Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 18, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 18, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 81ST YEAR, NO. 335 S96T OT ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 18, 8VX31 SECTIONS PAGE [By Katharyn Duff] The wind, which for eons this week has kept West Texas hair and nerves on tiptoe, brought to mind an old Fisher County gal who once got out of Fisher Coun- ty for a while. She went to Denton to the teachers college for a six-weeks term and came home right cul- tured and sophisticated. Even hoity-toity, you might say. Friends and family gathered at the bus stop to greet her on her return from the East and she stepped out into a sharp and not uncommon breeze that ruffled her carefully creased hair. she said, as she tried to finger curls and waves back in place. "Does the wind still blow in West As regarding the current tor- rents of air and they made negotiation of the Woolen Corner an indecent undertaking we can be thankful, at least, they were generally southerly, thus free of dust and sand. Definition of a farmer: A man out standing in his field. The new highways are won- ders of design and engineering. Particularly around the District Highway Office off the new and modern West Freeway-U. S. 83- 277. Some time back Hal Wood- ward, State Highway Commis- sioner from Coleman, and sev- eral other highway dignitaries visited District Highway Engi- neer Jake Roberts at. the office. Woodward was driving. And Woodward, for some rea- son, turned north into a south- bound lane. Some ribbing followed. Wood- ward discussing Jake's highway designing and Jake declaring Woodward proved "you don't have XD be able to drive to be a good highway commissioner." Woodward predicted, once the group was safely back at the highway office, that Jake him- self couldn't get to a certain des- tination on his new roads with- out getting lost. Jake look the [he wheel and the group head- ed out. The engineer was soon eating his words. He took the wrong ramp onto the right road. Woodward and Roberts, in fairness we must report, are not the only motorists to get into (he wrong lane around the high- way office. Two or three fellows from the district office have dune it. A man from the U. S. Public Hoads Bureau was guilty. And, it might be added, the reporter who reported this is Die latest member of the Ab- sent Minded Club, All you need is: A co-pilot; a navigator; a set of up-to-date maps; the instincts of Columbus. 3103 Atmciated Prat HOFFA BOOKED Teamsters Union P resident James R. Hoffa is booked by Cpl. E. L. Kutz Thursday night on an assault charge sworn out by Samuel Baron of the Teamsters warehouse division. Baro n said he was beaten up Thursday morn- ing at the union's headquarters. Hoffa was booked at Washington's first precinct police station. (AP Wirephoto) JFK Said Eying Troops for Laos By ROBERT S. ALLEN and PAUL SCOTT t, "the establishment of a neu- tral government in Laos is still Union Boss Hoffa Booked On Assault 9909 X8 03 631VS 33IAH3S HIIJOH3IH Y Vows Full Estes Probe 75 FBI Agenls On Case WASHINGTON (AP) Team- ster Union President James R. Hoffa was booked for simple as-! By GARDNER L. BRIDGE WASHINGTON Kennedy said Thursday the FBI and other government agencies arc pressing their investigation to determine "whether any federal employe or member of Congress was involved" in the Billie Sol Es- :es scandal. Kennedy, disclosing that 75 FBI agents have been assigned to the case, noted that action has al- been taken against some Agriculture Department employes and he told his news conference: "This government is staying -ight on Mr. Estes' tail." Kennedy's statement that the fustice Department and Internal Revenue Service had been con- ducting "a very thorough investi- gation" of the tangled affairs of the Texas promoter followed the formal ordering of a full-scale Senate probe. The go-ahead for a series of public hearings that may reach into high echelons of both the {Kennedy and Eisenhower adminis- sault Thursday night after an aide charged the short, stocky labor WASHINGTON principal objective. We be- Kcnnedy is ready to send US government roops into southern Laos if the! Communists continue to press be arranged if the Com- heir offensive in (hat small agree to a new had beaten him up at un east Asian kingdom. jfire." The President plans to commitj Jn djscussing the Souti, viel U.S. ground and air forces situation, the President re- in Thailand to Ihe defense ofjportetl lhat he is considering the (Vientiane, the southern capital of commjtmcnt of U. S. air power trations was voted at a closed-door session of the Senate's permanent investigations subcom- mittee headed by Sen. John L, McClellan, D-Ark. How soon the hearings will start ion headquarters. ,eft open_ but was Sam Baron, 59, field director of j reported hoping to get them un- Ihe Teamsters' national ware-jder way before the end of this house division, said Hoffa (in addition to U.S. helicopters) in the battle against the pro-Corn- Laos, if such military action should become necessary. Also, he is considering a Joint jnlunjst yiet Cong guerrillas. Chiefs of Staff recommendation ----------------__-------------------- lhat U.S. and South Viet Nam air I limits bomb Chepone. the big XnAUfOfC nnmist air and supply base iujJIIVWCIJ southern Laos. I These military moves, which are awaiting the outcome of back- stage diplomatic negotiations with Russia, were fully outlined by the In Area Today The Abilene area may get some showers Friday, but those March- like winds are expected to con- j President during his White House briefing of congressional leaders. After reporting plans to through Saturday jU.S. troops lo Thailand, Ihe Thc forecas[ fof a ident toW the bipartisan group oil lleskln'ive leaders: scattered_evening andjiight- HE LOVES A PARADE Little Danny Delarosa, 3-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Delarosa of Haskell, was one of the many West Texans who lined streets in Haskell Thursday afternoon to enjoy the parade opening the Rice Springs Rodeo in Haskell. (Staff photo by Jimmy Parsons) knocked him down twice and shoved him over a chair. Baron Kennedy obviously was primed for what turned out lo be the first question put at his con- Billie Sol Estes af- fair. The President twice emphasized Connaliy Train In Area Today The John B. Connaliy "victory [.special" will roar through West j "This matter came lo public Friday, carrying the The'diarg'e'of'simple assault isilentio" bccmise this gubernatorial candidate, misdemeanor. The maximum mrirctc'd Mr' Estcs' beforehiis family and a press corps of displayed a cut over his right eye. a blackened left eye, bruises; on his face and legs. Hoffa was booked at First Pre- cinct police headquarters and re- that thc s financial mamp- eased on ?500 bond. He showed were f'rst p no effects of any fieht. When attention when the federal gov- lewsman asked whether he had mdlcled hlm Apnl 5 on ocen injured, Hoffa said he would riave no comment. charges. AT HASKELL Longest Parade Launches Rodeo i "Additional military moves will (be laken if the ipro-Communi. j Pcilhet Lao forces offensive. Troops hei .Thailand will be used to keep 'Vientiane, the administrative Cap- ital of Laos, from falling lo thc Communists should thai become necessary." j The President said he still has j hope that the Soviet will put pres- thunderstorms Friday. jsli Cloudy to partly cloudy, warm renew and windv is predicted ing sent to and Saturday. Darrell Crawford of Abilene's penalty is one year in prison. Theja slalc, aficncy before P'ace else he. said. 1 Chairman William E. Miller 'ne slate- warrant was taken out Municipal Court Judge Edward metropolitan newsmen through- By BOB COOKE Reporter-News Farm Editor parade inaug- urating the annual Eice Spring Rodeo here Thursday afternoon was described by longtime Haskell Beard. Hoffa will appear in citizens as one of the longest they In the tradition of past seen in many years, lee sharply dissented, saying, stop.. speakers, Connaliy i The peuormance of the Hoffa, wearing a erev checked! i i I not .square with he record. suit, strode into the police sla-l lion with a wink at newsmen. He "The President's statement... does !wjn spenk frnm the back platform ,of his train as it pulls Weeks before the Kennedy ad-1 ions along the Texas dr an hour later at the TT P )ir 11 T-, ii'uvt. "'I on iluul dL lilt. f f wheel of a Mack convertible after ministration began to stir on the j jc Railroad route. three night show, sponsored by the Junior Chamber of Commerce. 8 Pm Friday and i Saturday's shows will begin at the averaged about 15 miles an hour being booked, interviewed, photo-: See ESTES, Pg. 2-A, Col. 4 cent at p.m. High readings of 85-90 degrees Today's political story: Seems someone was asking President Kennedy if he might change vice presidents and the President asked it the fellow' could suggest some running mate who would help Ihc ticket more than does Vice President Johnson. "Well, now. licp. Adam Clay- ton Powell of Now York, now he might pull some votes." The President pondered and then he said, "Hmmm....No, I don't think- so. "I don't think the country is ready yet for a Baplist vice sure on Pathci Lao forces lo re-1 Friday and Saturday and a low store the cease-fire in Laos. of 70 Friday night were predicted. WEATHER AtW.KNK VIOI.V. MIlMI Glumly lo nnrllv fM windy Friday and SaWnV.'Chancr lor Ihiinijcnlorim l-'rfdav Jvcn. nS ll f "m NORTH CKNTIUI. TBXAS Pnrllv cloudy and continued warm Prklay anil Saturday, inch Kridny NOnTHWEST TKXA'S 1-nrlly cloudy Friday and S.-duril.-iy. WMHy mnllorrd iflcrnoiin and f-vviilim Ilinndcrslormn Wi'M ami norlh. Inch I'Ylday -n-flll SnilTIIWKST TKXAS Partly rlouily und warm Krlday and Sainrd'nv n'ilh Mallc-rrd nfU'innnn and cvi-ninx Uniadcr- Mull Kriila.v TKMI'KIUTIIKFS ThiTH, a.m. Thiirs. n.m, 70 A fin By DOUGLAS li. CORNELL WASHINGTON or been be sub- Kennedy said three times immediate action and day his administralion brought the scandalous Billie Sol Esles case lo light and that it is staying right on Mr. Estes' 75 FBI agents. Kennedy said the administration   ducers, and Billy Jack Ray, Jay- cee president, were introduced, the mounted square dance team representing the Dyess AFB sta- ble performed. The Dyess AFB Riding Club made its public debut during the parade. Other riding groups' in the line of march, other than those mentioned were: Olney Boots and Saddle Club, Winters Riding Club, SeyijibUr Remuda, CaJlahan Sheriff's f.os- Sheriff s Posse of Brownfield trav- Riding "Ihost organization, Haskell Sheriff's Posse. The Indian band of Haskell High School led the parade. Friday night the feature of the second performance will be a greased pig scramble for boys 14 years of age and under. Eight Haskell merchants have donated the pigs for the scramble win- ners. and the Perry County to Abilene at p.m. will Mayor C. R. Kinard. Gordon'will present watches stm'fSck organiialion was selected by the judges as winner first place trophy for icond unty )lace icritf's Pos- Trophies Were presented to the winners at the conclusion of the ARMED FORCES DAY simple assault. [word from President Baron said that behind the in- that the government is keepin; cident was a difference between Hoffa's "conception of (lie labor movement and mine." in close touch with Ihe dispute. The President, at his news con- ference in Washington, said La- anything the government can ;lo "I never became part of hisjbor Secretary Arthur J Goldher Baron said. "I avoidedjis maintaining contact. If ihere is him as much as I could." Baron, a graying, 152-pound la- bor movemcrt veteran, said he had been in union work for 35 years. He said he swore out the complaint because "no one has Kastlmid Cisco Baird Abilene Sweet water Colorado City appropriately lo aid in reaching Big Spring a settlement, he added, it will do so. It was expected lhat the gov- ernment's next move will be to ARRIVE J1.-55 DEPART Sat. ever bit me before that if I riidn'tjtry to get negotiators for the mi fight back with my fists, I fought back every other way I could." Hoffa is 49 years old and weighs about 200 pounds. NEWS INDEX SECTION A Food news 5 Obilnarict 7 SECTION B Womcn'i ncwi........2, 3 Spom Oil ncwi SECTION C Armed Forcei Section 1-12 SECTION D Amuiemcnti 3 Editorial! 4 Comlct.................S Perm imrkiti....., 11 TV Scout............., U Ko.lo.TV lion's rail lines and Ihe five op- erating unions back into negolia- tions. Management representatives, in announcing a breakolf in confer- ences, had left the door ajar for intervention by federal officials. Leaders of the unions, totaling 210.090 engineers, firemen and others, said they were ready to reopen conferences on proposed sweeping changes in work rules 8-10 ''our systems. 11 "We do not expect a carriers slated. Spokesmen for thc unions, after their meeting, accused railroad represcnlnlives of breaking a pledge and negotiating in bad (aith but added: "We arc not talking strike at the present time." FLOOD CONTROL VOTE DIFFERENT Abilene city commissioners renewed the city's position on the million flood control program Thursday, but the vote had a slightly different complexion. In other business, commis- sioners: by a policy change, opened bids on some water pipe with no fanfare. a contract for a fish- ing pier on Lake Fort Phan- tom Hill under advisement after a discussion which hint- ed at a lawsuit. another scwoi- farm damage suit for less than on For details, see stories on Page 1-B. Luncheon Today Opens Activi A "fly-in" address by General Paul D. Adams, commander ol Ihe U. S. Strike Command at Me- Dill AFB. Fla.. at noon Friday in the Vapor Trails Service Club at Dyess AFB will officially open Ab- ilene's observance of Armed Forc- es Day activity. Dyess will open its gates for the public Saturday. Gen. Adams, who will land at Dyess at a.m. and leave at p.m., will talk to about 800 civic and military leaders at Va- por Trails Service Club. The four stirf general com- mands a combination Air Force- president of the Abilene Ch, of Commerce, which is si the event. Entertainment wilt provided by the Abilene Chrutiaa College A Cappclla Choir. The general will be met at tto Dyess flight line by Chamber President Jim Lauderdalc, Brif, Gen. Pinkham Smith, Col. liam L. McDowell Jr., Col. Don- ald F. Blake and other men and civic leaders. Participating service clubi ftfc elude the Abilene Kiwanb Qdk, Abilene Jaycees, South AltflW Kiwanis Club, UOM West Abilene Kiwanis Club, west Abilene Rotary ning Licr.s Club, CUk, Key City Kiwanii Chil Abilene RoUry Club, cm Club, Army Icani of air transports, fighters and guerilla paralroop- j cis from his McDill AFB head- quarters. Master of cercmonici for dinner will be J. S. Unxtordab.lfei TOUCH,   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication