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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 5, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 5, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               SPORTS "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS 81STYEAR, NO. 322 ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY OT mil t mvo 3AV 3109 9909 xe 'OUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron WENTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Jury Verdict Favors impact; Ruling Awaited Appeal Is Considered Almost Sure Immct-stiO in the toddtin stage took another step toward uncontested existence Friday 42nd District Court. The step came with a jury verdict favoring the 47-acre city just north .of Abilene. The verdic ended three days of a quo war ranto trial attacking validity Impact's A judgment on the veridct still to come from District Judge J R. Black, who without commit ting himself on how he woulc ultimately rule, said he expect to enter a judgment as soon a: jt is prepared. He pointed out the verdict is still subject to motions from plaintiff attorneys. Judge Black's anticipation of a motion from plaintiff attorneys proved correct less than two hours after the ruling was an nounced. Attorneys representing plaintiffs issued a joint state ment shortly after 4 p.m. saying they will ask a favorable judg metn .'.not withstanding the jury verdict. It is customary for the attorney favored in the jury verdict t l 9 p.m.: HomMlty i p.m.: 45 per WASHINGTON sub Activities Control Board ound Friday that the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers is a Communist-infil- rated organization, and therefore neligible to represent employes under the National tabor Rela- ions Act. The board's determination, out ined in a 97-page report, upheld he findings of Francis A. Cherry, a board member who had sat as in examiner in the case. "It is quite clear from the evi- lence that many important func- bctter Saturday morning, "Iitionaries of respondent (the union) 'are and have been members the Communist party, and that other important functionaries are wouldn't be surprised if he didn'l try to go to Plainview" (Marshall Formby's home town) to hear the primary results. Marshall Formby told news- men: "I'm just thankful they are alive. Nothing else is important, you know, when something like this happens." Mrs. Forniby probably will be transferred to a Plainview huspi- tal within the next low days if her condition allows, the family spokesman said. The injured woman was able to talk to officers briefly at the Sec FORMBY, PR. 2-A, Col. 4 persons who are and have been amenable to the Communist par- the five-member board said. The board was set up and loyalist forces and rebels were ates under the 1950 Internal Se-mghung i: Carupano with many but had not yef reached the city Earlier reports that they had a ready moved in to crush the up rising were premature, the off cials said. Palace officials said the revol was part of a movement by th Communist party and other lefi ists to overthrow the governmen of President Romulo Betancourt, backer of the U.S. Alliance to Progress program. He has taker a strong stand against the Cuba: regime of Prime Minister Fide Castro. A presidential palace sourc said the air force abandoned plan to bomb the rebels in the barrack areas because they had taken u positions in a midcity high school He said the marines were passing out arms to Communists and ti members of the Movement of thi Revolutionary He sail the rebels also had occupied gov ernment buildings there. The pro-Castro MIR and Com munists have been taking part ii guerrilla and terrorist activity ii the past few months. Official said large numbers of them ar university students. The presidential source sai loyalist forces were approaching Carupano by three roads from Cu mana, Ciudad Bolivar and Matur in. Marines flown in air force planes from Caracas' Maiquetia Airport were advancing from Cu mana.while army forces movcf from the other two points, the source said. The palace version contradictei radio reports from Cumana tha curity Act. Cherry had heard evidence in the Mine, Mill and Smelter Wort ere case for more than four years up to May 17, 1961. He had hearc nearly 150 witnesses and viewed more than 300 exhibits in pro- ceedings logged in pages of transcript. casualties. The broadcast also re ported suppression of extremis demonstrations in Cumana in sup port of the revolt. FORMBY AUTO AFTER children thrown through windihleld Atlas Silo Blaze in Oklahoma Sends Three to Hospital RUSSELL, Okla. construction workers were injured Friday when fire swepi an Atlas missile silo being ouilt to guard a Strategic Air Force base. An Air Force spokesman saic the fire was brought under control and all others working in the deep hole in southwestern Okla- homa escaped injury. The three taken to a hospiti at Mangum were treated foi smoke inhalation. The fire broke out after a line ruptured in the hydraulic actua- tor door control at Ihe lop of the silo. The silo is still under construc- tion and there was no missile in it. The hospital at Mangum identi- fied those treated as Gerald Floyd, Clyde Jones and Alan For- tune, all of Mangum. The three reportedly were in the bottom of the hole when the fire broke out. All others working in it apparently scrambled to safety before the thick smoke engulfed them. NEWS INDEX SKTION A MO Obltuarta 11 Oil MWI.............. 12 SiCTION I Church ntwi............ 2 3 CoJiki 7 EdrWMlt 11 tow.......... TVStMf..............II 12 ANN HALL in AAAA event UIL FIRSTS Abilenian, Winters Youth Win Ann Hall, daughter of Mr? am Mrs. Elbert Hall of 1415 Tangle wood Dr., carried home top aurels for Cooper High Schoo, and Collier Randolph, son of Mr. and Mrs, James Randolph, did ikewise for Winters High School in the University Inter- scholastic League competition at Austin. Miss Hall, a Cooper senior, won first place in Class AAAA girls' prose reading, using the late James Thurber's "The Night the Ghosts Came for her seiec- ,on. Randolph, a senior at Winters iigh, won first in the Class AA boys' prose reading contest. Results of other contests in ivhich area students were com- peting were not known late Fri- day night. An Abilene High School senior stude.it. Ernest Hermann, is scheduled to compete in the UIL science contest Saturday morn- ng. Hermann, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Joseph Hermann of 458 Woodland Trail, and Miss Jail are the only two entrants rom Abilene in the state meet. Both students were district and winners in their cate- Exchanges t Frequent j In Hearing By LEWIS HAWKINS I WASHINGTON agri4 culture Department employs ac-; cused superiors Friday of shawmJ- "the equivalent of favoritism" indicted Texas financier BiQie Estes. One of those named im- mediately denied doing so. The did not include any charge of corruptioaf made by N. Battle until recently a staff assistant to: luty administrator of Agriculture Stabilization and too-: servation Service. The ASCS bad; extensive dealings with Estes, Pecos Democrat under indict- ment on fraud charges. Hales' claim on favoritism wa< denied by the service's adminis- trator, Horace D. Godfrey Hales, in turn, was accused of reftia'nf to tell the FBI whether he had relayed information on the Estet case to unauthorized persons out- side the department. The charges and charges were aired in 31 i-hour news conference that was set up by Thomas R. Hughta, executive assistant to Secretary of Agriculture Orville L. Free- man. It was marked by frequent sharp exchanges between Hatai and Godfrey, The statements, questions arid answers ranged over many of the tangled affairs of Estes, 37, rose spectacularly to great wealth. But the conference cen- tered mainly on a transaction ia which Estes obtained of acres of cotton-acreage allot- ments in 1961. At one point Godfrey accused Hales of lying when he quoted Godfrey as saying he Knew and doubted the Texan would be guilty of wrongdoing in connection with the cotton allotment. Godfrey was supported by two other department officiate who :old newsmen they had heard Godfrey make no such statement at the meeting in which Halei .said they were made. The department has canceled Estes' cotton allotments and hat moved to collect in mark- eting quota penalties. But said the fact that the department See ESTES, Pg. 2-A, Col. 1 Don't Miss Sunday's Big Election Special Central West Texas, Most Complete Returns of Local, District and State Races Box by Box County by County Cast Your Vote Early: Polls Open Here at 7 a.i   

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