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Abilene Reporter News: Saturday, April 7, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 7, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               LATEST SPORTS ggg C96T OT H38VW 81ST YEAR, NO. 294 "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH ____________; ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY 7, SAV 3io3 CLY AS IT 9908 X9 03 831VS ________________ HTUOH3IW AGES IN TWO SECTIONS (ff) Estes Associate Goes Bankrupt LUBBOCK, Tex. (AP) -Cole- man McSpadden, charged in the widening Billie Sol Estes fraud case, went bankrupt Friday. He filed a petition with federal bankruptcy referee Frank R. Murray. But McSpadden refused to list his assets and liabilities, declaring such a list might be used against him in criminal pro- His assets are estimated at million and his debts at mil lion, the Lubbock Avalanche- Journal said. A new mystery arose at El Paso in the death of George Kruti- lek, a bookkeeper who worked on tome of the Estes accounts. Midland's Play Wins In 2-AAAA Midland High School won first place in the one-act play compe- tition Friday night, opening event in the two-day District 2-AAAA University Interscholastic League Spring Meet in Abilene. Cooper High School's play placed second with Abilene High School ending in a tie for third place with Odessa. Abilene High and Cooper High together took four of the six "best" actor and actress awards. Floyd Girtz and Bill Thornton df AHS shared "best actor" honors with Woody Gyn of Midland High. Pat Workman and Ginger Miles, both of Cooper High, shared the top actress honor with Gayle Gut- ty of Odessa High. Other literary events will be held Saturday, mostly at AHS, but shorthand and typing will be held at Cooper. Winners will be announced Saturday afternoon, said Abilene High Principal Es- coe Webb, director general of the meet. Athletic events will be held Saturday. See Pg. 6-A, 8-A. Midland High's production of "The Taming of the Shrew" was directed by Verna Harris. George Sorenson directed Cooper High's "The Miracle Worker." Ernest Sublet! of Abilene High School di- rected the production of "J.B." which tied for third place with Odessa High's production of "Saint directed by Lee Holloway. Judges for the play competition Included Dr. Lewis Fulks of Abi- lene Christian College, Dr. Tom Abbott of Baylor and Dr. Alex Reeve of Howard Payne. NEWS INDEX SECTION A Obituaries 5 Sports 6-8 Oil ncwi 10 SECTION B Bridge 2 Church ntwi 2 Wom.n'i news.......... 3 Editorial] 4 Amusements............ S Comics 6, 7 Rodio-TV log.......... 19 TV Scout 10 Form markets......11 Related Story on Pg. 3-A Late Friday night, it was an- nounced in El Paso that the coun- ty pathologist determined that George Krutilek died of a heart attack after apparently preparing! for suicide. Krutilek was a bookkeeper who handled several accounts connect ed with the Estes case. His body was found in his car Wednesda; northeast of Clint. A hose ha< been connected to the exhaus pipe through a rear window. "Police said they also fount empty sleeping pill bottles in the automobile. However, Dr. Frederick Born stein, the county pathologist, ad vised Sheriff Bob Bailey of E Paso County that Krutilefc died o a coronary thrombosis. Bornstein said there was no sign of violence Bailey said the end of the plas tic hose inserted in the exhaus pipe melted and fell out. The ca ignition was on and the gas tan: empty when discovered by a rancher. Krutilek had been questioned by authorities in connection wit! his books for a number of Wes Texas farmers involved in the Estes operations. Sheriff Bailey said Krutilek las was seen coming out of his office in Fabens late Monday. The de- composed1 condition of the body when discovered made the autop- sy difficult, Dr. Bornstein said. McSpadden, Estes, Harold Orr of Amarillo and Ruel Alexander of Amarillo were indicted Thurs day by an El Paso federal grand jury in what the jury said was million fraud plot. The indictment listed nine -fi nance companies based from coast to coast as being bilked by the four men through issuance o mortgages secured by anhydrous ammonia fertilizer tanks which never existed. McSpadden earlier had offered to turn his extensive assets over to the lending companies but no action was taken, one of the fi nance company representatives said. The bankruptcy petition states that McSpadden did not list his assets and liabilities .because ol [ear they "might tend to incrimi hate him or be used against him in any way in any criminal pro- ceeding." E. H. Nelson, McSpadden's at- torney, said he will take the re ceiver to all of McSpadden's hold ings, introduce him to the man agers-and let the receiver take the next action. McSpadden owns grain storage and fertilizer operations in Lub- bock, Hereford, Lariat, Muleshoe Lazbuddie, Friona, Earth, Hub and New Deal. Representatives of lending com- panies meeting here this week to discuss their next moves broke up their sessions Thursday without any publicly announced action. Estes, 37, called the world's king of anhydrous ammonia dis- tribution and No. 1 grain storage operator in Texas, already faces about million in suits as a re- sult of his mortgage operations. flHtae check list for your Sunday reading pleasure Go to Ranger With Us! Staff Writer Norman Fisher us on a visit Ranger in Sunday's Reporter-News. In pictures and stories he tells us the Eaallanrl county city doing in government, ichooli, and civic accomplishments. if Teenagers and the Movies High school stilrlenls from Abilene and Cooper highs give their views on "Movies and Censorship" in the Sun- day Women1! Section the first of series of interviews' with Abilene teenagers. if Nurses Convention Abilene will Welcome 800 graduate and student nursei next week for slate conventions of the two organizations. Plain for the program and social events will be announced Sunday on the cover page of the Women's. Section. Reading An Ahilenlan who It encouraging students In develop enjoy the "reading dibit" will be featured in I profile Sunday. if THDA Meeting Speakers mil program for the' District VII, Texas Demonstration Association, meeting In Abilene Thursday will be annoonrurl in The Women's Section and spring bathing fashion plncres lor amn-to-be-wurm May. pliu' lots of track. btsMba.ll, golf Rusk Sees Early Frogmen Return AMONG THE MISSING Mike Freeman, 37, under- water photographer and owner of a skin diving equip- ment store in Washington, D. C., is among the seven missing American treasure hunters reportedly Being held in Cuba. (AP Wirephoto) Panhandle Is Hit By Heavy Snows By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Heavy snow fell in the Pan- handle Friday as a spring north- er whistled south through Texas, kicking up thunderstorms and billows of-grimy dust. Very heavy snow with large flakes started falling at about 1 p.m. at Dumas, 47 miles north of Amarillo. the temperature was 34 degrees, 2 above freezing, A brisk 25 mile wind out of the north blew Hie snow along, making visibility poor. The snow fell at Dumas for about an hour and then turned ihto light rain. The snowflakes stuck to fence .posts and auto- mobiles but melted when it hit the ground. Welcome moisture spread over wide areas of the state, but amounts of rain generally were small. Showers, heaviest from the Pecos Valley southeastward, were due to spread during the evening as the colder air tumbled down from the northwest. A wide strip of Southwest and South Central Texas was under a severe thunderstorm forecast for 6 hours ending at 6 p.m. The 120 mile belt was centered along a line from Victoria to a point 50 miles east of Fort Stockton. San Antonio, Victoria, New die. Near Uvalde, a thunderstorm with high winds.and driving rain moved in on Rio Frio. Light rain fell at San Angelo, Wink, Midland, Dalhart and Ama- rillo. El Paso had blowing dust that, cut visibility to four miles. Strong north winds pushed the temperatures into the low 40s by early afternoon at Amarillo and Dalhart. Winds gusted up to 40 miles. At Lubbock flie winds were out of the north-northwest at 38 miles an hour. Nearly all Texas skies were cloudy. The northern half of the state was unseasonably cool and the southern half generally was Braunfels, Gonzales, San Marcos, Beeville, Seguin, Hondo, Uvalde, Kerrville, Junction and Fredericksburg all were in the zone which the weather bureau said was threatened with "a few severe thunderstorms with large hail and strong gusty winds." Right at the fringe of the area were Austin, Corpus Christi, San Angelo and Del Rio. Even before the severe thun- derstorm forecast was issued, thunderstorms were booming in the Big Spring area of West Texas. Several south plains areas were pounded by destructive hail before dawn. Thunderstorms were in prog- by early afternoon at Junc- tion and at Childress, at the southeast corner of the Panhan- ACC Man's Wife Dies In Smashup The wife of an Abilene Christian College sophomore was killel and he was injured Thursday night in a Bosque County traffic accident, il Was learned here Friday. Kilied was Mrs. Michael Smith- son, 20. She and her husband lived in Barracks 9 on the ACC campus. Smithson, who was driving the auto when it struck a parked and loaded grain track, was taken to a hospital at Meridian and later was transferred to a Waco hos- pital. He was reported in satisfac- tory condition Friday night. The Smithsons moved from Waco to Abilene about 15 months ago, according to a campus spokesman. Smithson is majoring in agriculture. Highway Patrolman James A. Wright, who investigated the crash, said it happened about p.m. near Iredell on State Highway 6. Ecuador Revolution Attack Is Launched QUITO, Ecuador youth organization trained in Castro- style revolution has launched an uprising against President Carlos Arosemena's regime in north-cen- tral Ecuador, the government said Friday. The armed forces declared a state of emergency in the area- Santo Domingo de los Colorado? rushed in reinforcements to combat the revolt. Newspaper reports said at least one soldier lias been killed and several persons were wounded. Authorities said the area has been in "an abnormal situation" since the government broke dip- lomatic relations with Prime Min- ister Fidel Castro's Cuban regime and with Communist Poland and Ctechoslovakla four days ago. Santo Domingo de kxt del, 48 miles west of Quito, in The insurgents were described as members of the pro-Castro Revolutionary Union of Ecuadori- an Youth. Part of the member- ship has received military and Friday night, guerrilla training in Cuba, in- formants said. Interior Minister Alfredo Al borrioz declined to give any de- tails of the fighting or to com- ment on unconfirmed reports of similar uprisings in the Qucvedo area in west-central Ecuador The diplomatic break with Cuba was forced by the Ecuadorean army, which also pressured Aroscmena into reorganizing his Cabinet and sheading left-leaning policies. Following the action, Castro in Cuba called Aroscmena a drunken coward and predicted a fate for RULE Soviets Put New Sputnik Into Orbit MOSCOW Soviet Un- ion announced Friday night that it has put another Sputnik into second in three weeks that it is orbiting the earth close to its calculated path. An announcement by the official news agency Tass listed the tasks of instruments aboard, but said nothing about a cosmonaut, indi- cating the new satellite was un- manned. The vehicle, named Cosmos It, followed Cosmos I, launched March 16, and apparently was in a similar plane. The two launch- ings followed a long period of So- viet inactivity in space, so far as is known. Tass said Cosmos II passed over New York at a.m. East- ern Standard Time, and over Los Angeles at a.m., and was making an orbit every 102.5 min- utes. It is circling the earth at a dis- tance of 975 miles at its apogee, or greatest distance, and 132 miles at its perigee, or nearest distance, and is in a plane 49 de- grees from the earth's equator. Its short-wave transmitter, the announcement said, is operating on 20.005 and 90.0225 megacycles, and data received so far indicates all systems are functioning nor- mally. A communique gave no infor- mation on the weight or shape of the latest satellite. One of the objectives of the new Sputnik, Tass said, is to check and mprove "elements of space ve- licle construction." Other objectives listed were the investigation of radio transmis- radiation belts around the earth, and the magnetic field of :he earth and the distribution and of cloud systems in the earth's atmosphere. New Rains Pelt Area Those April showers have come our way, and farmers are mighty happy about it. For the third consecutive day small amounts of rainfall con- tinued to saturate the moistened earth just at the time the plow- ng season was under way. The rains varied from a half nch at Munday and Rule to a trace in Abilene. However it started raining again in Abilene ate Friday night. Max Durrett', weather bureau echnician at Abilene's Municipal Airport, said the same cold'.front hat surprised Amarillo with heavy snowfall early Friday drop- jed temperatures in the Abilene area only four degrees as the eading edge passed over Abilene about 9 p.m. The heavy cloud cover, expect- ed to produce some light showers overnight Friday, probably will lave moved out of West Central Texas by Saturday night, Durrett said. Skies over E! Paso in ex- reme West Texas were clear WHERE IT RAINED ABILENE Municipal Airport trace Total for Year 1.90 Normal for Year 3.18 DYESS AFB -...............2C :OLORADO CITY .24 MEHKEL MUNDAY ROCHESTER ROTAN 08 .20 .45 him worse thin that of deposed SNYDER .18 Argentine President Arturo Fron- 8WEETWATER ...........M program WESTTOOOK TREASURE HUNTERS SOUGHT The fate of seven missing American treasure hunters who departed from Pompana Beach, Fla., 1, Saturday night, re- mained a mystery Friday night. The group is overdue at Kingston, Jamaica, 2. The Cuban government claimed it had arrested seven North American citizens who "belonged to the so-called off the coast of Oriente Province, 3, Thursday morning. (AP Wire- photo Map) School Trustee Elections Today Contested school board races in a score of West Tedas communi- ties, including Abilene, will be set tied Saturday, election day. Eight candidates are seeking three trustee positions carrying six-year terms on the Abilene Board of Education. Seeking Place 4 are Glen Mich- el, independent oilman; Keith Wells, a petroleum geologist, and attorney James Weeks. Place 5 candidates are Elbert Hall, real estate and insurance ex- ecutive; Jim Millerman, insurance firm partner, and Isabel Arauza, assistant manager of a finance company. Mrs. Claud McAden, a 1961 school board appointee, is opposed in the Place 6 race by Raymond Soloski, engineer for Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. The name of a third candidate, Conner Elliott, who withdrew from contention, not appear on the ballot. are and Fair Park; H. D. Cumby, Wood- son; 0. J. Hamilton, AHS gym, and J. E. Freeman, fire station. While voters in most communi- ties will cast ballots strictly for school board candidates, Winters of me seven men off the north patrons vote either for against coast of rjriente Province Thurs- adoption of provisions in a state day mormng But they were not measure commonly known as Sen- ate Bill 116. The statute gives school board trustees authority to raise or lower taxes within set boundaries as the situation quires. Retiring board members John Hutchison in Place 4 Floyd Childs in Place 5. The new trustees will he sworn in Monday at p.m. in public schools administration building. The five Abilene polling places, to be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., will be located in thi county court- room at the Taylor County Court- house; Fair Park Recreation Building; Woodson Elementary School, 520 N. 9th St.; Abilene High School gym, and the N. 16th and Orange Sts. fire station. Election judges will be Sid E. Pass, courthouse; L. R. Lapham, Voting Map, Pg. 3-A Cuban-Held Group Said Innocent WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. skindivers arrested it. Cuba were described by Secretary of State Dean Rusk Friday night as innocent treasure-hunters, seeking the sunken riches of the Spanish Main. Rusk said the State Department expects to get them released. But a Havana television com- mentator said the seven may be treated as invaders by Prime Min- ister Fidel Castro's regime. The State Department said it was asking Switzerland to check on the seven men and arrange for their return to the United States. The Swiss have handled U.S. re- lations with Cuba since this coun- try severed diplomatic ties with tire Castro regime. Rusk told a news conference in Baton Rouge, La., that the depart- ment is moving promptly to ob- tain release of the seven, and doM not expect any difficulty. He said the captured men on a sports voyage to Jamaica to explore for treasure. Rusk was Baton Rouge for the inaugura- tion of Dr. John A. Hunter Jr. as president of Louisiana State University. He went straight from the air- port to the news conference and identified the seven as innocent adventurers. Havana radio announced arrest WEATHER U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WEATHER BUREAU (Weather map. paje 5- A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (radius miles) Cloudy to partly cloudy tDrouch Sunday, high both partl days 60-65, low Satur- day night 40-45. NOHTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN TEXAS: Saturday through Sunday. A most sections Saturday nifhl. Sunday. High Saluday 59 to 65. NORTHWESTERN TEXAS: ____ cloudy Saturday through Sunday. A Hti little cooler Warmer Partly A little ........_.___________day and Satur- nig-ht. Warmer Sunday. High Satur. 55 to 65. 'armer most sections Saiurd; day the day TEMPERATURES Frl a.m. 2.00 HiBh and low tor 24-hours 9 p.m. 61 and 49. High and low same date last year: 0 and 41. Sunset last night: aunrisc today: sunset tonight: Barometer reacting at 9 p.m.: 28.27. Humidity at 9 p.m.: M Kr cent identified in broadcasts monitored at Key West, Fla. Speculation had mounted that the seven were missing Ameri- can treasure hunters sought by the Coast Guard. They were cruis- ing the Caribbean on an undersea hunt for sunken treasure shins. Relatives of the missing men speculated they might have drift- ed into Cuban waters if their boat broke down. Marion Kuchilan, a semiofficial Havana television commentator, labeled the seven men invaders. and said their presence was not surprising in view of U.S. jungle maneuvers in Panama and anti- Castro exile activities in Guate- mala. The Havana broadcasts were) monitored at The Associated Press listening post in Key West. The Coast Guard said Friday night it has called off the search for the missing Americans, which had been continued after the Cu- ban broadcast because the men arrested were not identified. Search was discontinued pend- ing further developments, tht Coast Guard said. Republicans Plan 16-Hour Gabfest on Senate Floor By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON 16-hour be the nearest thing the House though several of them will speechfest scheduled by 16 Repub- has had to a filibuster in many main on at all times ta look lican members may keep the years. House in all-night session next Wednesday. There will be no legislative bus. blance of an audience, they may force a large attendance from ihess on tap. The GOP brigade time to time by making points of ceivei permission to speak for W has indicated it intends to discuss no quorum. When such a point is minutes each, what it regards as shortcomings made and the presiding officer many areas, of foreign aid and fiscal proce- througth with their plans, it will speaking in large numbers, after their party's interests and. In order to assure some sem- perhaps, engage in sonw heck- ling. The IS GOT orators have of the Kennedy administration in can't count a majority of the 437 James R Utt of CaU- mainly in the fields member, on hand a roU call to forma. John R Nta of New unless the House de- York, Charlei of the all-Bight ,jur.e cides to adjourn. The project has been dubbed Democrats Spring Thaw" by Re- to boycott it will help dramatize the GOP stand on major issues. "We intend to thaw out the VIENNA, Austria snow job the Kennedy Alfons Gorbach MM .ration has been doing on the pub- invited by lie over the el an come to WasW.ig.on May km tin I accepted, They are Reps, fni Schwenwi1 fornla, John H. RoutaeM of Catt- they forma. John M. Aaberosti Obit. Donald C. Bruce of IwitaM, Crasf Hoemer of Calllcnua, J. MaflHard of ____ 14. Petty of WisiUFti Mm B. D-nMsiaa   

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