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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, August 24, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 24, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               QPfje IWene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE. SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron A 82ND YEAR, NO. i ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY MORNING, tTY-TWO PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated (ff) WEATHER PAGE ONE [By KatharynDuffj An informant who won't ad- mit her age says this is the way it was: The gadget of an earlier day was in the genera) shape of scissors minus cutting edges. One prong was a solid rod. The other prong was a half- circle of metal so designed as to snuggle onto the rod. Proper use of the gadget re- quired the use, too. of a kero- sene lamp a not unreason- able requirement for that day. You took the gadget and dropped it down into the chim- ney of the lighted lamp so that the handles held it suspended. After a proper time the gadg- el was removed, handles were pressed to open the prongs, the rod and its companion piece were wiped with a cuptnwel for the removal of collected soot. (This step was really unneces- sary if you happened to have black hair, i The cleaned, opened, still hot gadget was raised carefully to the head. Strands of hair were wrapped by hot fingertips around the rod. The other prong was allowed to come to rest on the locks. Sizzle. Hiss. The hair was curled. Or, more accurately, it was crinkled. For countless years the curl- ing iron, heated over the lamp, did its work for women. Then man, with straight- haired woman at his side, be- gan the climb into the age of electricity. The curling iron, woman de- creed, would grow a cord. It did. It was electrified. May- he it was electrified because the kerosene lamp to heat it had disappeared. But the electric curling iron didn't, at that time, come into its own as you might expect. "Permanent" n v i n g ma- chines did it in. "permanent" as in three or lour months. Away with Ihe home-scorched neck and the home-frizzled hair. The twin lorlure jobs were clone in the "beauty shop" under a Rube Goldberg contraption of wires ami rollers. Then that too. fell before the onslaught ol eiviliy.alinn. The machine-less wave made its appearance. Chemicals re- placed electric heal Beauly be- came painless or nearly so. The ultimate Was achieved. But even that rlirin'l halt prog- ress, learned by reading Re- porlcr News advertisements this week. The relentless pattern ol life holds as woman continues her struggle to change her looks. A local merchandising lirm announced through Hie paper it had available for the feminine public a gadget which does away with biindlcsomc rollers on Ihe head. With this there's no more sleeping restlessly on a head lull of curlers. The store announced it had lor sale: Klcctric curling irons! They've been improved. Ihese gadgets. Now heat is controlled and there come with the iron some rollers. Roll hair. Heat roller wilh iron. Preslo! Or. directions say. you can use the iron in the tradilional way. curling hair by wrapping it on the rod. And bow do curling irons sell? Very well, we hear, wherever curling irons are for sale. The store which adverliscd it.s irons sold mil by Wednesday aflernoon. II sen! off a rush or- der for a new supply. i i1 iiiisrY 1 11 v nvy HVIULJ m A _ _ Red Policeman Shot RUNNELS COUNTY BEAUTIES Betty Jost of Rowena, center, is the 1962 Rum ncls County Farm Bureau Queen. With her are Deanna Kozelsky of Winters, left, runner up. and Shirley Ehrig of Miles, the 1961 queen, on the right. The contest was held Thursday night in Ballinger. (Staff Photo by Henry Wolff Jr.) Rowena Beauty Crowned As Runnels FB Queen By tYNV HEINZERLIMG BERLIN (API East German guards with machine guns shot a young railway policeman at the Communist wall Thursday night as he fled to the West. He man- aged to stagger 15 feet into West Berlin, then collapsed and died. The shooting, second at the wall in six days, climaxed a day of multiple developments. The East German regime named one of its generals to take over in East Berlin from the So iet commandant whose job was abolished by Moscow Wednesday. The obvious Soviet intent is. tc force the Western allies on a course toward dealing wilh the unrecognized East German re- gime. The United States, Britain and France jointly served notice that Russia cannot end four-power rule of, Berlin without their con- sent. The test of wills over this iso- lated city 110 miles insid3 the other in the stomach. He had been shot as he tried to flee over a barbed wire fence from the Born- holmerstrasse Railway Station where he was a guard. West Berlin policemen heard the shots but were hindered in finding! the victim in the darkness. East j soldiers extinguished all lights at the station after the shooting. Wesar had climbed through the barbed wire and was just inside jWest Berlin when found. He died as he Was taken to a hospital, i Doctors said he may have been shot after he had reached West Related story, Pg. 2-B Berlin territory. They doubted that he could have made his way through the barbed wire with his wounds. He had his gun with him; it had not been fired. There were unexplained shots across the wall at another point in East Berlin Thursday night. Po- lice said they had heard 30 shots in the Kreuzberg-Treptow district. Later more shots were heard in the same locality, but nothing could be seen from West Berlin. The Wesar slaying occurred in the French sector. Because of the tension gripping Berlin, police and French troops quickly dispersed the crowd that gathered at tht scene on the Western side. Mayor Willy Brandt of West Berlin arrived soon after the shooting and helped to quiet the crowd, it eventually dispersed. Maj. Gen. Helmut Poppe, 35, was named by East Germany to com- mand both army units and border guards in East Berlin. Refusing to recognize him, the three Western powers declared Sec BERLIN, Pg. 2-A, Col. 1 Jacobs Points at Murphy As Having Favored Estes Iron Curtain brought vigorous So- official identified Undersecre- WASHINGTON oust-allotments should be allowed to afternoon with a tractor operator'ceded the queen judging was {contest. In the senior division, i given under the direction of Miss i Ocker, 16, son of Mr. and Mae Dim, several chil- Gilbert Ocker of Rowena By JIM EATON Reporter-News Staff .Writer I BALLINGER Betty .lost Rowena. 18. a 5-loot inch brunci'.'-. was judged Ihe first. Co'inly Farm Bureau Queen of: f irst pli at a contest held Thursday' division was Jerry Don Multer. night in Baliingcr City Park. 13, sm of Mr- anfl Mrs- Alfrai viet protests during the day against a U.S. military escort for Russians traveling 10 their war memorial in West Berlin. They threatened retaliation against American cars traveling in Com- munist-controlled territory. The new victim of the wall ter- ror was said by police to be about 19 years old. one year older than Peter Feeler, whose slaying by East German police last Friday touched off a of demonstra- tions that plunged Berlin into the current crisis. Fechter lay dying for nearly an hour before East German guards carried him away. West Berliners were en- raged at the Communists for shooting and embittered at Ihe Americans for failing to assist the dying youth. Three East Berlin soldiers brought down the young railway policeman. Hans Dieter Wesar, with a bullet in the head and an- participaled. First place winner in the .junior of Ball ger was master of ceremonies. Judges for the contest were Lou A graduate of St. Joseph. in Rowena, she is !L cn of Mr. and Mrs. iMuller of Olfen. Nine boys com- McDermott of the San Angolo Standard Times and Henry Wolff The crowd was welcomed at theijr. and Jim Eaton, both of the ;queen contest by Hugo Reporter-News staff. JRl. 3, Winters, Runnels County! Edward Cumbie of Bronte, area president. representative of the Texas A musical program which pre-'Farm Bureau, was tally clerk. Ann Joyce FB Queen At Coleman ..titu in the two divisions. [High School the daughle 'AKrcd .lost. Deanna Kozelsky of Winters, a cousin of Miss .lost, was runner- up. Miss Kozelsky. 18. is the! Idaueluer of Mr. and Mrs. Jocj Kozelsky. Miss Josl will compete in the ;District 7 Farm Bureau contest to j be held Sept. 1 at H p.m. at Junior College. The district winner will compete in Ihe stale contest. The oilier six contestants were Carolyn Wiley of Baliingcr: Mar- jccne Pritchard of Winaale; Caro-, llvn Hohcnsee of Miles: promised Thursday night some 'Frcv ol Olfcn Olcen Kay socialism, mjnounced his ruling Political Bu of and Sharon balcony speech to a crowd oflreau and others had. demanded i pierce of Glen Cove: and Judia of Winters clamoring for work and an [muzzling of the restless I.ynn Lawlis, Carolyn The annual Farm Bureau to cnaos "11! new'y intle-ilas' military leadership. Miller and Anita Morris, all of in" at'lended by an estimated i Pendent nation. i Some angry demonstrators had x'tileman. 1 ooo persons began Thursday1 Ben Bella made an to storm the central govern-1 Don Hart of the Coleman County Algerians Riot; Socialism Vowed ALGIERS (AP) Ahmed Ben an the historic Algiers Forum aft- thc crowd had de- COI.EMAN (RNS) Ann Joyce, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. J Joyce of Coleman. Thursday night was elected Coleman County Farm Bureau queen. Some 275 persons attended ceremonies held in the National Guard Armory. Beth Scott, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Scott of Coleman, was runner-up. Nine candidates were nominated for the honor, includ- ing Patsy Johnson of Novice: i Karen Jones of Gouldbusk; Betty stand. The witness said Murphy had! acreage involved for 1962 plant- ings. subcommittee is trying to presided at the session which whether the once attended also by Edwin A. Estes, now bankrupt and tary of Agriculture Charles S. Murphy Thursday as the man who decided to rescind cancella- tion of questionable cotton-acre-acting farm-aid administrator "fraud indictments, enjoyed age allotments made to Billie Sol'john C. Bagwell, department influence within the de- Estes. eral counsel: Ed Shulman, Bag- partment in obtaining more than But Emery E. Jacobs told Sen- well's assistant: Joe Moss, head 3000 acres Of cotton-growing allot- ate investigators that he feels an'of the cotton division; and possi-jmenis for 1961. also, whether such administrative breakdown within the department in Texas is the ly others. Jacobs recounted, as have earli- basic reason that Estes was able er witnesses, that John Dennison, to manipulate farm-aid programs'Estes' counsel, made a two-hour jheen obtained. influence figured in department delays in investigating the deals under which the allotments had to his own advantage. jacobs dismissed as meaning. ON TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS appeal for setting aside of a de-j Jacobs, forced out of his de-i partment action taken in (alk a threat by Estes to post because of his as-jcember to cancel the 1961 allot-j ,'ith Estes. confirmed tojments and deny Estes use of the I See ESTES, Pg. 2-A, Col. 2 the Senate investigations suhcom-i mittee the accounts of earlier wit- nesses about a Jan. 6 meeting which temporarily reversed can- cellation of 1961 cotton-acreage allotments to Estes. Murphy had been named as the top department official at the meeting which heard a plea from Estes for suspension of the allot- ment cancellation to allow the Texan time to gather evidence that the transaclions in which he obtained the allotments were le- gal The decision to allow Estes the Estes Arrested By Police Here Billie Sol Estes. much indicted West Texas financier, was arrest- ed in Abilene Thursday night and car around and waved to me as he did so." Slatton said that he followed the The decision to allow Estes Cadillac down the street and stop- added time was taken soon after charged with driving a motor ve-j he Estes and his lawyer had left the meeting which was attended also by Sen. Ralph Yarborough. D- Tex.. and Rep. J. T. Rutherford, D-Te.x. Jacobs said he did not believe and had never told anyone that the decision to rescind the can- cellation had been reached before the meeting was held. This came as a denial of earlier testimony. Chairman John L. McClellan, D-Ark., asked Jacobs. "The ac- tion was taken and the undersec- retary made the final decision Jacobs replied, adding. heard no voice raised in pro- test." Jacobs noled that his per- sonal conviction had been that the Capacity House At Fisher Rodeo ment building. Glass shattered iniElectric Cooperative served as windows and in the main en-1 master of ceremonies. Musical trance door. But police and fire i numbers were presented by Susan hoses turned back the attack, j clary. Suzette Swanson and Jana Shouts of approval greeted all of Coleman. Bella's promise of a Socialist fu-j Judges were Anson Oden and lure. Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Carter, all "The entire world is watching'of Rrownwood. Ben Bella said. "Unite Mrs. Maynard Gaines of Cole- around the political bureau." (UVathtr Man. I'airr 2-.il ARII.K.NK AND VICINITY (Hadins -in Mostly .sunny wilh sonic flf tor noon cloudiness'and tor .1 few widely sciittrrrr! aflcninm slmwcru Frldii.v ,ind Snturdny. UlKh Iwdh days PS-IOfl. Low Kriilny niuhl NOKT1I CP.NTHAI. AMI TKXAS: Clrni- to ;iml i.sol'Hrd Inlf unrl CCIIIJDIINJ hoi Friday and south Friday itiuh: ,init Saiiir- flay. Cloudy, scat It1 red tlujndrrshimrrs nml cooler mirlh Fridny nlKht and Sat- unjay. Ilish Krhlity NOHTHWKST TKXAS: cit.iitt.v nnd seal- trrrd thundfrstiowi'i s noi'lh cli'iu (o cloudy and Isolated (hiindi'ishowrrf winIh Fridny. Cloudy and Ixnl.'itcd Ihnn- dcr.shmvers Sjitnrdny' and nfttlh Friday ,ind  el Popovich jokingly told a So- was turned in by the veteran Aspcrmonl cowboy Fred Dalhy. His time was 13.3 seconds. Second best calf roping time was poslcd by Connie Mac Gibbs of Winters. Third place was Sheep Morrow of Clairemonl with 17.5 seconds. In the girl's barrel race three well known West Texas barrel riders were among the top three winners. Lynn Wilson of Sweet- water and Linda Merriott of Stam- ford finished in a tic with scores of seconds. Third was Jamie Crump of Stamford with a time of 17.5 seconds. In team lime Jack Mitchell of! 2. Promised agrarian reform ALGERIA, Pg. 2-A, Col. 4 The bucking horses in the H-KJAspermont was Ihe top winner in Rodeo Company string, bolh seconds with Jim Prathcr ol back and saddle bronc, were the majority winners Thursday night. Only one bareback bronc rider, Eddie Stewart n.' Post, turned in a score of points when he stayed alxwrd Helicopter the re- quired (I seconds. In Iho saddle bronc division, only two hronc riders qualified. Keith Lloyd (if Snyder scored 161) in 10.8. poinls on Sure Shol. and second place went In Virgil Slrirklin of Abilene wilh 141 poinls on Hopper. Clairemont with 21.2 seconds and Rilby Wallace of Clairemont third with 22.fi seconds. In the kids' flng race, Ted Hart of Aspermont turned in a ride of B." seconds for first pliwc. De.bbic Xachery of Swectwittcr was sec- ond with 9.3 seconds and Honnie Gardner of Aspcrmonl was third Only one hull rider made a qualifying ride. He was Don O'Donald of Swcctwaler, who marked up 146 poinls. FULL AGENDA FOR COMMISSION Abilene City Commissioners worked over a full agenda at their regular meeting Thurs- day. Action taken included: Ihe Abilene Paving Co. bid on the wid- ening of .1 part of Sayles Blvd.. work on which may start Monday. corrections on Ihe city tax rolls. bids on seal coal for the airporl runway, fire alarm equipment and pur- chases of vehicles and sewer pipe, -Authorized filling of 15 po. silions of deputy corporation courl clerks. -Heard that quick aclion will he taken on delinquent Inxes. Details of the, commission aclion will he found on I'g. 6-B. Youth Shot Accidentally ROCHESTER (RNS) A 13- year-old Rochester youth was in "fair" condition at Abilene's Hcn- drick Memorial Hospital Thurs- day night after being accidental ly..shot in the chest-with a .22 cat iber rifle. David Hollingsworth. 13, son ol Mr. and Mrs. Dee Hollingsworth. iped Estes after he.'Estes) hicle without a valid license and stop sign at s loth ancl Oak failing to stop at a stop sign. Estes, immediately after being Upon investigation, the offi- cer discovered, that Estes' license fingerprinted at the Abilene po-jhad been suspended about three lice station, placed a, phone call, years ago. Slatton said that Estes A few minutes later Attorney Bill [told him that he had since re- Thomas, former 42nd district at-jceived a letter from the Depart- torney, came to the station and jment of Public Safety saying that posted a appearance bond in Estes' behalf. his license would be reinstated if he would take a driving test, Slat- When Estes' made the call he I ton said that if the DPS did send asked for Johnny 'apparently his brother Dr. John The posting of the bond by Thomas and Estes requires ap- pearance in court at a later date. The casually dressed Estes. without his usual black horn rimmed glasses, would make no reply to questions of newsmen. Patrolman Don S. Slatton, ar- resting officer, said that he spot- ted Estes' 1962 Cadillac attempt- ing to turn onto a one-way street on the south side of town. "He started to go the wrong way so I waved him said such a letter, Estes would be charged with driving without a valid license. If the DPS did not send such a letter, the charge would be driving while license suspended, Slatton said that when he was filling out his report he was un- certain as to whether the Cadillac was a 1961 or 1962 model. "I asked him (Estes) which it was and he said he wasn't sure but he believed it was a 1961 model." Policeman Slatton, incidentally, received publicity last Christmas when he arrested "Santa Claus" Slatton. "He I Estes) turned the in Abilene. vict. television audience Thursday night he had failed to see God in space. The issue came up when the tel- evision announcer asked him and'cnicf of control section, director of fellow, cosmonaut Aralrian Niko- 0pCnltjong lavcv whether they had seen God. Brig.Gen.Wisman To Head 819th Brig. Gen. William W. Wisman, The announcer said the question had been submitted by a woman mand. Strategic Air Corn- Friday was named by Headquarters SAC to succeed Brig. Gen. Pinkham Smith as com- mander of the 819th Strategic '0 years old. Laughingly. Popovich replied: A ncc Divisi0n with headquar "Yes. 1 God. I asked him a', his name and he replied Andnan Gngoricvich Nikolayev. b Popovich added: "We didn't see I anything or anybody." At this point, cosmonaut Headquarters Gagarin'interrupted with a General Smith will report to USAF Sept. 4 as director for operations was shot in the chest abou' p.m. when a .22 rific being loaded his cousin. Roger Dale Smith, 18, discharged accidentally. Attendants at Rochester Clinic, where the injured youth was first laken. said the .22 caliber bullet struck him in the center of Ihe l and then went up and to Ihe left, lodging near the right arm- pit. According to Smith, the two youths were doing some target shooting about .TOO yards from the house when the accident oc- curred, Smilh and his father I. B. Smith, both of l.cvclland. were vis- iting the Hollingsworths. Altend.inls at Hendrick Ilospila! said the hullel would not be re- moved until sometime Friday. and'said: "The real God. the true forces, deputy chief of staff, oper- God. has very little speed. He's ations. Brig. Gen. Roger M. Crow, who By troika, Gagarin meant previously been announced as three-horse team which frequently the new commander of the 819th pulled Russian sleighs and wagons Strategic Aerospace Division, will in Ihe old days, hence something go to Ellsworth AFR. S D., Sept old-fashioned. NEWS INDEX SECTION A Sports Oil ntwi SECTION B Women's news..... Amuumcnli Comict TV Scout OkilHirici Itim ntwi, mttktfl 10, as the commander of the 821st Strategic Aerospace Division there. General Crow, presently deputy commander of the 1st Strategic 1-10 tJ 4, S __ 7 ...I t4 ...14 14 14-lf BRIG. GEN. R. M. CROW going lo Ellsworth Mass. General Nazzaro has beai Missile Division at Vandenberg >k. AFK. Calif., will succeed Maj. j nominated for promotion to Gen. Dclmar E. Wilson who will grade of lieutenant general. 'become deputy commander of Headquarters SAC also M- Fifteenth Air Force Sept 17. jnounced the assignment at tol. General Wilson replaces Maj. i Win :im II. Mnrttnsen, presently Gen. Joseph A. Nazzaro. who director of operations for Second presently is assigned to become Air Force, wilh neadqiiarttrs It the commander of Ihe Eighth Air llarksdalc AFB, La., as iForce (SAC) at Westovcr AFB. of control section, SAC. chief   

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