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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 12, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 12, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT YEAR, NO. 57 ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, 1 U.S. Sends Best Wishes To Spaceman 630 01 SVX3i SVT1VO ___________.__________________ 3Atf 3103 FOUR PAGES IN FIVE SECTIONS 9909 X9 03 S31VS Associated Press (It) By LEWIS GULICK WASHINGTON The U.S. government has wished the So- viet Union's orbiting spaceman a "happy landing" and in response to a Moscow request to endanger him with high-altitude atomic explosions. Simultaneously, the United States strongly rejected Satur- day a Soviet diplomatic note pro- testing alleged Western provoca- tions connected with the year-old, red-built, Berlin wall. The U.S. response labeled the Soviet note "an attempt to dis- [rac[ world attention from the ORBITAL PATH This map gives rough estimate fact that Aug. 13 (Monday) is the Of the orbital path of Soviet spaceship Vostok III first anniversary of the wall which is carrying cosmonaut Adrian Nikolayev around the earth. Exact details of orbit are not yet available from Moscow but the Soviet news agency Tass said the orbit is inclined 65 degrees to the plane of the ganda spectacie launched by the equator. Early statistics for the new flight were almost Kremlin to cover up lack of ac- identical to those of Vostok II which took Maj. Gher- tion on the German issue. man Titov around the globe. (AP Wirephoto) From this, they concluded that the Soviet Union is not likely to follow through quickly with any hard action which could ignite the potentially explosive Berlin sit- uation. It was noted that the Moscow protest made no mention of Pre- mier Khrushchev's proposed peace treaty with East Germany. Soviets Put Third Spaceman in Orbit outpouring on as a propa- Argentine Crisis Evidently Ended BUENOS AIRES. Argentina army chiefs ac- cepted a compromise choice Sat- urday night for war minister, ap- parently ending a four-day crisis that had brought Argentina close to civil war. President Jose Maria Guido, whose five-month-old regime was territory. nearly toppled in the upheaval, in retired Brig. Gen. Jose Corncjo Saravia, 53, and ordered rival troops that had ringed the capital back to their barracks. Saravia, Ions a foe of ex-dictator "a military dictator- Juan D. Peron, was proposed by the rebel leadership. He was de- scribed as SPACEMAN IN TRAINING Adrian Grigorievich u. s. strategists say that while Nikolayev, the Soviet Union's newest man in space, such a treaty in itself might not js as he experienced weightlessness during set off armed conflict over Ber- trajnjng according to Novesti, Soviet news and picture lin, it could have a serious effect ---------___---------------------------------------- the rebel cause, attended the On touchy situation there if agency, which released this photo. Today, Nikolayev is spinning around the earth in Vostok III as the third Russian in space. (AP Wirephoto) swearing-in ceremony at the gov- ernment building. Soon afterward, police released units that had been held ready throughout the crisis, and the air force lifted a ban on private or the Reds try to use it to oust Western troops. The Communists claim Berlin's access routes should be brought under the Red East Germans' control. The Soviet "appeal" not to hurt At the height of the crisis, some unscheduled flights over Argentine cosmonaut Andrian G. Nikolayev, carried by the Soviet news agen- cy Tass, reached what Washing- rebel leaders said they were officials regarded as extreme ing for Guiuo's scalp and not heights. a Cabinet reshuffle. They defined The Moscow statement omittef their objective as the creation of mention of the newly resumed Mercury Hits 111 At Wichita Falls By THE ASSOCtATED PRESS ifro'nt would wane quickly andj Texas'blistering heat wave roll-jleave most Sunday temperatures on Saturday with temperatures around the 100 mark again with to 111 degrees. A weak, timid jmaximums in the northwest sec- front reached the Panhandle- testing including the hu ship to rule the country for at Plains area but had little effect. of Lt In 1945, the new war minister cific. President Kennedy has said This heat Wave is feeding on Gen. Arturo Ossono Arana, a pre-iwas Maximum temperatures for the itself" a weather bureau observ- by a massive high pressur back to their barracks and bases result, Cornejo Sara- .Loyalist elements in the army laid they accepted the compro- mise war minister in the interests ef the Guido government and the constitution. Only 50 to 60 people, most of them army officers identified with 'ia's career was almost ruined. ie received no troop commands and was forced to retire from active service in 1951. But he came back in 1955 after Pcron's McM Given Gift A new cash gift of has been made to McMurry College through the United Capital Funds campaign, it was announced by the president's office Saturday. Mrs. W. P. Newell, Methodist lay leader, rancher and philan- thropist from Albany, handed the check to Dr. Gordon Ben- nett, McMurry president, in his office and specified that the gift is for McMurry's use, although a part of the state-wide United Cap- ital Funds for Texas Methodist Higher Education campaign. The gift will be used toward the completion of McMurry's planned Science Center, Dr. Bennett laid. "Mrs. Newell continues to be one of the best friends McMurry College Dr. Bennett said. "We are most grateful to her not only for this recent gift, but for her life-long dedication to Mc- Murry College and Christian edu cation." He pointed out that Mrs. Newell MCMURRY, pg. H-A, coi. i partmcnt responded with this Southwcsfs last, devastating sentence statement: "We wish i seven year drought. Grass fires Major Nikolayev a safe flight and I broke out near Fort Worth but happy landing. The put out. overthrow. He was forced to retire again n 1957, in the midst of a crisis reportedly touched off by military- demands for a tough crackdown on all Peronists. It was a victory at the polls last March by Peronist supporters :hat brought a military overthrow of President Arturo Frondizi, still detained on an island on the River Plate, and the installation of the Guido government. Toranzo Montero, reportedly claiming the backing of 85 per cent of Argentina's 75.000 troops, sroclaimed himself the army's commander in chief last Wednes- day and demanded the resignation o{ the incumbent war secretary, .luan Bautista Loza. In swift succession he obtained the resignation of both Loza and a veteran whom Guido-appointed war secretary to succeed Loza, Lt. Gen. Eduardo Scnorans. Sen- orans was the first chief of staff after the military ousted dicta- tor Juan D. Peron in 1955. The crisis in some ways paral- leled the bloodless uprising in Peru) that deposed President Manuel j Prado and put a military junta in power in Lima July Ifi. The United Stales suspended diplomatic relations with Peru and tut off economic and military aid. Informed sources in Wash- ington said the United Slates is now ready to restore recognition, perhaps next week. States, of course, contemplates no activities that would interfere with him in any way." As for the Kremlin's diplomat- ic protest to the Western powers concerning Berlin, which was re- ceived here Friday night shortly before Moscow made it public. State Department press officer Joseph W. Reap issued a public comment saying in part: "The charge contained in the note that the three Western pow- ers (Britain, France, the United States] and the government of the Federal Republic (West Germany) have been Organizing provocations against the Soviet Union and the East German Communist regime are completely groundless and can only be ascribed to misinfor- mation or to a conscious attempt to deceive world opinion." Dallas added its fourth heat prostration case of the summer siege. One death, in Beaumont, has been attributed to the heat. The Weather Bureau took the cold front lightly and said it would fade as it advanced into the 100- plus temperatures on Texas' in- which has been sitting on Texas for days. The observer, Lewis Croom of the Dallas weather stat- tion, said nothing was in sight to drive out the heat. The sizzling weather equaled another record at Houston when it pushed the thermometer to 100 for the sixth day in a row. It matched a record set Aug. 10-11, terior. It was expected to reach line from Fort Worth to Mid- land by Siinday night. Relief Likely From Heat NEWS INDEX SECTION A Business Outlook 5 To Your Good Health------ 11 Oil news 12 Obituaries............. 13 SECTION C Women's news 1-14 TV Scout Radio-TV laojt 4 SECTION 0 Sports 1-4 Dyess Pix Past 5 Amusements 6, 7 Bridge news 6 Book naws 12 Form news 13 Ctiutcfi newt 14 1948. The range report was an aver- age taken II days ago. Conditions have skidded sharply since then The Weather Bureau said the under the blistering heat and up to 42 days without rain in some sections. Maximum temperatures for the day included Abilene 103, Amaril- lo 92, Austin 103, Beaumont 102, College Station 102, Corpus Chris- ti 92, Childress 103, Dallas 103. El Paso 101. Fort Worth 102, Galvcston 93, Houston 101, June- COSMONAUT'S MOTHER This is Alexeynevna Nikolayev, mother of the Soviet's third cosmonaut, Maj. Adrian G. Nikolayev. Russia's .latest man in space was launched from earth early Saturday morning. Speculation arose that he might stay aloft as long as a week. (AP Wirephoto) ________ Space Trip Might Last Several Days MOSCOW (AP) The Russians hurled their third astronaut into orbit Saturday on a world-girdling voyage that may last several days or even a week. By 5 a.m.. Sun- 11 p.m. Saturday, the spaceman had circled the earth more than 12 times and travelled more than miles, _ the Soviet news agency Tass said. The newest astronaut, Maj. An- drian G. Nikolayev, moved about in his space ship, ate three meals, and slept seven hours. Tass and Moscow radio broadcasts said. Nikolayev was shown repeatedly on Soviet television. He awoke at 5 a.m. Moscow that everything was normal aboard the ship, Tass said. His spaceship went into orbit at a.m.. Saturday. Moscow time p.m. EST Saturday. Moscow radio said his three meals on the first day of his his- toric flight included one of natural food. Previous spacemen. Soviet and American, had taken their food from tubes. There was no official word on how long Nikolayev planned to stay in orbit, but there a speculation of a record-shattering flight of a week. A Soviet broadcast said Premier Khrushchev mentioned in a mes- sage to the astronaut that he would have "quite a number of orliits." Niknlayev reported that his ap- petite was good ami that wcisht- lessness caused him no qualms. Soviet reports said he took the controls twice, enabling him to direct orientation of the ship. Tass said that when he resumed contact with the earth after his sleeping period the ship was under automatic control. At the same time, a check was being made of his health. The Kremlin urged Washington to withhold high-altitude nuclear tests that might imperil their See RUSSIAN, Pg. 14-A. Col. S Abilcnians mav gel some during the weekend from the swcl-j m- tering heat that has pushed 103- Midland 102, Mineral mercury up past the 100 degree Wells 104, San Angelo 106. San mark for eight straight days, ac- irding to James Doty at the Abi- lene Weather Bureau at Munici- pal Airport. Doty said a cold front that runs across the south plains had moved as far south as Lubbock Saturday Antonio 103. Victoria 100, Waco 105, Presidio Browmvoocl 107. Wink 102 and British Order Deportation Of Dr. Soblen, Soviet Spy By ANTHONY WHITE LONDON issued an order Saturday night for the deportation of Dr. Robert A. So- blen, but left open the question of when the convicted Soviet spy "The order was served on Dr.lin the new directions was can- Soblen in Brixton Prison by the police. "As announced this morning, directions were given to El Al Air- lines under Article 8 (one) of the be returned to the States to serve a life prison sen- tence. Sobien's attorneys immediately j announced they will challenge the iMiic.iialiens order requiring them to re......... move Dr. Soblen from the United that he should order Dr. Soblen s Kingdom on the flight which had been scheduled to leave London The Travis County Sheriff's-Do-j partmcnt appealed Saturday night j for volunteers to fight a brush j fire that broke out in the sun- I order in the British High Court, where it appeared to have be-jdrcnched. baked area near Lake come stationary. It may get as j Travis. Officers said one home in far south as Abilene SaturdayjVoienti had burned, night or Sunday, bringing some rain into the area, he said. The forecast is for partly cloudy with a few widely scat- tered afternoon showers Sunday and Monday. The high is expect- ed to reach near 100. with Ihc low about 75. First Anniversary of Berlin Wall WEATHER By CARL HARTMAN BERLIN (AP) Kast German Communists moved armor and hough it was too dark lo make out just what it was doing there. The Communists, showing signs truckloads of troops up to Ihc of growing nervousness about the Berlin wall early Sunday as the first anniversary of the steel and concrete barrier across the city neared. wall, fired off a scries of diplo- matic notes to the United Stales, Britain and France about the situ- man atop the Brandenburg Gate, German satellite have n direct interest in the wall and what may happen lo it on its first birthday Monday. West Berlin police also reported Soviet truck at the gait al West across the lars, saw Sunda water cannon and truckloads back from the Western troops being moved up. Ameri-'of Ihc wall. They were under cans who drove through Kast ders to let no trouble start thai Berlin about midnight said it was the Communists could use as nn ation in Berlin. One set came calm and quiet. At Checkpoint cxcnsc for a crisis, Berlin and West German author! apparently emphasizing that the tics of plotting "serious new prov- Russians as well as their East orations" along the wall. An East German note pro- tested the presence in Berlin of West German President Heinrich anniversary on a U.S. Air Force plane. Berlin police, might happen on its annh le wall through binocu-versary was shared in West Sunday ni; armored halftracks.lin. Police here were keeping II. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WEATHER ni (Wralhrr miin. nflge ,VR> ARII.ENE AMI VICINITY (Radius 40 Tartly clnirdy and hot with a lew widely M-attcred afternoon showers Sunday and .Monday. HiHh days near KMt. low Sunday niKtit near 75. SOUTHWEST TKXAS Clear to part- ly cloudy Sunday and Mrarhy. Wiilelj tiered shim-er.-, in north and not quilt tior late Sunday and Monday. Hlnti in extreme north. NOIITH TKXAS Fair and Monday. lliuli .Sunday 98-105 TKXAS Pair Sunday Not quite so hot in north- Ik'ht and Monday. High Sat- thus indicating another long le- gal wrangle over Sobien's pres- ence in Britain. Official sources said the govern- ment will not attempt to deport Soblen until there has been a court test of the order. "Dr. Soblen is still in Brixton Prison tonight and he will not be caving a British Home Office spokesman said. The deportation order was is- sued after the government chalked up its fourth failure in efforts to force Israel's state- a-ned El Al Airline to fly So- blen to the United States. A formal announcement by the Home Office said the immign iion service had been auuioraed to place the 61-year-old psychia- trist aboard any ship or airmail leaving Britain. The announce- ment added that. Home Secretary Henry Brooke intends to put So- The Soviet Union, itself, had a from Moscow. H accused West Charlie, main crossing point for On Monday, there will be three non-Germans, it was an unevent- ful evening. minutes of silence at noon, with West Germans contemplated I traffic lights set at red. The free- with sndness the anniversary bell will toll from atop West the day the Reds began city Hall, but not the the WV4 miles of (heir border j Uichke, who came here for the through (he cily with cement. bricks, barbed wire and steel. Nervousness about the wall ami church hells. Protesting and Uo man Catholic leaders decided this would be inadvisable. DU ti-00 t. p.m ion nn 101 loo 93 ilfl........ HtKh and low tor 24-hotirs p.m.: 11W awl 14. High and low dalf lart year nltjht: lunrlw May: Ilinwl lonlBM: llaromeltr at 9 p.m.: Humidity al 9 p.m. 42 ctnl. complied with to arrange for Sobien's removal nn an aircraft the government directive con- bound for the United States. jtaincd no mention of any penalties The scheduled flight specified I to be imposed on the airline. celed by El Al. The secretary of state has giv- en very car eful consideration to all the circumstances of the case and has come to the conclusion deportation." The Home Office announcement Airport at 8 p m yesterday but came after a day in which the government considered at lengtn was delayed until today. "These directions Jirections, previously and twice extended courses open to it. following liven to failure of Israel's state-owned but notj El Al Airline to fly Soblen to New York. Contrary to expectations. 7 Persons Killed Near Hale Center HALE CENTHR. Tex. truck apparently struck butane tank truck and a pickup [the truck broadside, collided in flames near this! The bodies of Boone and his South Plains towns Saturday night killing seven persons. were taken to Hale Cen- ter. The bodies of the Owen (am- funeral home at nearby were taken to Abcriiathy. nathy identified the occupants of Attendants at the funeral home ItlllllY IIH-MUIII.U ml. ui j the pickup truck as Mr. and 'he Owen family wed six blen'aboard a U.S.-bound plane. jBillic Joe Owen, a farm The deportation order appeared and their three children, two i miles north of ami a mile east of to suspend Britain's wrangle with Israel over enforcing Sobien's de- and a boy The driver of the truck was identified as Milton Roone. about partnre on an El Al airliner............................____ "As we are no longer directly 3g_ an cnlpinyc of the Hale Center concerned, we have no comment His young daughter, Sher- to an El Al spokesman !rVj 5 in the blazing truck said, Scab with her lather. The Mid: Home Office statement "Home Secretary Henry Brooke this afternoon made an or- der for the deportation o( Dr. Robert Soblen. Positive identification of the vie- itims was not made until after the p.m. cras.h officers said the bodies were I mass of charred flesh. It was the second seven-death crash in this area in three days. A car-train crash near Shallo- State Police said the Thursday night killed >cv. occurred nt the intersection of two, m teen-agers en route from farm roads where high, weedsloiton ,irca to Lubbock (or Sun- .hampered vision. Police said thc'day School picnic.   

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