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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, July 18, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 18, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FOES WE SKETCH YOUR wor 3AV 9908X8 03 ABILENE, TBXAS, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Civil ttfaln rattafni in fton Bi advance of, this reoccupa- t borne and business there from Gordon this "offi- mo" least, U I." It- Id field -to civilians back hone on 'care and treatntent of the returnees. :It reads, in large part, thusly; following is issued in solemn warning to friends and relatives, neighbors and- ac-' qualntances of (the returning In making preparations Joyously to welcome him back Into society, you must make cer- tain allowances ..-In a word, be must be handled with care. "3, Show no alarm if he pre- fers to wear short and carry a briefcase of papers don't ridicule him if he trades his car for a, convert- ible', and Army steel helmet, then chops the windshield off the convertible, dons the helmet and-says he is merely being tactical.' Keep cool when he pours gravy on his dessert.... stuff his pockets with'leftovers from the dinner- table. "4. Be tolerant when he pre- fers an air mattress and sleep- ing bag to his comfortable bed. When answering the telephone be may say 'WHY instead of hello and 'WHEN AND instead of goodby. In a relatively short time he can be taught to speak English again. Never ask .boys afile to make more rank than he -as this can easily throw him into a vio- lent fit. He witt-go insane if the word is mention- ed. He may suddenly come to a rigid position of attention and march about yelling 'Hut, Hoop, Haree, and then collapse into a state of melan- choly. Unless otherwise direct- ed by a physician, don't men- tion the Democratic Party for at least six months after re- lease from active duty. "5. Do not at any time ask him if he has, or ever tried, to lave any money while in the service. This may put him in a State of shock for several days during which he will blubber about Soldiers' Deposits, Taxi Fares, Statement of Charges, Forfeitures, Income Taxes and, yes, even Inflated Beer Prices. "6. Do not turn your head in doubt or disgust when he re- lates of his many adventures as world traveler for he has had many such adventures at Myrtle Beach, the Post The- atre and on many' maneuvers in the Fort Gordon woods and in Aggressita. These experi- ences share the responsibility for the aged appearance and of twitching. "7. Never blow a whistle near him or he may jump out the nearest window for fear of be- ing late for a formation. Humor him if he should, in his first week at home, ask for a pass, where the sign-out book is, and if there is a curfew in town. "B. From the first few weeks he is at home until he is again house-broken, be especially Watchful when he is around women, particulary the very young and .beautiful. After months of seeing beautiful wom- en wooed and won by handsome men in the movies he may think he is a master of the in mind that be- neath hto Georgia tan there beau a heart of goW-about.the only thing of value he has left, flneat him with kindness and tolerance and, the Almighty willing, you may rehabilitate Hit hollow shell of the proud civilian you once knew." directions to civHinn mint have some M nearly as we can the signature ft Meyers Jr." ft by htm M "14. i to md. "Frank W. ACWlJan." Rains Continue In Abilene Area mulish in Abilene Tuesday they still were present in LIMA, Peru of Victor Raul Haya de la Torre, rent-runner in the June 10 presi- dential election, threw their sup- port Manuel presidency. Headquarters.of Haya's Popular Revolutionary Alliance, APRA, said it will back Odria in an ef- EASE Miss Jerri Cobb of Oklahoma City takes" her position as witness in shoes as she testified Tuesday before a House Space Subcommittee. Miss Cobb and Mrs. Janey Hart, right, wife of'Sen. Philip Hart, D. Mich., were among witnesses seeking women as astronauts in the U. S. space program. Story Pg. 9-A. (AP Wirephoto) Thundershowers began to di- but the area, with Coleman's .85 of an inch one of the largest reported. One station within the city, at 2718 S. 20th street, reported one nch of moisture Tuesday morn- ng, bringing the two-day total at hat point to five inches. At 682 E. N. 15th St., .90 of an nch was reported, while the feather Station at the Municipal Airport reported .09 of an inch, rain brought total rain- all for the year to '13.57 inches, 45 of an inch above normal rain- all of 13.12 for the date. Widely scattered afternoon and vening thundershowers are fore- ast for .Wednesday and Thurs- day and maximum temperatures Eastland reported a trace of rain, but Lake Leon, 10 miles east, was reported up 3% inch, putting it slightly more than three feet from the Spillway. Texas Electric Company's Leon Power Plant Lake, five miles East of Eastland, wa.s reported overflow- ing. 2-Day Tues. Total ABILENE Municipal Airport ...09 1.38 Total for Year 13.57 Normal for Year 13.12 DYESS AFB ........02 .21 KIRBY LAKE .......20 both days are not expected above BLACKWELL he low 90's. High water barricades erected tonday afternoon in Abilene had >een removed by late Tuesday. In the area, rain ranging from two to three inches fell Tuesday it Nolan, Maryneal and Black- well. Lake Sweetwater rose sev- eral inches creeks. ASCS REPORT The fourth in a series of stories by Reporter-News Farm Editor Bob Cooke on the functions of a county committee In the federal farm page, Pg. 8-B._______ WHERE IT RAINED BALLINGER CLYDE COLEMAN COLORADO CITY EASTLAND GOREE HAMLIN HAWLEY...... LAKE SCARBOROUGH .90 1.10 2.25 .63 ..-.03 ...20 ...85 .52 1.24 Trace2.00 .70 .07 .10 from the flowing LORAINE 30 LOST CREEK MENARD RISING STAR' .20 ROBERT LEE .51 ROCKWOOD ROSCQE .04 TALPA VALERA .45 WESTBROOK .08 WINTERS 20 1.30 .45 3.05 1.45 1.00 4.20 1.75 1.90 FEWER FIREMEN New Rail Rules Slated Aug. 16 The nation's strike, but President Kennedy has ailroads said Tuesday they will the authority to invoke put Into effect Aug. 16 new work provisions of the Railway Labor ules, recommended by 'a presi- ential commission, which would Act and name make settlement lirhinatc jobs of firemen lions. Such action would bar employed en diesel locomotive's. Some o'her firemen also dent's action. working as second men in diesel ocomotlve cabs in freight yard in salaries and working conrii- ervice and pulling freight trains would keep their jobs. i The action was announced by the mediation board's efforts. Thejvifte M fit AitfT Ifi flattt 4kii Aniiridra E. Wolfe, chairman of the Aug. 16 date set by (he carriers carriers' joint bargaining commit- tee, only one day after the Na: ttoMl (railway) Mediation Board formally relinquished its efforts to the employers acted help reach a settlement in the long manpower economy dispute, There seemed little likelihood Dw into WoOot ptoTtTwto move. f the if- a board to recommenda- JFK Blasts Senate On Medicare Ex-General Gets Support in Peru night to Odria for been no Congress to decide the presidential issue. This would have opened the way for the mili- tary, to enter the picture. _ Prado was busy during the day Penis trying to form a new cabinet. Fernando Berckemeyer, Peru's retired ambassador to the United States who has been mentioned for the prime minister's post, postponed Berckemeyer said in Washing- ton that a shutdown in telephone communications with Lima bad prompted the postponement. AMBASSADOR TOLD WASHINGTON ort to end the political crisis a scheduled return from Washing- resulting from armed forces' op- ton. position to Haya. There was no immediate word onjhe military reaction to .the move. Earlier hi the day chiefs of the army, navy and air force called on the national electoral board'to annul the election. The electoral board met during the evening and 'announced after- ward that the final returns in he balloting showed none of the (residential candidates obtained one-third of the votes needed to win. Board President Jose Busta- mante said the official results will le turned over to Congress. Bust- atnante made no reference to the military's annulment request. Outgoing President'Manuel Pra- do rejected a similar.demand "by he military Monday night. This ed to the resignation of. Prime Minister Carlos Moreyra Paz Sol- lan and his cabinet. The mass resignations touched iff reports of a possible military akeover. Haya led a seven-man field, in- Juding Odria, in the election hilt ailed to obtain the required bne- hird of the total votes. Under the constitution, Congress must now choose a president from mong the three leading conten- Odria and Fernando Selaunde Terry, now head of the eftist Popular Action Party. The APRA said that in an ef- ort to "achieve national unity nd maintain the constitutional it will join forces with Jdria's rightist National Odriista Jnion in the congressional ballot- ng. Odria headed Peru's govern- ment from 1948 to 1956. If the electoral board had an- tulled the election, which includ- ed the selection of new deputies and senators, there would have ate killed 52 to Tuesday Presl' dent Kennedy's compromise plan dent Lyndon B. Jotam to gtf to help the elderly pay their has- the Senate back to work, pital and nursing care winging a prompt denunciation from the chief executive. Within an hour after the new much expectation of gettbtf jolting legislative the through .the House this administration, a grim-faced Ken- strong opposition in the Ways nedy appeared before newsmen to Means Committee there. Bat call the action ''a most serious defeat (or-every American fam- ily." ANATOLY F. DOBRYNIN t session with Kennedy He said he will offer toe plan again next' year and appealed to debate when Berlin Troops 'Not Negotiable1 iy their choice of members of Congress in the November elec- tions. The climactic months of pressure and dickering jy both sides, gave a psychologi- cal lift to members of Congress Kennedy reportedly told Soviet of the presidential office 55 min- Ambassador Anatoly F. Dobrynin Tuesday night that the .withdraw- al of Western troops from Berlin is not a'negotiable Issue. The President was said to have stressed a. new. Western ation on Berlin in an unusual talk with Dobrynin which lasted near- ly an hour. The two conferred alone, with- out aides, in the President's of- fice. Dobrynin speaks English flu- ently. Secretary of State Dean Husk, who was at the White House for j'National Security Council meet-! ing, left without sitting in on the] talks. The Soviet envoy, called to the Two Men Killed In Bronte Crash Strikers Get Ultimatum WASHINGTON (AP) -Eastern Jr Lines reportedly handed its light engineers a 24-hour ulti- matum Tuesday to end their strike or face a company move to re- time operations without them. The company was said to have nformad the Flight Engineers In- ernational Association in Writing ate Tuesday that unless there is a settlement by 5 p.m. Wednes- !ay the airlines will go out and lire a new batch of engineers. The walkout has shut down the airline for 25 days. The company was reported to. tave outlined settlement terms to the engineers union in the ulti- matum. BRONTE (HNS) Two men were killed about p.m. Tues- day night 6 miles south of here on U. S. highway 277 in a grind- ng headon two-car collision. Killed were Aubrey Don Den- man, 22, Bronte and Fred C. Ohlenbusch, about 30, of Sweet- water. Penman was believed to be driving his 1959 Chevrolet south at he time of Ohienbusch's Euick. Denman was an oil field worker. WEATHER ;Strike for 60 days after the Presi- No strike by unions or change mllci) Parti warm with i ttiundf: Huh tiqns by the railroads is permitted for 30 days after abandonment of the earliest possible for apply. SOUTH CKNTRA cloudy M4'M new rules. Wolfe toM c Ceatherbeddmg that them to bankruptcy." Economy news conference "to end the U driving first ctaUM Railroad pr-tdent the AMO- el Americas RiflrMds. officiata to CUMbM wwk nta g. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE KEATHEE BUREAU (Wcllhcr Pue 9-A> ABILENE AND VICINITY IRUItu 40 and continued and AND NORTHEAST y and warm Wedim- lltred Partly TNurtday Twa. eve of Algerian Day. July S. tie warned that if Independence UN wtlaya White-House at 6'p.m., strode out utes later without commenting to reporters. Presidential Press Pierre Sahnger said' 'Kainedy wow to s Social-Security brought up the major isslies of approach w health' care 'for the Berlin, disarmament, nuclear aged. Only five to block other Kennedy proposals. It came on top of defeat of Kennedy's farm and urban affairs department proposals, alteration of some key tax recommendation; and lack of action oh such prime administration bills as aid' to education. Twenty-one of them 31 He- death testing and Laos. Salinger said he had nothing more to say on the private meet- ing. It was learned that the Presi- dent called Dobrynin his first talk of substance with the ary. Russian envoy with the aim of mpressing on Moscow his per- sonal backing for the U.S. views which have been previously'Com- municated to the Kremlin through diplomatic and public channels. the collision northbound with 1958 New Crisis In Algeria ALGIERS rebels n Western Algeria demanded the resignation Tuesday of Premier Ben Youssef Ben Khedda and his moderate government. The of dissi- dent Deputy Premier Ahmed.Ben Bella-made a veiled threat to use force if Ben Khedda failed to of the wreck a few minutes after it occurred, said the .collision happened on a straight stretch of highway. Funeral arrangements are pend- ing at Clift Funeral Home of Bronte. Denman's survivors include his parents Mr. and Mrs. A. Z. Den- man of Bronte; two brothers, Lanny and David of the home; one sister, Jeaiina Kay of the home. Surviving Ohlenbusch are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Ohlenbusch of Sweetwater, step down. Mo- Former Deputy. Premier rl "wMnwdiy" Viw hammed Khider told a news con- tf'S. ference at rebel headquarters in regime were' '100, group of usurpers George Morgan of Minter Ln., Abilene, who arrived on the scene vote. But this was shouted down 21 Demos GO Pin Vote WASHINGTON Sen- ft was over It took year issue. Administration hopes practfcajf "m3S Randolph, D-W.Va., annouoced was voting against the provision onto the pending might endanger the entire welfare measure. Some of the programs extended by that bill' expired June- 3K notably federal grants for on-' employed parents and dependent. children, The wortC increase the federal share monthly checks for the co-sponsored the 43 Democrats in trying to save it. It was fte first time all loo members were on hand for a vote sines the Senate killed Kennedy's urban affairs proposal last Febru- leries packed and standing room in the rear of the Senate chamber crowded With employes of sena- were on hand. A last-ditch Kennedy plan was made on a motion to reconsider the tabling iy, voice vote. The hubbub was so great after! NEWS INDEX SECTION A Radio-TV 7 TV Scout 7 Amuiemtnti 9: Oil itm..............10 SECTION B 2 Women's MWS 3 Comici 4 Farm of gavel pounding by Vice Prest- of the pbm had hopes of pushing it through the Senate although they felt Senate passage would the proposal a stronger blind and disabled write new provisions to tate families on relief rolls. Sen. John Tower A-Ta., with the tion. Sen. Ralph Yarnoroi D-Tex., voted against tabling. Wafer Over Phantom Spillway Water went over the Lake Fort Phantom HOI spillway Tuesday Technically, what the Senate did was to approve a motion by Sen. Robert S. Kerr, D-Okla., to table and thus kill an amendment by Sen. Clinton P. Anderson, D- N.M., that would have tied the Kennedy plan; to a House-passed public welfare bill. The roll call was tolled off in by .2 of a foot as water impound- a tense of two ed by the reservoir was pushed weeks of the gal-to more than 24 billion gallons by rains mis week. Bill Weems, director of the wa. ter and sewer department, report- tors. Some house members also 1Lake Kirby ene water levels .were. Hearing then- respective spillways. Weems said that unless smt rain fell he did not believe water over the spillway wouM get any deeepr. 7' At Lake Kirby, .8 of an inch of rain fell after Tuesday moraim, although the water level was aat raised. It remained 1.4 feet the spillway, Weans said. lake, with a capacity of 18 gallons, contains 2.S water. Lake Abilene's level three feet below the spillway, 1 of a foot from Monday's read- ing. Lake AWene, with a capacity of 3.2 billion gallons, has U lion gallons. Texas Candidates Cross Swords at Labor Session By CHARLES GREEN SAN ANTONIO Cox for endorsement but ail indicated and John Connally crossed swords jt would be welcome. COPE wffl in a unique political session be- fore organized labor Tuesday to Thursday. make its decision in a cloied Mi- get the governor's campaign off to a flying start. Cox, Republican nominee til raivo A ciurtt iicnuuuai id, BUI _ i Tlemcen that Ben Khedda and his governor, and Connally, his Dem- ton Smith (D) and Bill Hayes 'w for lieutenant governor; Wi er Carr (D) and T. E. Kennedy ocratlc opponent, spoke before a for attorney Committee on Political Education CKI1IIC TTCIW O KIVUL> VI MOUIMV1O at. Sitfl --------------or whose resignation would be r- in- Jtojte.. XTLtX Barry, PooJ'. telligent decision that would help" solve Algeria's political crisis. Khider, top aide of Bella, And Connally, In a was the tint miniiter to break sldered by some labor leaders to with Ben Khedda when the dls- be a turnabout from earlier "You pute came Into the open on the menu, atked for the active sop- you port of COPE to UM NovanUr everylhtot I (eneral ehctlon. mMttoi i None of the Republicans asked try Cox The other candidates Pres- opponent. "You You and I CM Bra Austto, and both e profrm"   

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