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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 11, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 11, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH QFFENSE TO FftlENOS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLf YEAR, NO. 25 PAGE ONE I Voimg Eddie Jones'first Wrth- n day, on July 5, prompted liUs from eight states 'to the. fund' which for hto mother the nursing care the son of Sharon Jones, 14-year-old Abflene who has been unconscious aince she was injured in a wreck in December I960. She must have constant at- tention and, after insurance expired and family savings were exhausted, some friends and strangers started in March 1961 the Sharon Jones Fund at Citirens National Bank, a vol- unteer" effort to provide that care. Pre-birroday pictures and n ttory on Eddie, who was born during his mother's unconscious- ness, were published in this newspaper on July 1. The As- sociated Press spread the ac- count of the truth-is-stranger- than-fiction drama. And money gifts for Sharon's attention have been coming in steadily since to Citizens Bank. Mary Ann Barker, who tabu- lates the fund at the bank, said that from Monday, July 2 through Monday, July 9, the gifts totaled That is equal to from five to six weeks nursing bills, calcu- lates: Don Taylor, who with Gary Archer is co-custodian of the fund. Most of the gifts are from Texas. But the envelopes have carried, too, postmarks of towns and cities in Kansas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Florida, Illinois and New Mexico. Bob Murdoch, the East Texas informant with West Texas ties an H-SU ex and his wife's parents are of notes that his home town Of Tyler has some apt 'THe federal district attorney who serves Tyler is Mr. Justice Tyler's highly successful foot- ball coach, Floyd Wagstaff, lives on Easy Street And an official of Internal Revenue Service, the head of IRS delinquent accounts di- vision, was in Tyler the other day. His name is Axe (Herbert In this vacation season Mur- doch, and his wife and their chil- dren, Dianne, 8, and Janet, 13, made a tour of Texas. By night they stayed in mo- tels, by morning the children were able to have daily their favorite food, pancakes, and by day they crammed in the his- torical and tourist wonders of the state. The girls were shown the Hill Country, the Missions, the Ala- mo, the San Jacicto battlefield and monument. Back home the Murdochs re- viewed the trip. "Of all the things yon saw and did, what did you enjoy Father asked Dianne. she declared without hesitation. Texana cannot compete with pancakes. One particular tourist de- serves a salute. G.A. Lloyd of 2400 Ave. I Snyder, has just completed a tour of Texas, alone, in his 1950 model car. No trouble at all. Mr. Lloyd will be 84 on Aug. 11. A retired Houston postal worker, he does a good bit of traveling. His hobby is geneal- ogy and he goes here and there tracing family history. This lat- est trip took him from Coke County to Waco, to Austin, to Houston and round and about. He has learned one new trick to make driving easier, say two Uoyd grandchildren, Mrs. Ho- mer Hutto Jr. and Delbert Lloyd the freeways and expressways and thus has tntiacceu and rural roads si- I to himself. NEWS INDEX Soviets Propose New Berlin Force By STANLEy JOHNSON of West Berlin and win a freer MOSCOW Premier Khrushchev made another effort .0 pry the Americans, British and French out of West Berlin Tues- day. He proposed to replace them bristled with anti-American state- 298 B96t OT SVX3I TWO SECTIONS IHi New Satellite Picked I Up in France, Great Britain (API-Government and private enterprise teamed up Tuesday to put an amazing com- munications satellite into orbit, From hundreds of miles above the FLAG FROM OUTER SPACE The first broadcast from Telstar, a communica- earth, it inaugurated the era of in- tions satellite launched early Tuesday frpm Cape Canaveral, Fla., brought this ternattonai ocean-spanning tetevH image of the American flag in relay live television broadcast from Telstar in sion. outer space. (AP Wirephoto) with troops of Norway and Den- mark, or Holland and Belgium, and Communist contingents from Czechoslovakia and Poland all under the U.N. flag. The proposal was made .to ah accompaniment of claims of the most powerful weapons in the world, including antimissile mis- siles, and threats of .more Soviet nuclear tests. It met a prompt rejection in Washington and London. Qualified American officials said the idea was not even new to al- ready had. been suggested by Rus- sia and ruled out by the West in Secretary of State Dean Rusk's irivate talks with Soviet .diplo- mats. A British Foreign Office said replacement of British and French that spokesman American, roops was not negotiable. It appeared, however, Khrushchev hoped to apply new iressure to get the, garrisons of he three big Western nations out Southern Baptist Convention Leader Due Here Aug. 3 Aug. 3. Announcement :'of the appear- Irst Baptist Church in Oklahoma well McQueen at a Brotherhood Church. (Story on Pg. 2-A) Dr. Hobbs, who was recently re- Queen said. hand for the Communists. His speech to delegates from 118 countries at the World Peace Congress in the Kremlin ments and warnings of catastro- phe. "The hotbed of war danger in the heart of Europe (Berlin) is becoming ever more PW hard onthe Seels of press re- bo aeclareC1 But he set no dead-ports of-Kbrusachev's-rocket-srat- 1. _ fnnnnh frt thd "PaOPO fVm. lines for a Berlin settlement as he has done before. Glancing solemnly over his glasses at his audience hi the red and gold hall, he declared the So- viet Union has developed a mis- sile to knock down This was the first such claim, but Western military experts ,doubt that Soviet scientists have such a weapon ready to shoot. He denounced as a challenge to mankind the current series of American tests in the Pacific, in- cluding the high-altitude hydrogen shot Monday, and said these had made further improvement of So- viet weapons an unavoidable ne- cessity. This was-a reiteration of threats of a new series of Soviet nuclear tests. Khrushchev's claims to the world's most powerful weapons were in these words, "Let's be perfect weapons that no other power possesses." Earlier Khrushchev said, "From the point of view of reality if the matter were examined ob- Dr. Hershell Hobbs of Oklahoma jectively, taking into account that City, Okla., president of the South-the Soviet Union was forced to era Baptist Convention, will be develop in the last few years nu- [uest speaker for a District 17 clear weapons of and more Baptist Brotherhood rally here on megatons, intercontinental rockets and the global rocket which is practically impervious to defense, anee o'f Dr. Hobbs, pastor of the and an antimissile missile, it will be seen that the ruling circles of City, was made Tuesday night by the United States, who do not district Brotherhood president Lo- have the same powerful military weapons, have no reason at all meeting at the First Baptist to say that the-balance of strength has changed in their favor." Toward the end of Khrushchev's elected to head the Southern Bap- 2-hour, 25-minute speech, some 1st Convention, will speak in the of the delegates were dozing in chapel-auditorium on the Hardin-their bright red seats, but most Simmons University campus, Me- of them applauded vigorously whenever he denounced the West. U.S. Rejects Russian Plan For Berlin By LEWIS GULICK WASHINGTON Unit- ed States sharply and publicly re- Co.'s Bell Laboratories, and the jected Tuesday a new Berlin pro- posal by Soviet Premier Khrush- chev and denounced as "hypocri- sy" his complaint against U.S. atomic tests. State Department press officer Lincoln White issued the U.S. re- in Maine. It shot out into space tliiig speech to the "Peace Con. gress" now meeting in Moscow. Khrushchev proposed that Bel- gian and Dutch, or Norwegian and Danish, troops, plus Communist Polish and Czechoslovakian units, replace the present American, British and French garrisons in West Berlin. White disclosed that the United States, in Secretary of State Dean Rusk's private conversations with the Soviets, had already turned down a Soviet suggestion .that the smaller North Atlantic Treaty Or- ganization and Warsaw Pact pow- ers replace the Western Big Three in Communist-surrounded West Berlin. Western strategists regard the continued military presence of the big powers in West Berlin as vital to the life of that city under Red pressure. They feel past Khrush- frank about it-we have the most chev proposals-including making West Berlin a "free city" and sub- stituting a U.N. presence for the Western garrisons are aimed at eventual Communist control. White said: "Chairman Khrushchev's state- ment appears to be one of the variants of Soviet proposals pre- viously put forward designed to reduce or eliminate the position of the three Western powers in West Berlin. "For example, in the aide-mem- Sire from the Soviet Union to the United States of June 4, 1961 (aft- er Khrushchev's Vienna meeting with President the So- viet government proposed the in- troduction of token Soviet troop contingents into West Berlin. "It has already been indicated to the Soviets that the particular variant mentioned by Chairman Khrushchev today does not pro See BERLIN, Pg. 2-A, Col. 2 At the same time that the Tel- star satellite -was relaying vivid television into American homes, the pictures were picked up in France and Great Britain, many days ahead of the scheduled be- ginning of international television transmission. The first picture from outer space showed 'the American ,flag> rippling strongly in a to' the tune of the American National Anthem. The satellite was sent aloft from Cape Canaveral, Fla., well before dawn. It was developed by the American Telephone Telegraph company paid the government's National Aeronautics and Space Administration million to launch and track it. The picture and sound left the earth at Andover, a small town WHAT USE. cut-away drawing to hit the Telstar astjt whirled several .hundred miles "above the earth, The satellite, its intricate parts functioning smoothly, mag- nified the signal 10 billion times, then switched the frequency and sent the picture and the sound back down to Andover and onto the nation's television networks. This remarkable demonstration on the part of the space switch- board was preceded by the first degree temperature Tuesday, it tornado lasted a wide area he- telephone communications relayed by way of outer space. Participat- ing were Frederick R. Kappel, board chairman of and Vice President Lyndon B. John- on. "Good Kappel began his conversation from Andover, as dieted. was 102 in Sweetwater and 103 in Snyder, Seymour and San Angelo. It was just plain hot all over, the hottest of the year. Weathermen expect it to be just as hot Wednesday, probably hot- ter in Abilene with 100-pliis nre- casually as he might have ad- dressed a phone call across town. He then identified himsglf and asked, "How do you hear "You're coming through nice- was the conversationally re- ply from the vice president in Washington. There followed an exchange of chitchat during which Johnson re- marked: "This achievement is an- other first in the conquest space." nnrsday High Wednesday 97-103. NORTHWEST TEXAS Clew to cloudy Wednesday and Thursday. Scattered Me Uiundcrshovren Panhandle and plains Not as warm northern Pa uraday. HUti Wednesday. 98-104. SOUTHWEST TEXAS Clear to cloudy and hot Wednesday, and Thursday. Sigh Wednesday 96404. Tnei. a. 82 to...... 78 77 75 :RATUKES Millions of American viewers CTOTHAI, AND NOOTBEAI saw their flag waving in the breeze as clearly as though it had been transmitted across town by their local television station in- stead of traversing .the vast; reaches of space. Later came word of .the extra dividend received by French and, British television viewers. A for- mal exchange of 12-mtnute televi-: sion programs between the United States and first live intercontinental television broad- planned in a week or so. However, Teistar ground sta- tions in Britain and France were scanning the sky for signals from the inaugural cast American broad- STORMS FOLLOW HEAT BY ILLNESS Hot? It's Gonna Get Hotter Today Abilenians sweltered in 99- Violent thunderstorms were spawned Texas Tuesday night by the heat wave. WEATHER tween Crane and San Angelo. The reported twister destroyed a trailer house at the Crane water station in northwest Crane County. There were no injuries reported. Utility lines were knocked down around Crane aad McCamey. Big Spring reported an inch of rain from a thunderstorm there. Late Tuesday night the U.S. Weather Bureau said the storm activity was centered between Big Spring and San Angelo. Tuesday's 99 here was the hol- es. DEPARTMENT OF COMMEBCE WEATHER BUREAU (Wefllher I ABILENE AND Of miles) r tinned hot days 100 75. Map, Tare 3-A) Thursday. High Doth Wednesday night it 98 97 96 s-oo......... fi-oo S-M.......... 85............ 89 92.......... 94 High and low for 24-noun ending 9 p rn 99 and 73 High and low same date lut i-ear: 91 OTiset tonUM: Barometer readins at 9 p.m.: Humidity at 9 p.m. 35 per cent. High winds and an unconfirmed May 30. Shannon Teal, Weather to Bureau meteorologist, fatalistically knotty problem. rmh TtniMutav Htffh "Tr-iof rtuirtfrl wsiti'f cfanfl PrtlVmiigcmnOi' said, "That record won't stand very long. We're going to break it Wednesday." Last year's high was- 97 Aug. 4) and it hasn't hit 100 degrees officially since Sept. 15, 1960, he said. Hot weather Is becoming a daily happening. For instance Tuesday was the eighth straight day of 100 or higher at Sweety, ater. had the dubious distinction of having the highest reading, with 107 degrees. At least a dozen Laredo with 105. Engineer Selection Postponed Selection of aj .engineering firm to design the city's new sewage treatment plant will be held in abeyance until Commissioner Wi- ley Connally, now ill, can join ia the decision. It appears that the earliest Con- nally could attend a commission meeting, based upon his doctor's present estimate, would be July 16. Mayor C. H. Kinard met with Commissioners Truman, Kirk and George Kaerwer over coffee Tuesday informally and they test this year, topping the 98 of agreed they should wait for a full commission before settling the Commissioner Wiley "Coahalfy was hospitalized last week with pneumonia and failed to attend (on the Thursday session. His physician said Tuesday that Connaliy is progressing satisfac- torily, but he doubts that the ail- ing commissioner will be able to meet with the commission until next week's regular session. Commissioners have been un- able to reach agreement on Elsewhere in Texas, Presidio lection of an engineering firm for the million project for some weeks now. At one time, the vota for one firm was 2-2, a deadlock cities reported temperatures of 100 resuiting when Kirk decHned degrees, according to The Associ- vote. ated Press. Discussion of the selection hsa Wink reported 106, followed by not come up in a public since. Notice of Impact Permit iffiA, Try Given; 3rd Store Due Odessa liquor store owner John J. McCown apparently has ended weeks of speculation by running a legal notice in this issue of the Heporter-News that he will apply For a package store permit in Im- pact. And, in a second happening con- cerning Impact, the town's mayor, Dalits Perkins, revealed Tues- said he will await the outcome of day afternoon that he is convert- whether to issue the permit. Cown's package store has been completed and is ready to be stocked should the LCB official rule favorably on the C.C.H. ap- plication. The liquor permit application of Roy Jackson of San Angelo is (till on file with Stevenson, who has quo warranto proceedings against occupied liquor in the fl- Ing the dairy barn at the rear of the City of Impact before issuing Ma borne Into a package atore a permit. A end District Court also, Jury recently ruled In favor of circuit- Impact In the quo warrants hear- Mancw, "the application of C.C.H., bat the deeWan IM bean Inc., at which McCown appealed. 
                            

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