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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 26, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 26, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               M LATEST SPORTS "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES W BIST YEAR, NO. 343 SATURDAY 3 STAR uD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, MORNING, MAY 26j 9908 XQ oo GES IN TWO SECTIONS Asiociated Press (IP) Farm Wife Killed By Tornado at Hamlin At Least Three Homes Smashed By JACK SHERIDAN and MARVIN' MURPHY Reporter-News Staff Writers Tornadoes smashed at least CLEAN UP DAMAGE A tornado did considerable damage to the home of Mr. three farm homes in West Central and Mrs. Woodrow Bagley eight, miles so nth of Hamlin Friday evening. Here, from Texas Friday night, killing a left, Mrs. Clint Brandon, Wanda Brandon, Mr. Brandon, Ronnie Bagley and Mae- deen Rainwater help to save some of the household furnishings. Bagley and his son, Ronnie, were hauling a load of wheat to an elevator and Mrs. Bagley was fol- lowing them in a car at the time the tornado struck their home. (Photo by Bob Craig) Farm Bill Gets Senate Approval WASHINGTON Sen- ate passed Friday a complex and controversal farm bill carrying many of the stiff production con- trols and penalties asked by Pres- ident Kennedy. WEATHER The bill also would: Expand existing export sale and disposal efforts for U.S. farm sur- pluses. Use repayments on past loansU'ay HS-I'IO. jby the Rural Electrificalion U, S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMEHCE WEATHEB Bl'KEAU (Weather Map, Pace 8-A) AD1LENE AND VICINITY (Radius 40 miles) Partly cloudy ani! warm with chance for evening and nighttime thun- dcrshowcrs Saturday and Sunday. High both tfays 35-33. Low Saturday nteht 7fl. NORTH CENTKAL TKXAK Part- ly cloudy and warm Saturday nnd Sun- day. Isolated late (hunderstorms. High Saturday 90-37. NORTHWEST TK.XAS Clrar to part- cloudy Sat-.irriay and Sunday. Widely scattered late thunderstorms- Little in temperatures. HiKh Saturday 90-08 SOUTHWEST TEXAS Partly cloudy i and warm .Saturday and Sunday with1 jcletv late thunder.'; h a few orth. Histi Satur-j Passage came after a week ofjmin'slration to create a pool for! sharp debate. A nearly solid line-jfuture loans, up of Democrats rebuffed all ma- Set up a new agency in the Ag- jor efforts to revise the riculture Department to push in-j 73 Texas senators canceled each other with Sen. Ralph Yarborough voting for the bill and Sen. .Johnj Tower voting against passage. I ELECTED the direction of less stringent con-! dustrial uses of farm commodi-j trols. Ities, including research on both] The measure now goes to the and markets. House where a similar bill is al ready awaiting floor action. Most important features of thei Senate bill are proposed new con- trols for Secretary of Agriculture! Orville L. Freeman over planting) A KJ and marketing of whcal and of] corn and other livestock feed grains. Government price support pro- grams for these grains have piled up some billion worth of sur- pluses among the more than billion of farm commodities now in government hands. Sen. Allen .1. Ellendcr, D-La., who was Senate floor manager for the bill, estimated that the annu- al bill of about. ?2 billion for stor- ing and handling these grains could, be cut sharply if farmers accept the new programs. The new controls would come Hamlin farm wife and seriously injuring her husband Mrs. Roy Smith, 59, was dead on arrival at Anson General Hos- pital and her husband, 62, was treated there for multiple bruises over most of his body and multiple fractures s of his left kg. The couple was in their house eight miles southeast of Hamlin when the tornado struck about p.m. The twister destroyed the house, tore down a garage but left untouched a car parked there. Other farm homes destroyed nearby were those of Herman A. Probst and A. W. Bagley. Bagley, his son and wife were n Anson when the tornado hit their house, destroying it. a barn, and tractor shed. The farm is owned by Dr. Abilene. As Bagley was returning home, Ihe drove by the Smith place and heard Smith calling for help. He ran through the field from where close to the school there and that an air conditioner was ripped from the building. He said he thought he saw a chair whirled up into the funnel cloud. Power Out Power was also knocked out at Sylvester about p.m. Airs. Fred Fountain said she ami about 10 others saw a tornado hi; about 10 15 miles northeast of Sylves- :r. "It formed and stayed in the air a few minutes, then hit the round and busted things all to she said-. She added that she saw a long white tail dip out of the clouds and red dust logged up from the ground. Light rain fell at Sylvester and hail ranged from pea size to a half-inch in diameter. Jerry Sparks, Reporter-News correspondent from Stamford, said he saw a tornado near the Corinth Community which stayed on the ground from 10 to 15 min- utes, stirring up big clouds oil dust. He said an extremely black SCENE OF FATALITY Mrs. Roy Smith, 59, was killed Friday night when a nado struck her house on the Jasper Gentry farm eight miles southeast of Hamlin; This is the damage done to the garage on the place. (Photo by Bob Craig) NEWS INDEX Hist! at i.m.: i Hish ill Adamson of j funnel dipped down from over- hanging gray clouds and was moving from the southwest to the northeast. Sparks said he also saw two other funnels, both in the vicinity i he heard Smith calling and found of Avora and Uieders. He report- 'Ihim in his pickup truck. Jed scattered hail with rain meas- a.u'iey said Smith had crawled uring about .05-inch. about 130 yards from the house Hailstones to the pickup, apparently in an were reported big as golf balls at Avoca during SECTION A Obituaries......, Sports Amusements Oil news SECTION B Church news....... Women's news Comics........... Editorials......... TV Scout Rodio-TV loss Goree Bridge Quir Farm news, markets 2 6-8 10 11 2 3 4, 5 6 9 9 9 10 effort lo go for help. A Magcobarla wind and rain storm. Severej Oil Service truck arrived shortly [lightning was seen during ihej afterward and one of the men'storm and electricity was inter-i radioed to Anson for an am-'rupted briefly. Rainfall measured! bulance. j.40-inch. .Mrs. Smith was found about: Kno.x City had .50-inch of rain 20 minutes later in a ditch 200iand Brainpower Lost Cited by Connally BROWNVVOOD (HNS) Edu- cation, industry and good-natured punches at his opponent were highlights of John Connally's talk here Friday night at a chili dog supper that attracted an esti- Absentee Vole Count Now 149 Absentee voting for the June 2; power, but we're not" keeping it." Democratic runoff primary con-JGonnally told the crowd that galh- milu'on. "He's going to do all this while repealing the sales which is bringing in the former Navy secretary: said. Earlier in the day at Athens, Connally told nearly 300" workers ercrl m Browmvood's Coggin Park de- o the size of baseballs. ;tlamoge had not been Mrs' fCheslcr Hulcheson. (nartoent are ''going west of Ihe Hamlin was left without power; I Deadline for absentee voting jsjKockj Mountains. He said mated Central Terarrs from at (he Curtis Malhes plant that Brown and 17 surrounding governor he would be "A work- ''es ling governor and that the gover- "We are producing the brain-jnor's door will be open to you in- dividually or as a group." Ear- lier at the annual Athens old fiddlers' reunion he crossed paths with Jack Cox, Republican guber- natorial candidate. Connally will campaign Satur- day in Denton, Gainesville and Sherman-Denison. Ufc and Mrs. Connally will attend the annual' Kclaled story Pg. 9-A UJBBOCK E. H. Dannei San Angelo, president of the Gen- eieral Telephone Co. of the Soulh- Into effect only if farmers give ajwcst was of two-thirds vote of approval in Wcs[ Chamber of Com er referenda. at a nt the WTCC Senate opponents of the wheat bmrA of (tircctars Friday and corn controls insisted farm-j f Abj, ers will reject them. If they do.j Ireelected as treasurer and Fred he price supports drop sharpy, nds of as fiv y and the secretary may sell large stocks of the government, Danncr succeeds ,I. Carter King held surpluses. Tl. as of tne Missing from the Senate bill is wnich is lts an administration request for ai44lh ammal hcre new milk and dairy control and D.lnnei. 59 a nalivc of Illinols support proposal. Both the bccn president of Ihe General Agriculture Committee and Company of the South- turned down efforts to silK.c 1957 Tnc fjrm serves 'his. I more than cuslotnors in A last-minute effort to gel in Texas, New Mexico. Oklahoma, a new dairy program was defeat- ed .70 to 13. But the Senate bill includes re- visions of several laws and pro- grams intended to induce farmers to convert grain and crop lands into wildfifc refuges, to water con- servation or to recreational pur- poses. RAV GKISHAM reelected treasurer In accepting the presidency Arkansas and Louisiana. Damier first came to Texas in I as president of the Texas Telephone Company, which merg-panner declared the most impor- od with General Telephone. He requirement for successful named operating vice president of a community, business 1956. He previously served (hoIT an area is the altitude of WTCC as a district vice involved. for about -10 minutes after the! struck there. Service wasj lotored around p.m. Total rainfall in Hamlin amount- j td to 1.10 inches, wilh reports of up to 2 inches in the area. A small amount of hail fell, with some of it up to tennis size. Thirty West Texas Utilities and REA power line poles were down- td by the twister, which cut a path as much as a mile wide in I sonic places. WTU reported thai, crews were in the area rebuilding lines, bul were hampered by mud- ds fields caused by the rain. Where the tornado went across the highway southeast of Hamlin, Willis Steward of Comanchc, driv- ing a truck pulling a load of ir- rigalion pipe, spotted a funnel, slopped nnd ran to the edge of a wheat field. The twister damaged the truck, but Steward injured. Al McCaulIcy, Lulher Mayhcrry said he -saw a funnel dip down See STORM, Pg. 4-A, Col. 4 o p.m. Tuesday. COALITION Laos Schedules New Conference the B1ENTIANE, Laos tralist Prince Souvanna Phouma, who was in Paris during the nice-breaking Red offensive that of Souphanouvong an encouraging sign for a quick resumption of negotiations on a unity govern- Ihe gridiron dinner in Dallas Satur- L'nivcrsiiy of California alone gelsjday night. more kinds from this deparlmentj- Ihan all educational institutions inj j Texas combined j The candidate praised Brown- jwood and Central Texas for pro- jgrcss in education, industry andj, iwaler conservation, but pointed! lout the need for even more in-j jdustry to keep the young people in their home communities. "1 am going lo be a booster not a business j t Fridav (0 j he said. He said the youth and d f Eu s fleeing community could be (he independ- Algeria Exit Route Closes strengthened the military position jment- These worc brokcn off by of the Pathet Lao rebels, returned Boun Oum last December in a to Laos on Friday for another over the allocation of the tempt to form a coalition of the interior and de- control police, the n i v-ui 11 management e and as a director. Sunday in Sbilem A County by County Roundup on Politics in West .Texas A Sample Ballot thtst, plus a visit to Brtcktnridgt, latest sports, spot news! The convention opened Friday wiUi registration, a board ol di- rectors meeting and a luncheon. A general session was held at 2 p.m. Speakers on a panel dis- cussion of "How Kvery Commun- ity Can Share in Stock Feeding" included Marvin Morrison, stock feeder from Higley, Ariz.: Grady Shepard, farmer feeder of Hale Center; Ollie Liner, county agri- cultural agent from Hale County. Speakers on "Tourism What II Can Mean for West Texas and Texas" included Alvin A Burger, Auslin, executive director of the Texas Research Lctiguu: Willam M. Gosdin, Lubbock, of the Department of Horticulture and Park Management at Texas Tech; Tom H. Taylor Austin, di- rector of travel and information wilh the Texas Highway ment; William M. Raines, San An- :onlo, president of the Texas Tour- ist Council. Saturday's program includes a a.m. general session, busi- ness session, annual report, sclcc- Ion of the convention city (or ami presentation of Ihe now offi- cers. A noon luncheon will close program. I lU.Guiel On Bean Tax AUSTIN (AP) Mum is the word around federal offices about Woodrow Bean's missing income tax returns. "We are in a pretty rough sit- uation. We can't confirm or deny said William Fowler, assistant director for South Texas for Internal Revenue Service in Austin. "Actually there is not a thing new we can release, on the record." "1 don't like to do this, bul I just cnn't say any thing on this case, Ernest Morgan from his San Antonio of- fice. "We'll let you have it as soon as we can." Neither Fowler nor Morgan would comment on the investiga- tion of Bean's admitted failure to file income tax returns since 1952. Bean, El Paso County judge, is Democratic runoff candidate for congressman-at-larRC. There have been reports that any official action on Bean's case may be delayed at least until alt- er the June 2 voting. The United States, the Soviet j Union and other members of the JH-nation Geneva conference on jLaos support Souvanna to head Ihe proposed coalition. U.S. efforts have included with- holding from Laos of million in monthly economic aid, and a campaign for Gen. Phoumi Nosa- van, the royal government's strong man deputy premier, to gel out. Premier Khrushchev pledged continued Soviet efforts to estab- lish the coalilion. He declared in a Moscow speech Friday his gov- crnmenl has pursued "and will slick lo the positions it expressed at the Geneva conference on Laos and in my talks with President Kennedy on the future of Laos." The premier-designate of a pro. iected regime of neutralists, righl- sls and leflisls that would succeed Ihe pro-Western govern nenl of Premier Prince Boun Oum, Souvanna had been out of he country for 50 visiting with his family in France. Souvanna flew from Rangoon, turma, in a Soviet-supplied plane by farm labor and learns working on Ihe zation problem. Connally proposed a ''New era of personal consideration for all Texans: a new era of dynamic leadership; an era of new hope." Don Yarborough's campaign royal armed forces and elections, {promises were labeled "amusing Boun Oum r.nd his followers did not want them to fall into Com- munist hands. by Connaliy. He said Yarbrough's proposed program would increase! Officials said no more refugees will be admitted to the airport until Sunday to facilitate an or- ganized departure nf some persons already camped there. Nineteen planes left during the day with 1.650 Europeans. Twenty two aircraft were to leave Satur- the slate's present budget day. Three Soviet Ships Watch U.S. Nuclear Test Action By ELTON C. FAY ;a U.S. destroyer to slay clear ofition, the Pentagon said. H WASHINGTON trio of the prescribed danger area, but o his headquarters at Khang Khay, i n the rebel-held Plaine des Jarres. Bad weather and en- giiw trouble had contributed to a hrcc-day delay in Rangoon. Reports received by the three- nation control commission from 
                            

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