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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 12, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               LAFEST SPORTS t eget or "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR sviiw VORLD EXACTLY AS IT YEAR, NO. 329 ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MORNING, 03 saive ;R PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS 33IAM3S W1IJOHDIN Prew TRIBUTES PAID DUKlNo JMBLEWEED DAYS Cong. Mahon King for a Day' By KATHARYN DUFF Reporter-News Assistant Editor COLORADO CITY A homefolk and Washington officials took turns here Friday telling George Mahon their views of him and of his 28 years service in national Congress. And the tributes were pretty well summed up. by retired Dis- trict Judge A. S. Mauzey, Ma- hon's "political in these words: and freedom of the nation than has George said Cong, dozen Harold Ostertag, Republican from New York. Most Important Mahon heads "the most impor- mt committee, in my view, in the said Cong. Melvin Laird, Republican from Wiscon- sin. That committee, the one which appropriates defense mon- "handles 49 billion dollars of your tax Laird noted. the tai TEXANS Among the loyal Texans who got together Friday at Colorada during George Mahon Day were the honoree himself, left, and John Connal- former U.S. Navy secretary and Democratic candidate for governor of Texas. by Henry Wolff Jr.) BIG HAT FOR BIG MAN Air Force Secretary Eugene M. Zuckert, left, came from Washington, D. C., to join Friday in paying tribute to Cong. George Mahon. He went home with a real Texas hat pre sented at the luncheon by Joe Bell, editor of the Colorado Gity Record. 'Harmony' is Watchword For Conventions Today The. watchword will be "har- mony" today as Taylor County Republicans and Democrats hold their county conventions this aft- ernoon ifi the 42nd District court- room with both organizations malting greater efforts towards harmony in their delegations to the state conventions. The GOP will hold its county meet on the third floor of the courthouse at p.m., and it is expected that Gordon Asbury, candidate for county judge on the Republican ticket, will be named chairman of the Taylor County Republican Convention. At least, name is being mentioned imffe than any other at this time. The GOP resolutions committee, of Which Dick Elam is chairman, met Friday noon and Republican Coiinty Chairman Phil Bridges MM it no doubt will offer to the convention resolutions "praising John Tower and condemning President Kennedy." With Jack Cox of MfrfiviBC a majority of votes IB Taylor County, it ii anticipated 211 delegate in ly convention will be harmo- _j In pausing resolutions nam- 'delegotes to their rtate con- The Taylor County Re- i are entitled to M I atato convention to htW Wflftk (UwDfmo- posal to Mme a co-chairman at today's Demo convention at 2 p.m. in the 42nd. District court- room. There probably will be co-chair- men for what is usually the coun- ty chairman's post, and there may bev co-chairmen in commit- tee assignments, Virgil Musick, one of the Democratic leaders who attended a political confer- ence in the city this week, said Friday. He indicated that an effort will be made to see that "all factions of the Democratic Party" are represented on the various com- mittees and other official party positions at the county conven- tions. Musick is convinced today's convention will be harmonious and pointed out that all precinct conventions last Saturday were peaceful. "There wasn't a single rump convention held in the pre- cincts this he added. Taking part in some of the con- ferences this week have been Bill Sentcr, Dusty Rhodes, Tom Gor- don, Maurice Brooks, Cairoi! Kay Rogers, C. G. Whittcn and Mu- sick. Democratic delegctM In convention today will select M county's strength in the state and M io El Pmn mettini, which to lo be held An indication thai Taylor Coun- ty's delegation will be in the John Connally column may be seen in the number of votes cast for the two men at last Saturday's pri- mary. Connally received votes, while Yarborough received Marshall Formby ,led the Democratic ticket with votes. Musick says the proposed list of delegates lo the state con- vention consists mostly of Con- nally supporters. Three changes in the list of Democratic precinct chairmen in Taylor County were announced Friday by Tom Webb, county chairman of the Democratic ecutive Committee. John Womble has withdrawn from a possible run-off election for chairman of Precinct 6 and Bill Charlton has been appointed to that post. Names of both men were written in at last Saturday's Democratic primary. Jcffic Lee Slcgncr was elected chairman of Precinct 21 and a chairman is to be named in Pre- cinct 16, which docs not now have a chairman, Webb said. Meanwhile, Taylor County Cierk Mra. Chester Htitchewn announc- ed that absentee voting for the Jwe S primary runoff wfll open Monday, and ballot re- iMta be filed by null if in Mn at her office. The absentee bsllots may be Mtt M, "George, you are the salt of the earth. "And you have not lost your savor." Some 375 persons from far and near gathered at the Civic House to take part in the Mahon Appre- ciation Luncheon, a feature of Colorado City's Tumbteweed Fes- tival. Through the two hours of trib- utes Mahon and his wife, Helen, beamed with pleasure and dis- played smiles that xvere alternate- ly shy, at the more lavish words, and delighted, at the ribbing some homefolk dished out. Air Force Secretary Eugene Zuckert headed a Washington del- egation which flew to Texas to take part in the tribute to Mahon. Three multi starred Lt. Gen. James E. Briggs. com- mander of the Air Training Com- mand at San Antonio; Maj. Gen. Jack Merrell, director of the Air Force budget; and Maj. Gen. Glen Martin, military assistant to Secretary Zuckert and a varie- ty of other hieh ranking Air Force officers from various Tex- as bases were present. There were telegranhed trib- utes from President John F. Ken- nedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. Former Navy Secre- tary John Connally, now a candi date for governor of Texas, was a guest. Secretary Zuekert was the luncheon's principal speaker, but before he took the floor to praise Mahon's foresightedness and per- serverence in building this na- tion's defense system, a proces- sion of Mitchell Countians said their welcomes and their thank- yous to the congressman who has represented them since 1934. Leads Tributes Charles C. Thompson, C City hanker and lawyer and a mem- ber with Mahon in the Loraine High Class of 1918, was master of ceremonies. B. L. Templeton, Stephenville lawyer and another of the Loraine Class of '18, led off the tributes, followed by Dr. Bruce Johnson, mayor of Loraine; H. I. Berman, mayor of Colorado City; E. A. Oaeisby, mayor of Westbrook: Elmer Martin, Martin County Judge; Mauzey of Sweetwater and Robert Whipkey, publisher of the Big Spring Herald, Whipkey gave Mahon his first big laugh of the luncheon when, following other glowing words, he turned to the black haired con- gressman and said, "George, you can't be all that Bi-partisan congressional trib- utes to Mahon, chairman of the House Defense Appropriation Sub- committee, were brought by four House members who flew to Tex- as in the official party. Cong. Bob Poage, Democrat from Waco, praised Mahon for keeping his place in the hearts of the home communities while he war gaining national prominence. "I know of no one who has contributed more to the strength Additional photos, story Pgs. 11-A, 1-B Graham Purcell, freshman Democratic congressman from Wichita Falls, praised Mahon for the help he gives new lawmak- ers and he noted "the best avail- able evidence of Cong, leadership ability" could be found in the passage a few weeks ago of the defense spending bill. The measure, drafted by Mahon's committee and guided by Mahon through the House, was passed without a single item changed, without a single amendment. 'Visionary' would be a fancy word to use for a man of George Mahon's Secretary Mahon's Zuckert said. "But, use the word or not, Cong. Mahon is a man of great foresight." And he gave in- stances of Mahon's demands that the most defense be purchased toe the least tax money. Zuckert said he is one who mint undergo Mahon questioning about defense spending and "I know is interested in reducing "Our defense problem is geo- graphically global, scientifically without precedent and ideological- ly without Zuckert said. "We mean to accomplish It See MAHON, Pg. 9-A, Col. 1 Holleman Quits Over Estes 'Gift' U.S. Naval Use In Laos Is Considered WEATHER IT. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WEATHER BUREAU (Weather Map, PBRC 3-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (Radius 40 mites) Clear to partly cloudy and continued warm Saturday and Sunday, igh both days 95, Low 65. NORTH CENTRAL, NORTHEAST TEX- AS Clear lo partly cloudy and warm WASHINGTON Kennedy was reported Friday night to be planning action to strengthen. U.S. military power in the area of Southeast Asia to meetl the threat posed by the new cri- sis in Laos. It is understood that the plans may result in the dispatch of U.S. naval forces into the area in the next day or so. The President and his advisors are concerned about the forward thrust of Com- munist-supported Pathet Lao reb- els against the collapsing resist- ance of pro-Western government troops. The White House announced that .he President will meet Saturday morning with Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara and Gen. ,yman L. Lemnitzer, chairman of the Joint Chiefs .of Staff. All three men returned tonight from trips around fhe world, including visits by McNamara and Lemnitzer to Southeast Asia. In a full-scale review of the Laos situation and related prob- lems of bolstering anti-Commu- nist defenses elsewhere in South- east Asia, Kennedy is understood to have reopened this week the question of possible U.S. military intervention in Laos. But more urgent consideration now is understood to have been 'en to measures for reestablish- ing the presence of substantial U.S. power in the general area. The United States is hopeful of 79 84 Hish and low for 23-hours ending 9 m.: 92 and 66. HiEh anil low same date last year: 92 and Sunset last nielli: sunrise today: sunset tonight: Barometer reading at 9 p.m.: 2805. Humidity at 9 p.m.: 46 per cent. Man Killed In Collision restoring some stability in the strategic little Southeast Asia kingdom. The U.S. position Is that it would still like to see the restora- tion of a cease-fire and the forma- tion of a coalition neutral govern- ment under Phouma. Prince Souvanna Yarborough First On Demo Ballot Positions of candidates on the Taylor County Democratic ballot for the June 2 primary were de- termined Friday, according to Tom Webb, county Democratic chairman. In the governor's race, Don Yarborough of Harris County will appear first on the ballot followed by John Connally of Tarrant County. Preston Smith of Lubbock Coun- ty will precede James A. (Jim- my) Turman in the lieutenant governor's section of the ballot. Tom Reavtey of Travis County will precede the other candidate for attorney general, Waggoner Carr of LubWk County. In the confremman at large race, Woodrow Wilson Bean of E) Pato County will precede Joe Pool of County. Truett UUmr Taylor Coun ty will appear flm on ballot In the race for State Senator for tht Mth DIXrict and David Rat- Uff of ONMy wlfl tative, 84th District, Don Norris will precede Raleigh Brown. Some clarification also was of- fered Friday concerning the con- fusion resulting over write. in candidates for positions not listed on the ballot in the May 5 pri- mary. Webb said that only those posi- tions were listed on the ballot (or which candidates had filed. "The trouble was (hat some positions were open, but did not draw any said Webb. One such write-in campaign ex- isted in voting precincts 32, 33, 35 and 36 for the position of con- stable of Precinct 6, a position not listed on the ballot of May S. In tho write-in campaign, Oris Barbee received M> votes and William Mills M Both names will appear on June 1 ballot, with flnt One other write- in lor coMtabk of Precinct 0. W. Shofw, racvfovo 46 votw. another awN cam- and Sunday. High Saturday 86- "JJORTHWEST TEXAS Clear to part- t cloudy and warm Saturday and Sun- day. Hiah Saturday 92-100. SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS Clear to partly cloudy and warm Saturday and Sunday. High Saturday 85-35. SOUTHEAST TEXAS Clear to part- y cloudy aiiti warm Saturday and Sun- lay. Hieh Saturday 80-87. SOUTHWEST TEXAS Clear to part- Cloudy and warm Saturday and Sun- ny. High Saturday in 90s. TEMPERATURES Fri. a.m. Fri. p.m, 74 8B 74..........., B9 3: CO TO 63 92 68............ 90 G8 ____....... m Official Admits Taking I have been having in meeting my personal expenses on my gov- ernment Holleman said. "He offered to help me out by a persona! gift. I accepted this A federal grand jury has in- dicted Estes, 37, for fraud in con- Walter W. Kater, 51, of was killed in a grinding two-car collision two and one half miles Photo Pg. 9-A Related stories, Pg, 11-A WASHINGTON Sec- retary of Labor Jerry R. Holle- man resigned his post Friday night, saying he ac- cepted a gift from indicted Texas financier Billie Sol Estes to help make ends meet. Holleman said in a letter to President Kennedy that Estes has been a close personal friend for 10 years. "Last- January in the course of a personal conversation with Mr. Estes, I referred to the difficulties launch within a month publie' nection with chattel mortgages he- was charged with selling on non-: existent fertilizer tanks. The Agriculture Department has canceled his 1961 marketing allot- ments and levied in mar- keting penalties against him for alleged illegal, dealings in cotton acreage allotments. Senate investigators hope to! ing south on FM 1193 when hearings on Estes and his ings with government officials. The Senate Investigations subcom- mittee, headed by Sen. John McClellan, D-Ark., seeks to learn whether influence in Washington helped Estes run up a fortune un- der the government's farm pro- gram. Secretary of Labor Arthur J. Goldberg accepted the resignation and said Holleman had done the right thing in quitting. "It is regrettable that this has Goldberg said. "Un- der the circumstances, Mr. Holle- man has taken the proper course of action." Holleman is the first high Kennedy administration official tainted by the spreading Estes lease. However, Emery Jacobs, def> north of Abilene on FM 1193 about !Was in collision with the automo-juty administrator of the depart- Friday night. Two other persons were criti- cally injured and a third injured seriously. Kater, whose last known arl-i dress was listed as 1709 Burnett St., Waco, was pronounced dead on arrival at Hendrick Memorial Hospital after his body was (reed from Ihe car in which he had been a passenger. The driver of the car in which Kater was riding was Henry Eben Hayes, 62, of 1410 Stella St., Dal- las, who was listed as "critical" at Hendrick Hospital. The driver of Ihe second car, Douglas Wayne Todd. 19, a sopho- more at Hardin Simmons Uni- versity from Plains, was describ- ed as in "serious" condition by hospital attendants. Janice LaRue. Naylor, 17, pas- senger in Ihe car driven by Todd, was in critical condition at the hospital. Miss Naylor's address was given as 2142 S. Willis St., Abilene. Officer E J. Terrell of the De- partment of Public Safety, who in- vestigated the accident, said that the car driven by Hayes was go- bile driven by Todd going north. Agricultural Stabilization Service, has resigned with a de- Officers at the scene of the of receivjng fom crash theorized that Hayes' ve- hicle had skidded sideways in the roadway and was struck in the right side by the car driven by Todd. The grinding crash scattered glass over a 75 foot area of the road and totally destroyed both vehicles. Funeral arrangements for Kater are pending at Elliott's Funeral Home. Rater's only known survivors Friday night'were his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Kater of Route 5, Newton, Kansas. Estes. William E. Morris, an AgricttS? ture Department official, was fired after his name cropped up in a Texas investigation of Estes' affairs. And, Secretary of Agri- culture Orville L. Freeman -is considering the case of James T. Ralph, a former assistant secre- tary whose name also has been linked with Estes. Holleman's letter was delivered to Kennedy Friday night. In It Holleman said he accepted the See ESTES, Pg. 9-A, Col. 3 NEWS INDEX SECTION A Obituaries 4 Sports 6-8 Oil news............. 10 SECTION B Church newt 2 Women's news.......... 3 EJItorifls 4 Amusvnwnts............ 5 Comics 7 R.dio-TV 10 Quit ...........'10 Farm MWI, Gtts Prison Tt rm MIAMI, Ha. (At't -Murray Sadler, aon-in-law of industrUl- M Bernard Goktfine, drew a one- year prison sentence Friday en convMton of cwnta ef ISMIM i i Entertaining, Informative Reading in Your Sunday Copy of We Visit Sweetwater Take a trip with us to Nolan County and Sweet- water. Staff Writer Norman Fisher tells of its schools, government, civic pride, economy. A Mother's Varied Roles will be portrayed on the cover page of Women's Section in a picture story of mothers and their children. Teenage Fashion Advice Teenage girls get advice on fashion from auth- orities on the subject twnage in Young Outlook Sunday. Complete County by County RtMifa....!   

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