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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, August 1, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 1, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 4- 82ND YEAR, NO. 46 "ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY MORNING, AU oi SVX31 SVT1VO .'AGES IN TWO SECTIONS (ff) PAGE i nrn MMfr Hometown boy makes-good note: Milburn McCarty, former Eastland youlh, now heads his own advertising and public re- lations firm in Manhatten, a firm which handles, among other accounts, non-diplomatic relations of the Congo with the people of the United States. McCarty's picture appeared in a recent Newsweek magazine study of the "foreign the American firms retained to tell the story ot other lands. Before taking the Congo ac- count the first of the year. News- week says. McCarty checked with the State Department and "we found the Administration completely backed the Congo- lese central government." McCarty's father, Milburn McCarty Sr., was formerly an Eastland attorney and presi- dent of the West Texas Chamber of Commerce in the 30's. The senior McCarty left his Eastland practice in 194." to become an assistant I1. S. Attorney General in the anti-trust division. He died in Washington in 1959 at age 79. McCarty Jr. was a Marine combat correspondent in the Pa- cific in World War 11 and was a staff writer for the New York- Herald Tribune and for New Yorker magazine before open- ing his New York public rela- tions agency. Newsweek described McCarty as "the boyish, tanned, crew- cut president of the agency" which bears his name. "For a fee of S2.000 a month McCarty has been selling the regime of Premier Curille Adoula and President Joseph Kasavuba, including last win- ter's visit of Adoula to the U. Newsweek recounts. Mrs. Dallas Scarborough, lo- cal historian and an advisory member of the national Civil War Centennial commission, points out that the old Abilene Masonic Cemetery is the burial place for a wife of a famous Civil War-Texas gubernatorial figure, the late Gov. F. R. Lub- bock. Mrs. Lubbock was a sister of Barbara Scott Wise i mother of JUniis and John Wisei and of Nannie F. Browne and is buried in the Wise family plot beside the graves of her sisters. Gov. Lubbock was chief of (he Texas government when the Civil War began and he served in the post until 1863 when he retired to go have a more active role in the fighting. Mrs. Scarborough has, inci- dentally, presented to the Mc- Murry Library n list of the Civil War soldiers buried in Taylor County, a list prepared pain- stakingly by Mrs. J. W. Cole as a VFW Auxiliary project in commemoration of the war's centennial. The list has 325 names. Most of them, naturally, were Con- federate soldiers. Rut. glancing through the list, see at least a notations of Grand Army of the Republic. Despile the late spring freeze De Leon is proceeding with plans for its annual Peach and Melon Festival Aug. 8. Melons it has. It has peaches, loo. You can buy them mil of a box marked "Packed in Califor- nia." The membership blank at the YMCA calls for various pieces of information about the pros- pective member. Bill Ellisor, V program secre- tary, says one youngster filled out his form completely. Under "Homo Address" he listed his. "Under "Bus. Address" he ex- plained, "My Daddy doesn't drive a bus. He drives a car." _______ 9908 XS OD S31VS A. A M I Tower Stymies Bid To SURVIVES ORDEAL Lifeguard Garrett Giberson, 20 is visited by fellow lifeguards Bill Knight, left, and Ray Scharf in an Asbury Park, N. J. hospital. Rescue efforts by the other lifeguards freed Giberson from suction of a drain in the city pool. Giberson was submerged from six to eight minutes. He was kept alive by the other lifeguards breathing air into his mouth. (AP Wircphoto) Faubus Has Lead Over Five Foes LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) businessman Winston Chand- Gov. Orval E. Faubus rolled up ajler of Little Rock, comfortable majority lead over Fulbright had votes early returns Chandler 40 Youthful Prisoners Stage Riot WASHINGTON (AP) Some 40 youthful inmates of a District of Columbia reformatory rioted Tuesday, brandishing sticks, clubs and a pickax in a brief demon- stration apparently touched off by Jlack Muslim protests. The riot, at the District of Co- umbia Youth Correction Center, nded after a wild 45 ut not before one of the demon- trators hit a Roman Catholic riest with the pickax. The Rev. Donald Shcely, the enter chaplain, was struck on the ead as he tried to quiet the men. e was not seriously injured. Donald Clemmer, director of 2-year-old institution, said the began while the 300 in- mates of the center awaited the all to their afternoon duties. It nded when Clemmer met with ve of the ringleaders and agreed i some of their demands. Clemmer said, a few minutes be- ore the afternoon work perioc vas to start, a group of inmate: marched out of a dormitory carry ng brooms and mop handles Vithin moments, the group grew to 15. They set up an uneven line o iiVC OpOOlientS 111 ItJIUliia iu j [rom Tuesday's Democratic pri-j Behind Faubus came former march on the lawn of the admin mary. but lacked the Sid McMath with votes, margin of his past three Dale Alford business- paians I man Vcrnon Whitten lawyer Bidding for an Coffelt 723 and farmer fifth term. Faubus had A- Cox m 'Otes 10 for the combined: Although Faubus showed soli ipposition returns from 564 was the first time 1'H8 precincts his fir5' canlPaiSi m 195 "The governor, controversial victory trend was not es- ure of the 1957 Little Rock snortly after the Polls gration crisis, needed a clear ma- closed. jorilv to avoid a runoff primary! from the Polls u [eel the vote would exceed the rec Scn.'j. William Fulbright ap'ord cast in the 1960 Demo pearcd headed for an easv Pnmary, when Faubus won lory over a conservative oppon- an unprecedented fourth term with 58 per cent of the vote. The Democratic nominee wil oppose Republican Willis Ricketts of Fayetteville in November. The fifth term was the over- riding issue in the campaign WEATHER U. DEl'AKTMEXT OF COMMERCE MKATIIKR Bl'lEKA ]P J01 which presented Faubus with the challenge of a career lieht that began when McMath, who CKNTHAl. AND frT 1949'52' Kail and Iml Wednesday anil i him 3 State appointment in 1949 Tinraiay. Wednesday 94-W2. _ NORTHWEST TEXAS nest-iy H5 In 75. Ilich Tliur! Wednesday to Ilio. More Riots' In Helsinki HKLSINKI, Finland   A crowd of more Ihari anti- Communists demonstrated Tues- day night in I be fifth straight night of public protesls against i the Hed-doniinad'd Eighth World Ymilh Festival here. Reinforced police squads routed the demonstrators with tear gas hombs. By midnight the Finnish Hich Clear to cloiiny i Scattered irlli. Wnrnicr far north Wednesday Bi north 98 SOUTH CKNTHAI. TEXAS: Clonr tn loiuly and lint Wednesday and Thursday, [igh Wednesdi'V TKMI-ERATrilKN rues. a.m. Tues. p.m. 75 2-00 and 7 n ml .nul 1 low for 2-Mtours ending 5 Murder-Suicide Verdict Returned LUBBOCK (AP-Peace Justice i George H. McCleskey returned a I verdict of murder-suicide Tuesday in the shooting deaths of a Lub bock businessman and bis wife. _ George E. Turner, 51, presideni 9jof West Texas Oxygen Co., and j his wife, Ella Mae, 46, died in 'ithe shooting Monday night at her Southwest Lubbock fashionable home. 13-Month Coma Ends for Girl, 16 PINE HUIFF. Ark. 10-year-old sleeping beauty woke up and uttered her first words in 13 months: "Hi, Daddy." An automobile tragedy that claimed the lives of her mother and aunt left pretty Linda Sue Calvcrt of Houston, Tex., coma June 18, Linda, her mother and in a aunt cnpltnl Nit ncri- port hospital in critical condition She suffered extensive brain dam age and a broken leg. After 24 days shs was moved to Tcxa Medical Center at Methodist Hos pital in Houston. Surgery rcmove( a blood clot from her brain, bu she remained unconscious. During the ordeal she was through tubes and opened he eyes several times, but neve spoke. She was returned to Pin< Bluff where friends and relative visited her regularly. For 1 months she gave no indication o recognizing anyone Since waking up July 24, sh  Senate Democrats, deeply split over a communications satellite bill, tried to patch up their feud and end a five-day filibuster Tuesday night, but their efforts were sty- mied by the objection of a lone Republican. A long day marked by a re- sounding clash between two top Democrats ended with the Seriate ecessing at p.m. until noon Wednesday. Sen. Mike Mansfield of Mon- ana, Democratic majority lead- er, tried to end the long wrangle >y proposing that the bill be sent o the Foreign Relations Commit- ee with the stipulation that it be aken up again on the floor next Tuesday. This would have had the effect of shelving the bill for a week. The Senate could have conducted other business in the meantime. Sen. Wayne Morse, D-Ore., and Sen. Estes Kefauver, D-Tenn., who led the stalling tactics against the space communica- tions bill, agreed to Mansfield1! proposal. However, the action required unanimous consent oi the Senate Sen. Barry Goldwater, R- Ariz., registered an objection. In a similar move a short time later, it was Sen. John G. Tower, R- Tex., who raised an objection. As in other Mansfield moves in- volving the filibuster, the com- promise proposal had the backing of Sen. Everett Dirksen, R-I11., and other GOP leaders. The communications bill, which would set up a private corpora- tion to handle space communica- tions such as those made possible by the new satellite, Telstar, has passed the House. Morse and oth- er liberal Democrats contend the government should control space communications. The second time the Mansfield compromise came their latest phase with a plan for clock sessions. settlement that Bunker put for ward in April. Reports from the Hague said the preliminary agreement in volved revisions of this plan to the effect that there would be a sym bolic raising of the Indonesian flag on Aug. 17 and that Indonesia would get full control from th United Nations next May 1. Dutch Ambassador J. H. Van voted for it. imagine he is a senior engineer with a doctor's degree fa mathe- matics and considerable experi-iHague jelestial mathematics." I the Netherlands government. Roijen arranged to fly to the Wednesday to report to in Tower's major- ity leader had proposed a 10-day shelving period for the bill. Some Republicans had voiced fears the 10-day interim would be used to bring up an administra- tion-supported farm bill and in- sisted the leadership should file a debate-limiting cloture petition to force a decision on the com- munications bill with around-the- Mansfield and Sen. Everett M. Dirksen, R-I1I.. the GOP minority leader, were armed with a clo- ture petition signed by more than i score of senators. The last time the unusual move succeeded was in 1927. Last May 14, when the Democratic major- ity was beaten 52 to 42 on a clo- ture move, only 20 Republicans At least four Democrats who op- See TOWER, Pg. 4-A, Col. 4 Nuclear Sub Plant Strike Ended After Costly Delay GROTON, Conn. (AP) Pro- workers at the Electric Boat division of General Dynam- ics Corp. approved by a 3-1 here brief moments vita Somy the wound station loses radarjMttflc. whether it needs a tax cut-was contact with the vehicle. At such Cannes- ports that a payoff was demanded immediately after the to get workers back on the job. vote was announced, and within Arthur Vars, an ousted official a hour plans were drawn up of one of the unions involved in jo resume work on the third shift. IDS KIM Tuesday, end- the strike, denied allegations that An shifts Wednesday would re- icii'infi a 13-day strike that had he had demanded or been offered according to previous work halted construction of nuclear sub- to support the settlement schedules, the company said. 1 lm.Anr.cal Uio W3ft IU1- ____1____... His testimony was un- vehicle is follow its normal, planned The workers are represented by the Metal Trades Council of New tra- jectory, without the stream of in- c  m ay the company said. days in lost time. After two contract proposals had Company and union leaders met again. flaw u..- been rejected by the union is established negotiations were moved to Washington nt the suggests oi "When this rejection signal was i the Federal Mediation and Con left said Morrison "false in was fed to dilation Service. Secretary of Ixibor Arthur J. Goldberg took a role in the talks, NEWS INDEX have advocated n permanent in- come tax reform with rates low- ercd by steps. The NAM spokes Morrison said the ill imatc re- day. Sen. John L. McClcllan, R-Ark., chairman of the Senate Investiga- tions subcommittee, had rec- formal hearings on re fl SECTION A Obitvorici......... Sporti Annulments....... Oil ntwt SICTION Mitoricll Womtn't nro..... Comtei TV firm comprised of 11 AFL-CIO unions. A company spokesman said new 3-year contract offer pro- vided a total money package of 25 cents an hour and an improved seniority provision. The seniority provision was con- sidered a major block to a settle- imcnt. The company said the contract calls for a wage boost of 7 cents in the first year, 7 cents in the second, and cents m third. Si-he company said fringe benefltt would amount to Mother I to t M tour, f   

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