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Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, May 15, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 15, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT UT 1PT LToOfiTOTHWW Pf 81ST YEAR NO. 332 PAGE ONE ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 15, 3A 3io3 kGES IN TWO SECTIONS He deals in numbers, Social Security numbers, but sortie names attached to some num- bers are by way of being a hob- by for R. R. Tuley Jr., Abilene district manager (or that gov- ernmental agency. He has several favorites, names he lias encountered per- sonally as the good people came forth seeking Social Security cards. There was that woman in Houston, "Free Love and that East Texan, "Boston Green Okra." Social Security records have in them one gentleman named "Charles 3-4 and there was that woman who married a Social Security employe and had her name on her card changed from "Short" to "Tall." But Tuley's very favorite name came to him when a charming young walked into the Shreveport office when he worked there to get her So- cial Security number and card. As instructed, she filled out the form and turned it back to the clerk. The clerk handed it back. "We need your first she said. "That's my first the young woman insisted and pulled out baptismal certificate, library card and driver license to prove it. How did she get such a name? The young lady sighed and told her story. Mama had wanted to call her Mary and Papa had favored Sally and the two names didn't go well together. So a young sister was asked for a sugges- tion and she looked at the baby and commented on her size. That comment was translated inlo the name: "T-9-C." It's a true story, Tuley says. He has told it in Houston and he has told it in Colorado City. And in both towns he has found in the audience which heard it kinsmen of the young woman. With some 137 million Social Security cards issued, it's a rare name such as T-9-C which Isn't duplicated. Tuley says. Now his own name, "Raleigh Robert Tuley isn't what you'd call ordinary. When he was training for his job Tuley was required to search the records (or duplica- tions of his own name. Sure enough, there he found one. two, three "Raleigh Robert Tul- eys Jr." He could account for two of them, himself and his father. But he is still searching for No. 3. The Social Security records are confidential, even to Social Security employes, he found out. Abilene Corporation Judge Don Wilson was hearing a case which grew out of a city auto wreck. The woman driver, who had been brought into court, was asked if she had given a signal she was turning she had indeed turned. Yes, she testified. She was quizzed on her car's turn signals and on her use thereof. Which way did you pull the lever? she was asked. she said. Doesn't that action turn on the left rear and left front blink- ers? she was asked. she uaid. "That's to let the car behind know which side to go around you." Auocintod frmt g gff Probers Say City Heart on Move First Meet On Property Is Held Related Story, Pg. 3-A YARBOROUGH BACK IN Q. Evans of Baird, left, Texas De- partment Commander of Veterans of World War I, and Tom Webb, center, Tay- lor County Democratic chairman, greet Don Yarborough on his arrival at Abilene Municipal Airport Monday. Webb, who handled local arrangements, said he hopes to plan another major campaign visit to Abilene for Yarborough before the June 2 Democratic run-off. (Staff photo by Jimm y Parsons) IN ABILENE Yarborough Hits Debate Refusal By LANE TALBURT Reporter-News Staff Writer Don Yarborough, renewing his challenge to John Connally for a ace to face debate, insisted iere Monday (hat the former Sec etary of the Navy has displayed 'weakness and fear" in refusing :n open discussion on state issues. "If my opponent does not have he courage to accept the chal- enge for a debate, it's unlikely lat he is going to have courage step out to face the issues of e 1960s." the Houston guberna- orial candidate declared. Continuing his long distance cbate with Connally over whether o debate. Yarborough told a small roup of his supporters during rief stay that many backers of defeated Democratic primary andidales have flocked to the 'arborough camp. Prominent among Abilene area upporters greeting Yarborough he Abilene Municipal Airport j Midland, Big Spring, Snyder and Sweetwater before arriving here for his third Abilene appearance in two months. Piloting the plane was Webb's law partner, Aubrey Stokes of San Angelo. Last stop for the day was Wichita Falls, where Yarborough stayed Monday night. Man Killed In Coleman Auto Crash COLEMAN (RNS) G. L. Hun ter, about 70, of Coleman, diet en route to a San Angelo hospital about p.m. Monday following a freakish accident in downtown Coleman in which Hunter's car smashed three other cars. Investigating City Patrolman D. Yarborough devoted much of h, M Robinson appar- IP hnllr Vicit Vidro in ff" the hour visit here in discussini proposed debale. He alsi touched briefly on his legislativi programs and accused "bit city" newspapers of showing "tre mendous favoritism" to Connally He was asked by a reportei :hat if he had led the primary fielt by votes, would he be eag er to debate the second placi replied Yarborough. "He (Connally) has lost so nany votes by his refusal to de >ate me that right now we are neck and neck. Then, he added, "If I pull so ere Tom Webb, Taylor County j far ahead of him that even his emocratie Chairman, and liog- r Q. Evans of Baird. Texas De- artment Commander of Veterans World War I. Webb, who hacked Gov. Price aniel in the first go scorted Yarborough around, lo (he lunty campaign headquarters for arborough in a trailer at Oak- jwood Village Center. There, the local Democratic of- ficial told a small group that he WEATHER newspaper cronies concede that I am pulling ahead of him, even then will I debate him." Connally's reason for not ac- cepting the challenge to debate, said Yarborough. is that 'I have nothing !o gain.' "This is a big office and if we're looking for personal gain, I think we're oriented in the wrong Yarborough said. surveyed the record of the two run off candidates, "and I con- cluded that the best man for Texas would be Don viewers would be able The trial ntlorney, turned pol- (o sizc the (wo candidates and "There's no doubt that the peo- ple of Texas would gain by the he said, explaining that itician began his day in San An- gelo, flying to Fort Stockton, See POLITICS, Pg. 2-A, Col. 3 ently suffered a "blackout" while driving in the business district here shortly after 1 p.m. The elderly man's foot appar- ently became entangled in the ac- celerator as the car's speed sud- denly increased and it slammed into three parked cars. Hunter suffered multiple frac- tures of the. ribs and lacerations about the eyes, nose and mouth. See FATAL, Pg. 2-A, Col. 4 By BILL McADA Reporter-News Staff Writer City Tax Department official unveiled a massive shuffling o commercial property valuation Monday night in the first of a se- ries of meetings scheduled to cli max with revision of the upcoming ;ax rolls. Ed Compere Jr., head of the Board of Tax Equalization, sah he will call a mass meeting of al owners of commercial property within the next 10 days to brie them on the results of the study "If it looks like as many as 75 per cent of those effected approve I will be ready to start the boarc Compere said. With this approval, the three- man board, made up of the same men who were on the board last year, will begin scheduled hear- ngs. Serving with Compere are Guy Shaw and R. L. Young. The detailed study of commer- cial property values over the city is the result of a year's intensive study which put Tax Department appraisers in an estimated business houses in Abilene. The study was ordered a year ago by the City Commission on recommendation of the Equaliza- ion board. The board, in a letter o the commission then, noted numerous inequities dotted in the ity's scattered commercial prop- erties. A general report of the findings the meticulous study was pre- ented to Abilene City Commis- ioners Monday night in a work- hop session which drew a handful f property owners. Glenn Smith, tax assessor-col- ector, told the commissioners the tudy brought out two important oints: 1. The economic heart of the STATE DEMOCRATS Syron; Skelton "of Temple, center, Democratic' of Austin, left, candidate for-Afc torney General, and Congressman Dowdy dinner in the Windsor Hotel Mon- day night before Tuesday's meeting of the State .Democratic Executive Committee. (See related'stories, Pg. 3-A) (Staff photo) See TAX, Pg. 2-A, Col. 4 ON LAOS CRISIS Top Leaders Due At Kennedy Talk WASHINGTON Presiden  Democratic primary, includini those in the Benton Musslewhite Dowdy race for the Sev enth Congressional District seat, will highlight a session here Tues- day of the State Democratic Ex- ecutive Committee. Musslewhite, who trailed Rep. Dowdy by 41 votes in unofficia) counting, has asked county chair- men of his district to make a re- meeting for Tuesday morn- ing." While no reason for the gather- ing was given, Kennedy undoubt- edly was prompted to summon the top Democrats and Republicans in Congress to go over U. S. concrete portion of the dam's spillway. Gandy fell about 30 feet when the bolt holding his safety belt tore Joose from the concrete. He hit ladder before landing on a weld- j ing machine. He was rushed to the hospital in a Satterwhite ambulance. Born May 24, 1905, in Hardin County, Mr. Gandy mover! to Cad- of that one district until the re- count is complete. For the past several days a special subcommittee headed by .1. H. Shelton of Brownwood has been from checking county reports Democratic chairmen in ing of dominantly delegates in conventions of sever- al cities last Saturday. Other business of the session will include appointment of com- mittees to make arrangements for the Sept. 18 state convention in El Paso. Byron Skelton of Temple, SDEC national committeeman, said "ha considered the fact that conserv- atives dominated several large county conventions to be an indi- cation of support for the Kennedy administration's "New Frontiers" program. He pointed out that both Democratic candidates in the run- off for governor John Connally and Don "friend- ly" to President Kennedy. Ed Connally, who hosted a preparation The panel also may hear pro- tests from several county conven- "from Cameron with his 'ion disputes around the state at for the official ses-jner Monday night for SDEC mjm- ibers and other party leaders in in Southeast Asia. Word of the White House action came a few hours after it parents when he was 7 years old He moved to Breckenridsre in 1924, .attending public schools here, disclosed that the government of j Hc married Wanda Hull of Chil- (1.8. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WKMIIKR BUREAU (Weather 4-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (llacliii. 40 Cloudy In the brtom inK party cloudy In Die afternoon and continued warm, windy, and humid Tues day and Wednesday. High "both Low TueMlay night 65-70. days NORTHWEST TEXAS: Partly cloudy Tuesday and Wednesday, afternoon and evening thundershowcrs Panhandle Weil Central. Ililh Tnenby S5-92. SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Partly cloudy and warm Tuesday and Wednes. day with scattered showers or thunder- Wednesday, lillh Tuesday B5.95. SOUTHWBST TEXAS: knd warm Tuesday and Wi Kattered Ihundtrahofrers. Wi _n No..... M-M. Partly cloudy Wednesday with Mattered Ihundtrahofrers. Wednesday and in North late Tuentur. llirh Tuesday TEMrKRATIJRCS al Hi Kl I-M :00 I "low tar M. Km bull mri Ml'. li f.m.i tttM, t.m.: H m MM, WASHINGTON (API-Sen. John J. Williams, R-Del., said Monday a woman employe of the Agri- culture Department was "rail- roaded to a mental institution for no reason other than that she knew too much" about the Billie Related stories, Pg. 2-B er a hearing by the District ol Columbia Mental Health Commis- sion which found her sane. Miss Jones had been secretary Sol Estcs case. Williams made the assertion in employe who has asserted Senate speech, declaring thcithere was favoritism given woman, Miss Mo'-y Kimbrough Jones, was guilty of nothing "other than refusing to cooperate in covering up corruption" in that agency. He. .demanded an investigation by Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy who, the senator charged, "has displayed an appalling lack oC in-l tsrcst in the whole Estes case." of N. Battle Hales, a department that 'o big Estes, Texas financier with dealings in cotton, grain-storing nhtl fertilizer. In reply to Williams, the Agri- culture Department issued a state- ment which officials said spoke both for the department and Dr. Buchanan. The statement snld: "The Department of Agriculture Miss Jones wns taken to Dis-j regrets that the medical prob rlct General Hospital April 25 at Icms of an employe hnve been the request of Dr. tee K, made into a controversy. in, chief of ;he health division of the Agriculture per- sonnel office. She was discharged May "The woman, Mary K. Jonex, was taken to D.C, General Hos- pital on April M on the advice of two physicians, wai her own personal physician and the other was the doctor assigned to the department. The department's physician accompanied her to the hospital." In reply to Williams, the Agri- culture Department issued a statement which officials said spoke both for the departmenl and Dr. Buchanan. The statement said: "The Department of Agriculture regrets that the medical problems of an employe have been made into a political controversy. "The woman, Mary K. Jones, was tnken to D.C. General Hospi- tal on April 23 on the advice of two physicians. One wa.1 her own personal physician and the other wns the doctor assigned to the department. The physician accompanied her to the losnllal." The department later added to its statement: "The department'a doctor acted Pf. 2-A, Cel. 1 Thailand had agreed to allow re nforcement of U.S. troops on its soil to check any Red aggression across the Laotian border. Kennedy has ordered land, sea and air forces to waters near the rattle area of Laos and South Viet Nam. U.S. troops reportedly will land in Thailand on a stand- by basis, perhaps starting Tues- day. Vice President Lyndon B. John- son, Senate and House leaders ol both parties and ranking members of the Foreign Relations anc Armed Services committees have been asked to attend the White House conference. Arrangements for (he meeting were made late Monday as Ken nedy considered next steps in the Laotian crisis. Originally, the Whita House had announced Kennedy would hold his usual Tuesday breakfast meeting with Democratic congressional leaders Tuesday morning. That session was put off until Wednes- day to make way for the bipar- tisan huddle. Kennedy last met with a bi- partisan delegation from the Cap- itol in advance of the present con- gressional session. His latest White House confer- ence with such a group in urgent circumstances occurred last year n connection with the resumption of Soviet nuclear twit in the at- moipntre. licolhe in 1938. They lived in Breckenridge since that time. Mr Gandy had been an oilfield work- er and carpenter and had been mployed by the Gibralter Con- struction Co. since last August. funeral will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday in Rose Ave. Baptist Church with the fiev. Lulher Hig- ginbotham, pastor, the Rev. I. C. [lull of Weatherford, and the Rev. R. E. Wright of Midland officiating. Burial in Breckenridge Cemetery will be directed by Melton Funeral Home. Surviving are his wife: one daughter, Mrs. E. F. Digiacomo of Hialeah, Fla.: one son, R. G of Arlington: his mother. Mrs Nannie B. of Luhbock; one sister Mrs. S. D. Bobbins of Pampa; brothers, Herbert of Hillsboro Rozelle of Meridian, M. C. anr1 Elrec, both of Talum. N.M., Et mer of El Pnso, and Billy of Kil cen; and five grandchildren. One daughter preceded him in death the 10 a.m. meeting in the Wind- sor Hotel. However, J. Ed Connally of Abi- lene, SDEC chairman, said Mon- day night that he does not antici- pate any contests over the nam- the Windsor Hotel ballroom, said he has made no decision on whether he will seek to retain the SDEC chairmanship at tht state convention. "I don't think that now is the time to be discussing it. I just have no plans on Connally said. NEWS INDEX SiCTION A Sportt Oil MWl SECTION WMIHH'I ntwi T ti Mto-TV tatt turn newt, nMrkefi M PO Pact Is Awarde By LESLIE CARPENTER Reporter-News Capital Bureau WASHINGTON A contract for extending and moc ernizing the federal building in Abilene was awarded Monday ti J. W. Cooper Construction Co. Inc., of Odessa, Rep. Omar Burl eson of Anson was '.nformed b; the General Services Administra lion. GSA said there were nine bids No exact date has been set for starting said. construction, officials The old federal building will be removed to make way for part of the extension to the prtsent feder nl building. When completed, it wiil provide postmen with three imcs as much space as they now lave. The one Mory huikling and mcnt addition will enltnd th< pres- ent buHdJin north, nuth MM) old and new construction will be removed to make large work area for postal work- ers. The lobby of the post will be divided into two with a glass partition. The area containing lock 'ill be changed to make twojje- cesscd sections for 428 additioMi boxes and 60 more drawers. On other half of the lobby will Cfld- tain open counter space, pro a much larscr working an Walls between the oflices used by the postmaster tant postmaster will be n provide one inuU arge office wliere the i section, now hound to the 1 ment, will be lorttcd. he postmaster, auutant er and will be fe ttt west corner MIT   

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