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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 9, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 9, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT A- -JlU -JL' -JU- fi96t ot M 82ND YEAR, NO. 54 ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Associated Preu (IP) PAGE ONE [By Katharyn Duff j EDITOR'S NOTE Today's guest, columnist for vacation- ing Katharyn Duff is Frank Meyers Jr., in civilian life manager of Elmwood Memo- rial Park, in recent months, Lt. Col. Meyers, commander of the local military unit on active duty. Col. Meyers and the other returning reservists will be honored at a civic luncheon today at the VFW. By FRANK MEYERS JR. Looking back some 10 months and 21 days 'hours and min- ulcs which have been so im- portant aren't any longer! I re- call a certain lieutenant colonel, V. S. Army Reserve, making an announcement to his unit ad- vising them MEYERS Then some 16 hours later, a phone call came advising this lieutenant colonel that AP said his unit HAD been recalled. That was September 19, 1961. or Black Tuesday, as the day has been referred to in the 490th Civil Affairs Co. of Abilene, Texas. At 2400 hours (midnight to civ- ilians) 11 August the main body of the 490th will be offi- cially released from active duty after serving approximately 10 months on active duty at Ft. Gordon. Georgia. These 10 months have been rather trying months and to say that we are glad to be home would be the understatement of the year. Based on the near-perfect training record of the 490th, the Defense Department saw fit to call it for active duty and it was the only Civil Affairs unit to arrive ill Ft. Gordon with a delinite mission. This mission was duty in Western Europe within approximately 90 days and upon completion of the training cycle. The overall opinion of the men is that their talents and capa- bilities would have been put to a far better use hail the unit been used ill this capacity. This mission was later rescinded and then the tough job began of sitting around and waiting for something definite to do. There is no doubt about the statement thai a man who doesn't Iccl useful has many problems. The fact that 75 per cent of the men in the arc college men made this more of a problem. As commanding officer of the unit I am extremely proud of the performance turned in by these men. Surely there was room for improvement but the records will show that the 490th had the most outstanding record on active duly of all Civil Af- fairs units, including three Reg- ular Army outfits serving at Ft. Cordon. The 490th was the only unit to receive "superior" on the Army training lest and upon completion of this lest was ready for assignment anywhere in the world. At this point one found him- scll with mixed emotions. The men wanted something con- structive to do but at the same time were not anxious for an- other Korean incident or shoot- ing war to start in order to jus- tify their call-up or to prove their capability. It was at this lime that the big question of 19til-02 really began to hit hard. "Why And then the pub- licity, mostly bad, aggravated Ihe situation to a point of seri- ous and real concern for mili- tary officials. Fortunately, the 490th did not fall into this category. There were morale problems. There were trying days. Hut I am hap- py to state (hat we once again were the only unit on the post that went through (he entire duly without any courts-martial or serious disciplinary prob- lems. This is an indication of the caliber of men who com- prise this unit. As you read this we still have men from the 490lh in Thailand, (Jermmiy and Panama, men who volunteered for extended service on specific missions, hut most of us nrc hack home. Those few MKVKUS, I'g. 2-A, Col. I JFK Plans Hit By Rockefeller f THE FINAL TOUCHES Workmen Wednesday night were busy putting the fin- ishing touches on Westgate Shopping Capital on West Highway 80 at Pioneer Dr., in preparation for Thursday's 9 a.m. formal opening ceremonies. In addition to the work being completed inside the ma 11 Wednesday, other workers were busy on the parking area outside. (Staff Photoj Westgate Doors To Open Today Workmen were busy Wednesday night at Westgate Shopping Capi- ____ tal getting ready for the opening of the shopping complex jCity Thursday in ceremonies at See Westgate Section C (-City Auto Death Brings Murder Count Manager Robert Tinstman members of the City Com- a.m. jmission and county officials are Four days of celebration will be- to lake part in Thursday's cere- gin following the ribbon-cutting monies, ceremonies but hundreds of COLORADO CITY (RNS) Charges of murder with an auto- '.mobile were filed here Wednes- 'day against Kenneth X. Carson. so because our governmen .seems to be in the process of mak 21, of Sweetwater, in the death Policy Said Hearing That Of Soviets NEW YORK Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller ac- cused the Kennedv administration Wednesday of having "moved steadily toward the Soviet posi- tion" on nuclear weapons testing and control. He detailed changes in the U.S. position since President Kennedy :ook office, referred to reports :hat a new U.S. proposal embody- ng concessions is contemplated, and said: "In short, weakening the proposals of March 1961, by he Kennedy administration even :urther seems to me to run a high risk of endangering our national security." The attack by Rockefeller, a candidate for re-election this No- vember and regarded as a pos- sible Republican presidential con- tender in 1964, was contained in a prepared statement. Rockefeller said he was "com- pelled by conscience and a sense of responsibility" to speak out be- cause of two developments: 1. Soviet resumption of nuclear tests this month. 2. Completion of the U.S. nucle- ar test series except for two or three high-altitude tests in which equipment failed. "I feel all the more compellee ing decisions in regard to this persons got a preview of the cen- ter and its 22 business establish-! lo- As the ribbon is cut opening the S'Sanlic complex, individual, store managers will cut ribbons at 12-year-old Robert Free, son ofjmatten may well prove Mr. and Mrs. Otis 0. Free of Col-jbe irrevocable, with virtually no ments Wednesday night. It catcd between Pioneer Drive and Winters Freeway on S. 1st. A reception, dinner and special showing started Wednesday as master of ceremonies at cutting program.j local civic orado City. Justice of Peace T. E. Arnold (hey bond a, visilors customcrs.jbei hdd Wednesday night ny Aeries. Dallas, origi- Birds, will public discussion of the facts anc issues Rockefeller said. Carson was, these chanRes lnjhe said had been made in the Mitchell County Jail. Leland W. May of Sweetwater, a leader and U.S. position: Inspection Stations Reduction j passenger in the car with Carson, j demands for 21 international stations within the Soviet Union was not charged. _ _. I to 19. He added, "The President Bicycles ridden by the youth and has now indicated that we are p.m.. with approximately 150 ipersons attending a dinner in 'att's Cafeteria at p.m. Illughcs. president, was host to will be introduced. invitation I In preparation for the traffic The first official appearance oflstate highway department work-j struck about p.m. Tuesday jviet-manned) inspection stations Penny Lee Hudd, 18. of have been cleaning up U.S. 80, near the east city j under some form of international inewlv named "Miss Texas." Westgate The Jones boy suffered only supervision. his companion, Kelly Jones, were prepared to accept national (So- 5 i have been engaged in construc- tion of a short road from the ac- nl'l be welcomed to 80 in front of the shopping complex. be at festivities on Friday from p.m. to 9 p.m. She w officially by Marion Dubbs, reigning "Miss Abilene" who com-! City traffic engineers have petcd against Miss Hudd for the traffic pattern and "Miss Texas" title. j installed a new traffic light at Pio- Gianl "Texas Size" scissors will be used in the ribbon-cutting ccr- rierground disturbances were liiri- ncer Dr. and Highway 80. And a ..._ __. GO-foot-lall sign carrying the Wesl- Mayor C. R. Kinarcljgalc insignia has been installed. Pulitzer Official Cites R-N Series ing their bicycles on the left side of the highway, westbound, and that the car driven by Carson washed to 20 out of perhaps 100 early traveling east. Moments after the in the Kennedy administration accident, Carson was stopped by and "now the President has indi Colorado City policeman. cated 'ha' we are ready to con Officers said they stopped the further reductions." car about 100 yards from the! Moratorium on Small Tests scene of the accident because thejThe Kennedy administration ac- vehicle was being driven without ccPted a 36-month moratorium on ights. They said they did not learn about the accident until lat- A salt water pollution series written by Katharyn Duff. Report- er-News Assistant Editor, has been cited by a Pulitzer Prize awards per that values the respect of its community must not hesitate to delve into urban renewal, educa- tion, science and medicine, social official as "compelling public utilities, roads and newspapers are [housing, and many another subject that once was thought to be of their that American broadening and deepening concept of public service. Commenting on the Reporter- News scries, published last sum- mer, was John Ilohcnberg, secre- tary of the advisory board on the Pulitzer Prizes and a professior of journalism at the Columbia Uni- versity Graduate School of Jour- nalism. His views were contained in the summer issue of "Columbia Journalism published quarterly by the Columbia journ- alism school. Miss Duff's scries won her the national Thomas Stokes Award for outstanding writing in a daily newspaper on development and conservation of natural resources. "Thirty five or forty years ago." Professor llohenberg wrote, 'when the newspaper press had a near monopoly on the news and the world seemed far less complicated, many a good Ameri- can newspaper considered its pub- lic duly fulfilled when it helped send a rascal to jail. That is not enough today." And until recent years, with few exceptions, newspapers' investiga lory work, he stated, was limited to rooting mil of grail and corrup- tion, and an occasional foray in dclense of civil liberties. "Now, in addition, any newspa 5 lillle public said the Review" article. To support his contentions. Pro- fessor llohenberg, a veteran of 25 years of working newspapers ex- perience before he came to Co- umbia, cited Pulitzer Prize nom- ination exhibits on file at the Uni- versity. Documentation revealing such trends." he explained, "is readi- ly available in the more than 700 newspaper exhibits thai were sub- mitted from all parts of the coun- try during the Pulitzer Prizes' sea- son just past." There will not be found among these leaders, he added, any ol the ragtag factions of the Ameri- can press, which still insists, dc- minor injuries. Seismic Disturbances De- Officers said the boys were for inspection of an "ade- quate number" of unidentified un DOUBLE ARM-LOAD Sgt. L. E. Robison Jr., mem- ber of Ranger's National Guard unit, had a double- Key City's 'Welcome' Due Today Abilene will say "welcome home" to members of the 49th Division National Guardsmen and 490th Civil Affairs Company Army Reservists Thursday with a luncheon at a.m. at the VFW building. Headlining the event will oe talks by Maj. Gen. Thomas R. Yancey of Austin, 8th Corps com- mander, and Lt. Col. Frank W. Meyers Jr., commanding officer of the returning 490th Civil Af- fairs Co., which arrived home this week from Fort Gordon, Ga. James Lauderdale, president ot the Chamber of Commerce, will be master of ceremonies. Mayor C. R. Kinard will welcome demobilized men home and mu- sic will be played by The Har- din-Simmons University Cowboy Band. Invocation will be given by Lt. Col. Weldon Barnett, chaplain- with Abilene's 425th Civil Affairs Group. Gen. Yancy is scheduled to rive at Municipal Airport at a.m., just 40 minutes before the luncheon. The returning soldiers, their wives and children, will be guests at the luncheon and at least 500 persons are expected to attend. "This is to be a community ex- arm load Wednesday his 17-month-old daughter, pression of gratitude for a job Jan and a-plate of barbecue. Men of the unit, who re- well done." Lt. Col. C. o. Shiflet, turned home from Fort Polk, La.. Tuesday, were hon- --------J- ored at a noon barbecue Wednesday. (Staff Photo) Ranger Welcome Is Texas-Style By NORMAN FISHER Reporter-News Staff Writer RANGER Citizen --soldiers j from this area who are membeis of the 49th Armored Division gotiwel a Texas-style welcome from commander of the 425th CA Croup, said. "Any Abilene Reservist or National Guardsman called to active duty is invited." he said. Tickets may be purchased fof S1.75 from Col. Shiflet at OW 2- 6193, Chuck Spicer at OR 3-7377, or the Chamber of Commerce at OR 4-7241. Col. Meyers said about 70 men from his company are expected to attend the luncheon. The unit will be mustered from active duty at midnight Saturday. Aug. 11. A rear party including Col. Meyers, will remain on active duty until ly prepared to serve A ,0 compiete tne necessary when the world was Other picture, Pg. 1-B home folks and the weather here Wednesday. at the seams in 1940., Last October we were at war just as much as in 1940. but it was difficult to prepare our- mentally to serve our Yoiing, Free was born Sept. 6, 1949 in Colorado City and would have been in junior high school this coming school year. Funeral arrangements arc pending at Kiker and Son Funer- al Home. Survivors are his parents: pa- ternal grandmother, Mrs. Mattic Hardin; seven sisters, Mrs. Rob- ert Boland and Wanda Free, both of Modesta, Calif., Mrs. Jerry Garrett of Forsan, Mrs. Lanny McKinney, Jackie Sue Free, Don- na Lois Free, and Rhonda Gay Free, all of Colorado City; and three brothers. Rex, in the mili- tary service, and Jerry Joe and James, both of Colorado City. all explosions "below the thrcsh- hold of modifying the position that such a moratorium went last only until a test ban Sec NUCLEAR. Pg. 2-A. Col. 3 NEWS INDEX SECTION A Obituaries......... Food news Spam Oil news SECTION B Women's news..... Editorials Amusements....... Comics Radio-TV logs...... TV Scout.......... Form news, markets SECTION C Westgate opening J, 3 7 10-13 ...14 2, 3 4 5 10 14 14 15 1-32 More than 225 friends, and relatives ignored wilting peratures of near 100 degrees fete the 51 state Rep. Scott Bailey of Cisco Rn l32CnT Artillery who Scn- Crcighlon's" praise of placed on active duty with men 01 accip ing e members of the Texas Natioi Guard Division last October. Main body of the unit returned home Tuesday. They will be for- mally released from active duty at p.m. Thursday. being j called to active duty, adding "lit- tle did we dream a wall in Ber- lin would affect us here in East- "jland County." "They don't pick sloppy units for work like you have Breck Guard Musler-Out Slafed Today The mid day activities were R ,.Thev ick sponsored by the City of Ranger- and the Ranger Chamber of Com- and were held in the Na- tional Guard Armory here. Most Ranger businesses closed their doors, during the noon hour to permit wide attendance at the "welcome home" ceremonies and barbecue. Ranger Mayor Morris Newnham was master of ceremonies for the brief ceremony which preceded the noon barbecue. He officially! ones that are trained and ready." Capt. Bill K. Caft'ee Wells, commanding officer BRECKENRIDGE (RNS) Members of Breckenridge's Bat- B. 3rd rocket howitzer bat- of the 49th Armored 132nd artillery will be form- mi reiiuy. of Mineral mustered out of active serv- jfficer ofi'ce Thursday in ceremonies begin- to thejning at p.m. on the Court- welcomes for men of the lawn. "We did not expect to be back! At the request of men in in Ranger this soon when we organized social evenU last October." the captain said.j have been planned for the occa- adding that he and other Thc bcfore the unit men feel "we have completed mobilized Oct. 15. 1962, it was 'feted at a barbecue attended by caffec pointed out that members ,he arc to than 500 well wishers! friends and relatives. The mustering out becomes ef- welcomed the men back to (hcir cjvic responsibilities homes "on behalf of the 10 months ago. when thejfective as of midnight Thursday of Ranger." .'division was called to active and the unit's first drill after re- State Sen. Tom Crcighton of Hoskell Officials Blocked In Water Authority Fight UASKKLL (RNS) District Judge Sterling Williams of Sny spite a steady depletion of its num-ider issued a temporary order hers, lli.it it can get by on crime, comics, a headline dash of sex Wednesday against Ilaskcll officials to restrain them from and an occasional one day cm- hiring attorneys to tight the [North Central Texas Municipal The Reporter-News Authority, was among nearly 50 newspapers j Judge Williams set a hearing mentioned in the article "as cv-jfor next Wednesday on a pcrma idence of growth and sophistica- tion in responsible American jour- nalism." Bullet Wound Fotol HOUSTON lAPl-Joseph Price pnycr and resident, was auto- Jr., 21, died Tuesday from malically disqualified to hear the bullet wound in the head, lease. ncnt injunction against the offic- ials. Willinms was appointed to preside in the place of 39th Dis- trict Court Judge Hen Charlie Chapman, who as a Haskcll tax In a petition filed by a group of I arc Raymond Davis. Otho Nanny, Iliiskell taxpayers, they asked Sogo, R. 0. Stephenson, John a permanent injunction be issued TDomas, all aldermen, and E. J. no( for handout. We want to work, to get something for something said. he WEATHER S. DKI'ART.MKXT OF COMMERCE HKATIIIili Rt'KKAI! iWrallirr Mali. I'w S-BI ABII.F..VF. AM) VICINITY (Radius 40 i's) Fair ami Ihroush Friday. "to prohibit the officials of Ha kell from paying out any further money belonging to the city of Haskril for attorney fees to pro- secute any suit or suits against the North Central Water Author- ity." Thc hearing grew out of a suit filed Tuesday afternoon, styled John Kimbrough, et a! vs. J. E Wallings (mayor of el al. Listed with Kimbrough as plaintiffs are Bob Hcrrcn, E. J. Steward, .1. B. Strain, and Jetty Clare. Also named as defendant! Arbuckle, city secretary treasurer. The plaintiffs contend that the mayor and aldermen have been hiring attorneys "to deieat and destroy Ihe water authority dis- trict established and created by the state of Texas and in no way governed by the city ol Haskcll." Opponents of the project, attack- ing the legality of the district, lost in a suit initiated in the district court here and on an appeal to See ORDER, Pg. 2-A, Col. I NORTH CF.NTRAL. NORTHEAST. AND NOKTIIWKST TF.XAS Fair and hot M'irs..lay and Friday. Hljth Thursday MOT. snrTHWKST TF.XAS Clear and hoi Thursday and Friday. Hish Thursday 100-1 OH. TKMfKK ATI KKS l-hl- "-v near 100, low Thursday a.m. 75 7.1 72 92 95 Hllh and p.m.: 101 and 73. Wed. p.m. 97 98 100 100 yoo fl-or) low for 24-hours fitting 9 97 94 K date last year: IIIKh anil I 'jhmwt 1 aunrtte lodan: suntfl tonight: Baromirlor 9 p.m. HimMIU M v.m.i 41 Mr tt.lt. turning to National Guard status is scheduled for Aug. 24. Welcome-home signs dot street! of Rreckenridge, flags have besi flown in honor of the unit's return and Mayor Ted Brown has pro- claimed the week as "Welcome Home Battery B" week. During Thursday's ceremonies, one of the men, Sgt. Robert H. Mehaffey, will be commissioned a second lieutenant. He completed Officers Candidate School at Fort Polk, La. but was not commis- sioned in Louisiana. Over at Cisco, a huge welcome was planned for the members of Battery C on Friday. A swimming party for guardsmen and their families to scheduled for Lake Cisco Park swimming pool and afterwards A barbecue supper and watermekw feed will be held. The swimming party will bt) held from 5 until 7 p.m. and UM meal from 7 until t p.m. UM town band will perform during the supper.   

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