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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 3, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 3, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               Wni "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORUI iM WNJ) YEAR, NO. 17 PAGE ONE Them is today u elaborate social order, but the foundation on which the whole syi- trn. one laid down by our it the sewing club. It was the flngMt the local feminine w and it had a In ;an earlier chore never! werAnot tossed when the hole appeaaf Sewtog was hfitury it Is era of gamienU, Quilts had to be quilt- ed else there'd be cold feet next winter. Napkins had to be hemmed for napkins were made of cloth. There was tatting to a dresser set or a piano to embroider. The sewing club started when the girls (ell into the habit of fathering with friends to stitch and to sew until it was time to go start the biscuits. The sewing club survives, long In being, some lately formed. And some sewing clubs sew. Many of the clubs are un- named. For example, there's the one with Mmes. Caroline Godwin, Henry James, Charles Henning, John Ray, J. M. Davenport, Erie Sellers, Ross Jennings ST., Frank Murphy as members. "We do Mrs. Godwin gays. "And, yes, we do talk a lit- tie, We settle a lot of prob- The club is just "The Sewing Club." alsc have The Book Mrs. Godwin says.) Then there's another, "The Sewing Its members are Mmes. Guy Caldwell, Thomas Brownlee Sr., Harold Austin, Vic, Behrens, Price Campbell, Cecil Childers, Mac Davenport, Jeff Haynie. "No, we don't all sew all the MriyKBrownlee reports. "But we do sew... some" This "The Sewing Club" also entertains, dinner parties for husbands, parties for children who marry and the members "are now looking forward to parties for our grandchildren." Some dubs have names and organizations So-Sum, New Idea Sewing Club The New Idea can trace it- self back a half-century or so. (Present members are Mmes. E. T Compere, Walter Pope Sr., M. B. Hanks, H B. Stevens, Will Daniels, W. A. French, J. L. McDavid, Joe Williamson, R. A. Maddox Sr. Claude Gill, K. W. Douthit, Frank Wal- ker, Henry Sayles.) The New Idea-ers come right out and admit it. They don't sew. They used to. The club in earlier years had exhibits at the Fair. They might sew now if they wished, but they don't wish, The club has a distinction. It was pictured in Life Magazine. (When the magazine did a pic- true-story on the life of a so- ciety editor, the late Mrs. R. L. Faucett of this newpaper, the photographers went with Mrs. Faucett to a New Idea meeting.) Then there's the Quilt Club. (Members: Mmes. Carl Sellers, vy H Williams, Emmett Chan- dler, H. A. Pender, E. T. Com- pere, W. B. McDaniel, C. L. Prichard, L. H. Beckham, J. C Hunter Sr., E. W. Ledbetter, R. M. Fielder, Carl Springer, Walter Johnson, Grover Yea.lts, L. C. Jennings Sr. and Mae McDaniel.) It, too, has a long history and, M have others, it has changed with the changing times to be- come luncheon meeting of Does'the Quilt Club quilt? Ru- mor says it doesn't. But once it did and today's members couldn't give up name with the tradition thfe one has. Quilt Club ...New Idea Sew- ing Club Sewing Club" -bedrocks of the social order. NEWS INDEX IICTION I1, ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY MORNING, JULY Secretary Robert S. McNaniara faults, or, as it, grave told governors Monday that National Guard should whacked and promptly rah into a solid wal LAW AND ORDER COMES TO Freeman was one of the many beauties who participated in the Texas Cowboy Reunion Parade Monday- afternoon in Stamford. She was on a float entered by the Prep-Teen Club of Stam- ford. The float extended a big "howdy" to the estimated to persons who watched the parade. (Staff Photo by Henry Wolff Jr.) Attend Opening Cowboy Reunion Rodeo By BOB COOKE Reporter-News Farm Editor STAMFORD An estimated crowd of was on hand for the opening performance of the ,962 Texas Cowboy Reunion Ro- deo Monday night. The veteran John Selman, fore- man of the SMS Flat Top' Ranch, continued in his customary role of leading the colorful grand entry which was comprised of more than 500 mounted cowboys and cowgirls including many of he visiting riding groups present or the afternoon parade. Pivots for the opening spectacle were set by members of the Has- kell County Sheriff's Posse which Other stories, Pg. 1-B, 8-B was judged first place winner in the parade. At the conclusion of the grand entry A. C. Humphrey, parade chairman, presented trophies to the Haskell group; the Shamrock Sheriff's Posse, second in the parade; and the Fisher County Sheriff's Posse, third. The second performance of the show will bsgih at 8 p.m. day. However there will be slack roping event at 8 a. m. Tuesday and at a. m. Tuesday the old-time cowhands will stage their annual calf roping contest. Among the special groups pres- Parade Features 600 Horsemen ent for the Monday night show he were a special car from Fort Worth ridden by Wright Arm- strong, vice president of the Fort Worth- and Denver RR, and. his wife, and a bus-load of youngsters from the West Texas Rehabilita- tion Center at Abilene. In the cowgirl sponsored bar- rel, race, Marie. Voss of Snyder, riding Underworld Joe, funshed first with a time of 20.9. Second went to Tiny Nancy Tucker of "TUBS- Throckmortbn riding a horse named Dunney and representing Texas Experiment Ranch with a time of 21.6 seconds. Third was Pat McNatt representing ..BMP Quarter Horse Ranch Of Plain- view, riding a horse named Hard Luck Hank. Her time was 21.9. Fifteen cowgirls rode in the open barrel race. Brenda Dalby of Aspermont representing the Dalby Ranch was.thrown in going- around the second barrel, but her injuries were not serious. In the first round of the open cutting, the following riders par- By JIM EATON Reporter-News Staff Writer STAMFORD-A 40-minute-longi >arade, with estimated 600 horse- men participating, officially open- ed the annual Texas Cowboy Re- union here Monday afternoon. The colorful parade also had organizational and commercial loats, individual and anching entries. Many area rjding clubs, along with the one from Altus, Okla'., participated. A member of the Shamrock; Sheriff's Posse received a broken ight leg when his horse slipped and fell .just before the parade started. Admitted to Stam- ford Sanitarium was Ford New- See STAMFORD, Pg. 3-A, Col. 3 .kirk, 46. Also admitted to the same hos- pital was Jesse Green, 62, of Lueders. He apparently was over- come by heat while watching the parade. An attendant reported he was in good condition. A..C. Humphrey, .long r time parade chairman, estimated that from to people watch- ed the believe it was one of the largest, if not the largest crowd we have had to see a said Humphrey. Winning first in organizational decorated floats was' the' Old See PARADE, Pg. 3-A, Col. 3 89Q 596T OT "oavw svx3i modernization, Vandlyer said. But but McNamara's hand isn't veiy "but I am adamantly oppoMd IK Pa. (ARt-pefease asserted they had found plenty large." ._.... _ any, units." be He first told all the governors gathered for their 54th annua inference, thaf there'should lie a cut nrthe Reserve manpower and in the number of Nationa Guard units. McNamara's speed) was coolly received, with no interruptions for applause and only a polite bam clapping at the end. Even before McNamara spoke he Military Advisory Committee lad come out strongly against any cuts, and its Gov Ernest Vandiver of Georgia, pfe- )ared a speech in which he' sail UcNamara's plan contains grave deficiencies. When Vandiver made his short reply, his speech got twice as learty a reception as McNamara lad received. McNamara then met with the governors' military committee for more than an hour behind closet doors. As the meeting broke up, Mc- v'amara told the committee, "I've enjoyed this a whole lot and learned a few things. There's a, deficiency in our communications tayew that." Vandiver told' aiShastily called news conference that the meet- ing was amiable, but that there would be no backing down. In his prepared text put out in Washington McNamara had said 'We want no paper tigers in-our Reserve structure." This was deleted shortly before 5 made his talk. Considering his strong private eelings, Vandiver's public com- nents were surprisingly mild. The governors aren't opposed to Reporter-News Business Office Closed July 4th While both edition! will be published Wednesday, July 4th, the business office; .will be closed. Classified adt to inn Thursday mast be in the office by 5 p.m. Tuesday. If you should miss your Wednesday morning, call OR 3-4271 by If you should miss your Wednesday evening paper, call OR 3-4271 between 4 and 6 p.m. McNarnaras plan publicans, but they got Democrat- calls lor men. McNamari Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of ic support. would reduce this, to ed the Gov. Farris Bryant of Florida There are Cwnkunit lei. nprs will pass a resolution con- said: "I am vigorously opposed, cations across the country. demning McNamara's proposal. have 'been raised in the resolu- tions committee about this Hampshire, chairman of the con- Namara thinks he's going to do. Powell and Rockefeller are Re- I want combat ready troops in Namara would cut these- "T know some real questions Florida that I can use if there Is from the military point of view disaster or disorede. I recognize bower administration, had that there must be support troops, Rockefeller said. that should be available in an the Army Reserve withoot much Goy. Wesley Powell of New attention to the military Meets Gov. Orval E, Faubus of Arkan- ference, said "That's what Me- sas said be is willing to cooperate true for a -10 per cent cut sag- in producing a modern Guard, At present ne ttfienw jxogYaint McNamara claimed the the figures of 000 m but we need the kind of troops National .Guard and 300.0W foe sity. And he said the same gested in 1959. Emergency Centers Used i FO Following Doctors' Strike REGINA, Sask. (AP) Emer- gency medical centers, many staffed by physicians on a volun- tary and no-fee basis, operated throughout Saskatchewan Monday night amid against this a doctors' strike province's two-day- old compulsory ance plan. Socialist Premier Woodrpw Uoyd said nSarliTall pravincia] hospitals are meetjng.lheir areas' needs despite ofregil- lar practice by a majority of Sas- katchewan's 700 private doctors. But a number of clinics and hospitals were reported operating without normally adequate staffs. A number of doctors, protest- ing the compulsory feature of the government program, took off on vacation or quit the province to practice elsewhere. Hie parents of a 10-months-old baby who died Sunday from what was apparently meningitis charged that lack of available physicians was a contributing fac- tor in the death. The parents had sought unsuccessfully to find med icai help over a wide area. Elsewhere two youths requiring transferred 60 miles from Wey- burn to Begina because of the unavailability of doctors. Uoyd maintained, however, medical insur- staking physicians declared that the doctors won't return to normal practice until the province's So- ciali4 government drops the med- ical program. Thestclaim that the plan tfie first of its type on a inajo'f'Male in North Hie door of the people of-Saskatchewan.' tharanmcreasing'number'of "doc- foreign sugar purchases, but not tors are giving service. Infor- mants-said about 100 doctors plan nearly so much as he asked. The Sugar Act, originally passed to continue practice under the in- in 1934, expired for the first time Saturday midnight. It will be rein- REUNION SCHEDULE TUESDAY, JULY 3 8 go-round slack roping contest. 8 and senior registered Quarter Horse cutting contest. Cowboy Reunion Assn. business meeting and election. 12 wagon dinner at ranch chuck wagons on Texas Cowboy Reunion grounds. 2 Cowboy Reunion Assn. memorial service in Bunk House. The Rev. Jack Southerland and Mrs. Southeriand to Have charge. 8 wagon dinner at ranch chuck wagons on Texas Cowboy Reunion grounds. 8 entry in rodeo arena, cowboy rodeo contests, barrel fleet for cflwgiri sponsors, cutting horse contest. 'Dancing in Round-Up Hall, "The doctors- and nurses are working said Dr. Mark Haitian, medical coordinator of St Paul's Hospital in Saskatoon. "It will-.eventually be a ijuestion of how long tliis-can last." The chief spokesman for the Dalgleish of Saskatoon, president to government contiol of the med- ical profession. can be no further nego- 3 this unjust and act, is asserted the Dr. N. D, of the Saskatchewan College .pi Surgeons and Physicians. PASSES SENATE President Senf Sugar Measure WASHINGTON Sen- ate passed and sent to President Kennedy late Monday a compro- mise Sugar Act extension bill in- .The vote was 54-12. The measure gives, the Presi- dent some flexibility in handling surance plan. Normal closing of clinics and offices for the Dominion Day holi- day weekend made it impossible to determine the exact number of physicians on strike. Free emergency treatment was afternoon of debate in which sev- provided at 34 of the province's 120 hospitals by about 240 volun- teer doctors. stated as soon as Kennedy signs the measure. The compromise bill had cleared the House SaturdayV The Senate passed it only alter a long TEMPERATURES many refer- am. timta 72 1.00........... 75 2.00 72 eral senators complained that the bill continued subsidies unfair to U.S. consumers. Others sharply attacked the ex- tensive lobbying they said had _._ surrounded the consideration of the bill this year. There also were ences in the debate to the angry response of some Latin-American countries to the bill worked out by Senate-House conferees lest Friday night. Argentina complained that it was left out entirely in the alloca- tion for foreign quotas. The Do- minican Republic said it gQt far too small an allotment. Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, Minn., the Democratic whip, told the Senate Kennedy and the State Department were concerned, about this, and that an effort would bt made to rectify it The compromise biil extends the foreign purchase provisions of the Sugar Act to Dec. 31, the domestic sections to Dec. 1968. WEATHER 77 77 It it TOO 890 and tow Iv f 9 70. iamt data Uat it alfklt aaari toOcM: Barometer natOu at pjavtt.ll. BanMry pm.: Kparcaifc, Retail Soles Tax V Slated for Impact By LANE TALBURT Impact Mayor Pertta took Die a pba Moo- day nlfbt wfce appnxhn la UiJBBdlttf jaJMkotte bmncct Mid la tfet photo, Pi, t-B) 1 City OoMdhM MttH ftt CWHITMI Ml mntioo te flnl yw 9QVI 9CvMs> iwrt   

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