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Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, July 19, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 19, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               WliTH OFFENSE TO OR FOES Wi YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT which rises. and aloof out of me prai-, the southwest earner between 'Dcubl. though M mortf than fcett from toe to head, looms large- andlinysteriotu story of this land. ;5lt nas looked down on a lot cf history and legend. It'was a landmark for Indi- ans, since it can be seen from 10 miles away, and it Is said signals once spoke from Jlat top. a signpost for explor- L jfagon trains and trail driv- _ li use, in steering a path across nothingness. It. has watched men dig for secret treasure in its sides, on the good ranch land at its feet, in the canyons stretching out for several miles. Lately it has seen some of these treasures discovered. None knows who named Dou- ble Mountain. Tradition has it the fellow who did came from die north, and that is likely. From the north the mountain seems "double." Viewed from the south, a dent in the west peak gives it a triple look. The east peak is on the ranch owned by Sam Baugh, rancher and football great, and the west peak is part of the Smith ranch. Exploring Double Mountain has for generations been a part ot the growing up process for youngsters of this area. It's not difficult to ascend if you nave plenty of wind. It's not descend if you ate sure-footed. Digging for the secrets in and about Double Mountain has been a longtime occupation for many. jists have dug for secrets of the ages and have had some success. Less suc- cessful, as far as we know, have been the gold seekers who have dug through the years for the riches rumors say are buried in and near the moun- tain. But now a new, a different treasure hunt is under way. Riches, in the form of oil, are being found. Out in the Fisher County can- yons which ramble off to the southwest of Double Mountain, canyons which seemed hardly worth nothering with, oil has been found in the Noodle Creek formation. Other oil fjnds have been reg- istered early in the land around the famous hills, but this new one is the most significant in this part of the country in some time, says Railroad Commis- sion District Supervisor Fred Osborne of Abilene. As of the first of this week, the official count was 55 pro- ducing wells finished in the new field since the discovery Feb. 4, 1961. These wells, from 3.7M to feet deep, have potentialed as high as 325 bar- rels, the RRC engineers say. New has failed to make the 84 prorated barrels. The new oil field is appropri- ately named "Rough Draw." (It's so rough in spots that one oil company spent on a road, to a drilling site.) far as it is now defined, "Rough Draw field lies in "County, reaching north- tne Kent Stonewall- corner, within eight so of the twin hill. t's close enough lot the mountain to look down and -watch this new search for its-secrets, toe successful hunt the old gold-hunt- Imaglned. r AND WHAT SUPERVISES tart feat article a By THOMAS J. STONE LIMA, Peru troops fired submachine gun bursts into ie air and used tear gas Wednes- ay, night to break up a crowd of 'eruvians demonstrating against military takeover of the civilian ;overnment. No injuries were re- orted. Canadian Doctors Concede Key Point in Med Program JULY 19, W2-THIBTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS rplanet Shot PLANNED PATH OF MARINER I This chart shows the position of the Mariner I spacecraft during a planned journey to .willnh miles of the planet 446-pound craft slated to be launched from Cape Canav- (AP Wirephoto) ________________ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) An interplanetary spaceship named Mariner 1 is scheduled for launching Sat- urday on a journey to the vicinity of the planet Venus. If successful, the intricate Spacecraft will 000 miles of Venus in early No. vember and sensitive instru- ments will probe secrets of the cloud-veiled planet. Before Mariner 1 covers the million miles to Venus, Mariner 2 scheduled for launching within six weeks, is to be following the same course through silent space. Purpose of the double launching is to gather as much data a? possible in the six-week period when Venus is in a fa- vorable position. It will be an- other 19 months before Earth and Venus again will be in rel- ative positions, in their or- bits about the sun, for another shot. US. scientists anticipate Russia will launch a vehicle toward Venus in the present period. The Russians launched flw only previous Venus probe, but its radio equipment fail- ed long before it reached the vicinity of Venus. They esti- mated it passed within miles of toe bright planet and went into orbit around the sun as Mariners 1 and 2 are expected to do. An Atlas-Agena B rocket will start the 446-pound Mari- ner 1 on its space voyage. Us- ing the same technique which enabled Ranger 4 to hit the moon earlier this year, the Agenda B will settle into a so- called "parking orbit" 115 miles above Earth at a speed of miles an hour. When the Agena B is in proper posi- tion for a Venus trajectory, its engine will accelerate to Earth escape speed of miles an hour and kick the space- craft free. A complex system of Earth and sun sensors, gyroscopes and gas jets win keep Man- ner on course and in the prop- er attitude so its instruments can radio data back to earth and its solar pwels gather the sun's rays for' battery power. The main tracking station at the National Aeronautics, and Space Administration's jet propulsion laboratory facility at GokWone, Calif., will, issue necessary radio commands to alter trajectory when neces- sary. About eight days after launching, when Mariner 1 is more than one million miles from Earth, Goldstone will send a signal to fire an en- gine in the spacecraft Ibis midcourse engince can pro- duce 90 pounds of thrust for up to 43 seconds and will pro- vide the big boost needed to jockey the vehicle onto the Venus fly-by path. Mariner 1 resembles a giant Insect with its solar cell pad- dta to a Oft Arrayed IWoot central body aw cmtanwnt twM tors, fuel bob and entitle experiments. an to collect to if tflrnl II nt two win solely on riodwheDMartisrHrtaJSl past at more tfctn MW mfles an how. The iiyutamtt are a microwave ter to study compOiittOB offlW and surface perahire and an infrared diometer to record, tures in me Although Venus is ML closest planetary neighbor, 1 Ue is known about jt the surfaee is masked by Peru Takeover Results in Clash S-A The demonstrators, including teen-agers, scattered' down' side streets when the soldiers brought their weapons into play on San Martin Plara, -in They smashed .the front, of a book- store just off the plaza and set ah 'automobile afire. It was the second outbreak since the removal of 72-year-old President Manuel Prado from his palace early Wednesday morning. Police used water .cannon and gunfire' to break up 'an afternoon demonstration. Three stone-throw- SASKWTOO, Sask. (AP) askatchewaiv's striking doctors ave in Wednesday on one key Mint in their holdout against the rovince's compulsory ogram. But they remained firm their -demands for important banges before returning to nor- mal practice. Dr. H. D. Daigleish, president the Saskatchewan College of Physicians and told the ruling Socialist. party's, conven-. tion the-doctors have decided to drop their demand "that the' gov- medicare eminent suspend the njedical in- surance act. In the original stand, the- doc- tors refused to talk over .a. pos- sible settlement with the govern- ment unless the plan was sus- pended first. MERKEL RAIN TOPS Lightning Sets Blaze Violent weather made another pass at the Abilene area Wed- esday as lighting struck a filled with to 700 bales of hay1 and oats on the Clarence Thorn-; on place nine miles west of Abi- ene. Merkel and points near As- ermont and Retail reported ver an inch Of rain Wednesday. The barn and its contents were estroycd in the fire caused by ie lightning bolt about noon. Thornton, who lives on Rt. 3, said e heard a loud clap of thunder ind looked out to see the barn up in flames, No rain ac- ompanied the electrical display. The owner said his loss would about and that bales of hay stored nearby were 2.55 saved from damage. Units from Dyesi AFB and the ibilene Fire Department an-fall wered the call. Joe Lockhart, Ab ilene district fire chief, said the eluded ire was extinguished in about 15 minutes, but that firemen remain- ed at the scene for about three nurs to prevent a flare-up. The Weather Bureau at the Mu- nicipal Airport reported a trace of nin a and 3 p.m. Dyesi AFB also reported a trace. In toe area, light to moderate ainfatt was reported at widely Mattered points. Largest rainfall was at Merkel with 1.41 inches. Three south of Aspermont .41 todM ftV. Sardto, Mar Re- WtstbfMk racwdad ,W of M irfth Oohirttb Ctty report- Ml .M, City and Putnam had MmNrt M M ered afternoon and evening thun- dershbwers, Precipitation .dumped by the light to extremely heavy rains dur- ng the early part of the week has filled one of Abilene's three supplying the city with water and las brought water levels up oh the other two. Lake Fort Phantom Hill was up to the spillway and storing 24 bil ion gallons of water. Lake, Abi- lene has risen .5 of a foot and now contains 2.270 billion gallons of water. It is 2.5 feet below the spill- way level. No change was report- While Dalgleish's statement ap- eared to be a step toward a set ement, a court dispute over the rogram came to a close in Re- ina, with the judge reserving udgement. the court action, heard by ustice D. C.. Disbery, three sup- wters of the doctors sought an iterim injunction against the pro- ncial commission supervising program until the medicare ct itself could be tested in the ourts. In his address to the Socialist onvention, Dr. Daigleish said the octprs still feel the best solution to suspend the program but he aid the college decided to shift s stand in an attempt to settle ie issues He proposed that the act be hanged at a special session of he legislature, but said, the mehdments must first be greed upon by the college and le government. Doctors would resume riorrrial ractice after passage of the mendments, the college presi- eht said. Premier Woodrow lakes loyd's government earlier igreed to modify the program, it said doctors should return to their practices first. Doctors withdrew normal serv- ce .when, the government started compulsory medical care in- Urarice plan 18 days ago. The plan covers everyone in sskatchewan Province and is fi- anced by single persons and amily assessments of and nd sewer partments, Lake Kirby contains billion gallons of water, he said. Late reports of Tuesday's rain- continued to come in to the newspaper office Wednesday. In- in the list were Bellinger .08, Blackwell, .84; and Clyde .20 WHERE IT RAINED ABILENE Municipal Airport Truce Total for Year 1J.57 Normal for Year 13.18 DYESS AFB........... Trace ASI'ERMCNT I Miles South............. 1.41 Ro- COLORADO CITY M KNOX cm................ MERKEL................... 1.41 ROTAN................ II M8es ng students were reported wound- ed. The demonstration Wednesday night came after the new military unta announced through its chief, army Gen. Ricardo Perez Godoy, t had no "present or future po- itical ambition" and that new elections would be held next June a'Curb power back to civilian eaders by July 28, 1963. The military leaders remove! Prado after he refused to nullify residential elections held June .0. Prado had only two weeks to serve in his term. Hie armed forces took control in an atmosphere charged with ension and the threat of continu- ing violence. Tense booing and some in he square before the govern- nent palace as; the junta swore tself and its military cabinet Into ffice, hours after the predawn akeover. Police manned' water- annon trucks and others movec n on the crowd to hold back the Jireat of violent demonstrations. Even after the new military government left the palace in the de Armas, crowds milte about and armored cars remained there on the alert. Most of the crowd seemed angry at the events but there were some cries of "Vi a, on its fringes. Police clashed sporadically with small groups of students, club- iing the demonstrators on backs nd heads with rubber trun cheons. Near San Marcos Univer ity, police fired tear gas bombs o break up a student crowd run- ning down the Peruvian flag to half staff. Threats of a strike by the Con- ederation of Labor, representing 5 per cent of the nation's labor orce, added to the tension. (The coup .brought immediate lemisphere repercussions. The Jnited States announced suspen- sion of diplomatic relations with and other nations followed rovinces' 700 doctors closed their ffices In protest of the plan, say- ing it would lead to government control over medicine. Supporters f the doctors' objections stemmed rom concern over their income. Don't leave Without Utting Us Pvnt IMM m wwtton An awumglalW ftftn In ywr yard N liivMrnMI tH tMfl j wi> Inofmif wl (it yww hi Mf tKom In Mfvt) erf 01 34271 TIN LIZZIE BELLES Dressed in clothes styled for the early autwnobfle in the Wednesday's opening Snyder Rod eo parade are Brandon Tubb, left, daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. Dub Tubb, and Vonee Reneau, daughter of Sir; and Mrs. Bob R. Reneau, all of Snyder. Story on Pg: 3-A. (Staff Photo by Jimmy Parsons) Court Says Michigan's Senate Illegal LANSING, Mich. (API-Michi- gan's Supreme Court declared the state Senate illegal Wednesday and ordered the Michigan Legis- lature to reapportibn the Senate. In a 4-3 decision, the tribunal called off the Aug. 7 primary for _______ _ the Senate and directed that a re- 40 members of the Abilene branch Humane Society thai think Postmen Unhappy About Dog Menace A group of Abilene postmen, ment ihat the judge cant M many bearing scars from encount- under rs with ill-tempered ap- suit. new The United Alliance for States halted Progress aid, districting plan be completed by Aug. 20. If the legislature fails to reach nuiwiibc nugieaa it. which has been running to about agreement by that deadline, the 75 million annually.) The armed forces chiefs moved large basis. Senate will be elected on an at- suddenly at the height of a crisis touched off by the June 10 presi- dential elections in which the mil- The vote followed along party lines, with four Democratic jus- tices in the majority and three itary's long-time political foe, re- Republicans dissenting. form-minded Victor Raul Haya de la Torre, ran first. WEATHER ealed Wednesday afternoon for woman told me this morning: lly the City Council to "take the dog is loose today; noons, monkey off our back" in the en- so watch another maUmaa orcement of city dog ordinances, related. After discussing the dog prob- And the Humane Society the National Assn. of Letter of the dogs than they do about Carriers voted to schedule an ap- humans." remarked Rsyraood learance before the council at its shields, a dog bite victim who uly 26 meeting. has had to take the rabies The postmen gathered in the series, deserted mail room of the federal wilding to let off steam and heap Several GOP legislators had in- dicated earlier they might seek to impeach the entire Supreme Court If it ordered an at-large election. Wednesday's decision in six different written opinions was the climax of a legal battle that began more than two years ago. In 1WO, Michigan AFL-CIO pres- ident August Scholle filed a suit complaining that the wide popu- lation disparity between districts violated the equal protectica clause of the U.S. Constitution. Some Senate districts up to 1J the population of The state court had decided Ucr that reapporUoomeirt political Issue oat wdtr Jttrif _J kMiaHtaMMi MMJMI MMM MB OLICE, JUDGE RAPPED em for more than ah hour, some Negligent postal "There are some people in criticism on a number of groups contacted by a reporter after and individuals (which later de- postmen's meetmi, said ht feH ended including: ordered bis dofcatcben to Police "1 don't see why we up enforcement ef Ike should have to file the complaint OUOWUf against the owner of the vicious carriers before the cMocil. asserted carrier Jim Dar- ty. "Why don't the police enforce major burden he law? We pay their salaries to upon tot catchers. do that." Corporation Court Judge Don Wilson "Judge Wilson fbes then suspends the fine, said another poaimai. The city attorney the state- NEWS INDEX Chief of Police Warren Dodson, Dodaon 
                            

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