 years and he says as far as he can recall not a board mem- ber during those years has smoked. Under close questioning, Zap- pe admitted, with a guffaw, the board has on occasion ad- journed a meeting so some of its officialdom can go over to Lowake for lunch. Larry Hornbaker, of the Fi- delity advertising firm which has been handling the events associated with the opening of the big Westgate shopping area, answered the phone the other day and a voice, obviously a friend ribbing him, said, "Thees ees the Ceeesco Keed." "Oh, eees Larry mim- icked. It was. t J. D. Willett Jr., Albany busi- nessman who also is his town's official weathecuobserver, says the deluges last week reminded him of an Oklahoma rain a Tul- sa fellow told him about. "Had a five-gallon can and it rained and it rained until the can was full. And then 1 discov- ered the can didn't have a bot- tom in it." Abilene public school admin- istrators were having a staff meeting the other day, discuss- ing various problems and proj- ects, when there arose a matter of concern to several. What, they asked each other, about the students who come to school too early? What to do with those who come to school at 7 and a.m.? "Guess it's a healthy Supt. A. E. Wells commented. "They love school so much they come an hour or so early." To which there was a reply from Bob Nail, principal of Mann Junior High, a school whose building was worked over a few nights ago by vandals. "Guess those who don't love school come late at night." Fashion notes: A woman should never, a local style ex- pert advises, go into a store and ask for "slacks" for herself. She dates herself when she asks for for women never wear "slacks" nowadays. Every- body wears capri pants, tapers, pedal-pushers maybe, Bermu- das, or shorts. Even those who shouldn't do. Brownwood's First Presby- terians, it is said, sanction cas- ual dress for nursery-sized Pres- byterians in the summertime. A young visitor was brought to the nursery one hot recent Sunday and the visitor's mother exclaimed, looking around, "Oh, you can wear shorts to the church A very young Brownwood Presbyterian miss pulled her- self up to every inch of her height. "Us she said primly, "can do anything ex- cept sin." Fair Will Open 6-Day Run Today By JERRY FLEMMONS Reporter-News Staff Writer The West Texas Fair be- jinx strutting Monday, all decked ut in her best 1962 dress. The dress is showy, more than little colorful and loud, trimmed with frills, full of exhibits, shows, and midway thrills, and absolutely tulging at the seams. Visitors are expected to begin treaming into the fair grounds at 0 a.m. Monday, when the fair of- icially opens. By closing time Sat- irday at 11 p.m., it is predicted NEWS INDEX SICTION A Reeta-TV tots Cento I 10, 11 W 11 FAIR NOTES Harmony on the fairgrounds flourished Sunday as workers put finishing touches to the 1962 West Texas Fair. Some workers, however, took time out for a little musical harmonizing at the food booth sponsored by the Abilene chapter of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Bar- bershop Quartet Singing in America. Left to right are Bill Markum, N. u Mitchell, Bob Test and Jack Glover. (Staff Photo) Man Killed In Accident Near Gail SNYDER (RNS) A midway show crewman is dear! and two others are in serious condition as the result of an automobile acci- dent about 6 a.m. Sunday, two miles east of Gail on U. S. High- way 80. Sidney Raymond Oliver, 59, of Pueblo, Colo., died at p.m. Sunday of head injuries suffered when he was thrown from the au tomobile as it overturned after a car it was towing weaved, throw- H. area last week, died Saturday but a cold front and cloudiness Sunday chased away any hopes for a mild- weather opening. The army of workers, who dressed the 1962 fair Sunday, shiv- ered in 60 degree temperature. Monday's prediction calls for tem- peratures in the low 70's. Behind the scenes Sunday, coats were at a premium as the workers made last-minute preparations. On the midway, Bill Hames had hat more than persons his coat buttoned to the have crowded exhibit halls, ivestock barns and the midway. Monday's crowds will be swell- ed by the invasion of school chil- ren from 14 area cities and towns, ncluding those of all Abilene pub- ic schools. Superintendent A. E. Wells said all Abilene schools will lose at p.m. Monday so chil- dren can attend the fair. More than 100 other area chools and colleges will be rep esentcd during the six days of activities. This year's fair will bring, for he whole family, some of the tale's best livestock, top exhibits, ree nightly variety shows, and as usual, weather. Another picture, story on Pg. S-A and other prizes waited to be dis- ributed to the various booths. played the West Texas lames said. "I hope we will be highway, throwing the first car here for 38 more." Sheep, goats, and hogs in Swine Barn were being sheared and groomed for judging, which begins at 8 a.m. Monday. Many wore hoods to protect them from the cold and to keep their well- neck as he directed erection of his carnival, the Bill Hames Shows. dirty. Cots, metal half-beds, and sleep-Cogdell "Memorial Hospital by mal pens. Many handlers and derwent surgery to repair a com- Strange Finds At San Angelo SAN ANGELO (API-City offi- cials made two surprising finds Sunday morning when they com- pleted draining Bell Street Lake, part of the city's water supply. They found 50 pounds of TNT behind the city's main water works plant and a small foreign- make car which apparently had Heavy rains, which drenched the been in the lake for some time. owners will spend some nights next to their prized animals. Two enormous Army trucks, Fair Timetable laden with the Nike Zeus and Nike and a back injury. Smith Hercules missiles stood near the treated and released, entrance. Soldiers were polishing the huge projectiles. Food standj were doing a big jusiness in coffee and hot choco- late, so much so one stand worker said, "We may have to return the cold drinks if this cold weather seeps up." Up at the Harmony Stand, spon sored by the Abilene chapter of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America, All-Day Features Throughout Fair Week Mercury Capsule Exhibit. Exhibit Building Nike Zeus and Nike Hercules Missiles, Midway Texas Game and Fisb Commission Wildlife Exhibit, Display Building Army CBR Exhibit, Exhibit Building "The Efficient Department of Agriculture Exhibit, Foul- try and Rabbit Building Egg Department of Agriculture Exhibit, Poul- try and Rabbit Building Aerospace Medical Display. Display Building WesUnghouse Atomic Display, Display Bulldtog MONDAY Taylor County Day and Horticulture n.m.-Judging-Open Sheep Classes (Mutton Breeds) Jndgng-Jiuior Sheep Classes (Mutton Breeds) TEXAS FAIR OFFICIALLY OPENS Booths ta Agrlcultnre Jndglng-rTA Md 4-H Club Exhibit, Judging-Quarter Horse Performance Classes Midway Show-Outdoor Theater featuring Jimmy Dean, The Hannonfcals. Md Mark WlhoB and his "Magic Lend of AllaKaum" Hone Mare Halter Midway Show Outdoor featuring Jimmy Dean, The Humonlcats. and Mark WUtoi md his "Magic Lud W AllaKasam" cm-Bill Humes Canlnl Iree act "The Flying Valen- tines" Special free dny for Abilene and Taylor Ceotjr schools, with by special Uchet Iron U a.m. to U p.m. Schools In- ended we: Jtas) Ned, Trent. Merhel, Tye, Bnffile Gnp. Wylle, ElnMMe. Jeseph's Academy, ACC Cam- us Osek. .Kewpie dolls, stuffed ng for the merry-go-round. "This is the 38th year we have barbed wire. :roomed coats from becoming oed the DPS officers. ng bags were lined beside the ani- Test, and Jack Glover were keep- ing warm with a few old songs. The Women's Building was al- most deserted, except for Donald, 9, and Rusty, 11, Collins, sons ol Mr. and Mrs. John M, Collins, 1402 Westwood. Rusty had a handful of cotton candy and both were puzzling over a modern painting. the sound of hammering as ex- hibitors booths. put final touches to All in all, Sunday was a busy day. After 74 years, the West Tex- as Fair has put on a little weight, Red China Says U2 Shot Down Jig it out of control. In "serious but not critical" condition at Cogdell Memorial Hospital, were Clifford Ratliff Jr., 30, of Hinton, West Va., who was also thrown out of the car, and Maurice Leviton, 70, of Greens- boro, N. C. The three men were passengers n the automobile driven by George Smith, 31, of Inglewood, Dolo. Smith told investigating of- 'jcers that they were enroute to Abilene where the midway will operate during the West Texas Fair. Smith told Highway Patrolmen animals Royce Stowe and Wendell Rehm that they had pushed the other car from just outside of Lamesa Chilling Weather Follows Storms Wooden horses stood around wait- to GaBswhere they tied it to the 1952 Ford they were driving with The second car skidded on the into the ditch. It turned over at Smith said. Oliver and Ratliff were thrown from the car. One of several passengers in :he rear car caught a ride back to Gail and contacted the sheriff's department, which in turn radi- Bell ambulance where Leviton un pound fracture of his arm Sunday lave suffered deep lacerations Gel Oral Vaccine SNYDER (RNS) A total of Scurry County residents re- Bill Markum, N. H. Mitchell, Bob vaccine at four locations in Sny- der Sunday. The mass immunization was termed a success by the Snyder Jaycees, sponsoring it. Some 40 medical personnel from CogdeK Memorial Hospital and 120 volun- teers assisted in the registration and administration of the vaccine The immunization stations, lo- The General Exhibitis Hall and cated in four schools, were open Display Building were noisy with from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Donations of 25 cents were asked from per- sons receiving the vaccine bul those unable to pay were provided the vaccine without charge. Jaycees had vaccinations available and had predicted that her dress is tight-fitting, but all persons would receive the the bulges are in the right places, vaccine. Chinese Claim U.S. Involved By SPENCER MOOSA halin Island, north of Japan, for TAIPEI, Formosa (AP) Red nine minutes on the preceding U2 INCIDENT Map locates eastern China (A) where Peip- ing radio says a Nationalist Chinese U2 type plane was shot down Sunday. Nationalist China headquarters on Formosa (B) China claimed it shot down a Na- tionalist Chinese U2 plane over East China and charged Monday that the flight by the American- made plane was part of a U.S. spy program directed from Japan. The Nationalists acknowledged that one of their U2s was miss- ing over the Chinese mainland on 'routine" reconnaissance mis- Sunday. The Nationalists also disclosed that they had bought two of the high-altitude planes in the United States and had been operating them for near- ly two years. It was the second time in a admitted loss of a U2 plane on week that a Communist nation had a reconnaissance mission over Red China. Sakhalin Island (C) was scene of last week's Soviet day, the Soviet Union protested protest over a U2 overflight. (AP Wirephoto Map) charged U2 incursions of its ter- ritory in the Far East. Last Tues- that an American-piloted UJ vio- lated Soviet air space over Sak- By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A shivering cold front, moving into Texas on the heels of more scattered showers and thunder- storms, sent temperatures dipping to new season lows Sunday. The front which cut a southeast- ward path into the state dropped the mercury to a low of 40 de- grees at Dalhart during the pre- dawn hours. New rains fell in North Texas der water in spots in the Wichita Falls area but remained open to traffic. Water covered parts of the Wichita Falls Country Club's Golf Course three to four feet in depth and some persons went swimming in the deeper pools. Lightning knocked Radio Station KBWD in Brownwood off the air three times as thunderstorms dumped .85 of an inch of rain on The injured men were taken to where streams and lakes were the Central West Texas City. swollen from Friday night's down- pours that sent flood waters surg- ing on damaging trails. Temperature readings behind afternoon. Ratliff was reported to the front were generally in the 70s and high 60s Sunday. Amaril- io had an afternoon high of 62 degrees and Lubbock 65. However, Dalhart had a high of only 60. Untouched by the cold front, Laredo near the Mexican border tiad the highest afternoon reading in the state, 102 degrees. By late afternoon the cold front stretched from Sherman, south- eastward through Dallas, Fort Worth, StephenviUe and San An gelo. In addition to the 3.42 inches of rain at Beeville, rainfall up to noon included College Station .16 of an inch, Wink .05, Victoria 1.10, Amarillo .01, Austin .06, Corpus Christi .31 and Amarillo a trace. Forecasts called for much cooler weather and gradually clearing Sunday's heaviest rain was 3.42 Monday. Some thundershowers inches during the morning at Bee- ville in South Texas. Victoria had 2.18 and Corpus Christi 1.66. Between 15 and 20 families fled will continue along the coast anc in extreme East Texas. Tempera- lures early Monday morning are expected to range from the mid- their homes in the south part of die 30s in the Panhandle to the Wichita Falls as Holiday Creek, ceived their first Sabin (oral) polio swollen from weekend rains, over- flowed its banks. Several streets, U. S. Highway 281 and Farm Road 369, were un- Winner of Beauty Contest Guarded CALI, Colombia (AP) Ten troopers with fixed bayonets had to escort the bride through a crowd of at Cali Cathedral when Jorge Araneta of Manila and Estella Marquez of Cali, win- ner of the I960 Miss International beauty queen title at Long Beach, Calif., were married Saturday night. Excited women in the crowd tried to grab bits of Miss Mar- quez' wedding FBI Agent Investigating Two Negro Church Fires Attacked By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS An FBI agent was attacked Sun- ett at the scene of a church fire in Sasscr. Mohr and a fellow of- u by a white man as federal ficer, Joe O'Rourke, subdued officers investigated the burning Puckett and took him to jail at of two Negro churches in racially Albany. disturbed southwest Georgia. their Negro voter registration and suddenly struck Mohr the identified M Virgil Edmund Puck- era! officer. A Negro leader, James Forman of Atlanta, wired Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy, "The unwar- Puckett, who went to the spot ranted attacX upon an agent of said the cause of the fire has not the FBI is only indicative of the The incident occurred as civil where the agents were working, The assailant, believed to nearby Dawson, was I on a charge of assaulting a fed- lawlessness rampant in southwest badly damaged. be Albany, and Mount Mary Baptist held Church, about four miki from the other church. 60s and 70s along the coast. Sunday. The United States admit- ted that a patrol plane blown off course by high winds might have accidentally violated Soviet air space. A Peiping broadcast in English late Sunday night disclosed the latest ,U2 incident. It said: "A U.S.-made U2 high altitude reconnaissance plane of the Chi- ang Kai-shek gang was shot down this morning by an air force unit of the Chinese People's Liberation Army when it intruded over East China." The broadcast left unanswered such questions as the fate of the pilot, the altitude of the plane, its Bxact location and how it was brought down. There was specula- tion in Washington, however, that the Communist Chinese have ground-to-air missiles in opera- tion. The Chinese Communists gave no additional details about how the plane was downed when they fired their first propaganda guns about the incident. The Peiping Peoples Daily, of- ficial newspaper of the Chinese Communist party, declared that the Nationalists' U2 was engaged "not in an isolated flight but in See PLANE, Pfc 4-A Col. 7 Man Drowns Near Miles BALLINGER (RNS) Edgar Wehlmann, 43, of Mereta drowned in the Concho River about two miles above the Mullin Crossing near Miles Sunday afternoon. Pat Adair, field director of On San Angelo Emergency Corps, said that Wehlmann was wading in the river and stepped off into the deep water. The body was recovered with grappling hooks about 7 p.m. Sun- day by the 25-man search party from San Angelo, Adair said. Adair said that they received the call about 4 p.m. and the search for the body took about two hours. The body was found is the deep water near the middle of the river, Adair said. Wehlmann's body was taken to the Johnson Funeral Home in San Angelo where funeral arrange- ments are pending. One Seriously Hurt During Space Test (Wcalber ABILENE AND VICINITY (Radius 40 Cloudy Monday raornlnf, bf> coming fair Monday afternoon and Tues- day with Utite higher ttrnpenturut Tuesday. High Monday in the low TO'l. been determined. The cabin was The cabin simulator is a large Fletcher and Smith entered for a was to end Monday. This was the 14th such experi- ment at the school sad the lint in which trouble occurred, a "But this is what we do them for, to iron out the troubles on the ground. It would have been n lot happened in if this had he said. WEATHER SAN ANTONIO (AP) A sealed in which troubl space cabin simulator caught fire spokesman said, at the School of Aerospace Medi- cine Sunday, seriously injuring one of its two occupants. The part of the Air worse Force Systems at space, Brooks Air Force Base Capt. Carl C. Fletcher Jr. of San Bernardino, Calif., was in serious condition at Lackland Air Force Base Hospital from smoke B- inhalation. His condition was first described as good, but several hours later he was placed on the serious list. The other occupant, Capt. Dean B. Smith of San Antonio, not seriously injured. Other officers credited quick action by the surveillance crew with keeping the two men from suffering even more serious in- jury A spokesman for the Air Force a Good Time!   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication