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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 3, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 3, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               gfoflene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORL NO. 290 ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 3, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Auoeiaiett PAGE ONE [By Katharyn Dctffj The season comes on in which the buffalo clover, the Lupinun texensis holds forth. Pretty soon now the bluebonnets, the of- ficial Texas flower, will be blooming on gravelly limestone hillsides, in pastures, along roadsides from just south of Abilene on south to Mexico. The Wild bluebonnet doesn't flourish right around Abilene, but some "tame" ones can be found. One- particular bed of blue is that planted and cultivated by Ward, 302 Ross, into the shape of the Lone Star. The bluebonnet star, 25 feet from point to point, can be seen from (he street. Lee. Byrd, Abilene attorney, recommends to lawyers every- where an experience he had a couple of weeks ago. He served on a jury. Three juries, in fact- "It's worth a year of he concludes. Byrd received a call for duty in Taylor County court-at-law and, instead of claiming the ex- emption from jury duty lawyers can get, he decided, by golly, he'd see how things are on the other side of the fence. Along with the other potential jurors he presented himself at the courtroom, Lawyers working in the court didn't mention Byrd's profes- sion and neither did Byrd men- tion to fellow jurors that he was an attorney. He came out of the delibera- tions with two conclusions: "I'm surely sold on the jury system. "I surely learned a lot of things NOT to do in trying a case learned how things sound to a jura1." Two of the three juries were "hung" but, Byrd says quickly, he didn't hang 'em. They were split 3-3. Pete Elliott, local funeral di- rector en route from a business Estes Goes Home After Bond Slashed ABILENE SPEAKER Lynn Stoekman, left, of Abi- lene, looks over a speech with Tom Anderson, editor of Farm and Ranch Magazine and a national director of the John Birch Society, which Anderson gave in Abilene Monday night. Anderson's visit here was spon- sored by the local Citizens Group for Freedom. (Staff Photo) Federal Aid Is Hit by Anderson By LANE TALBURT Reporter-News Staff Writer Kennedy administration leaders the decisions now being made by individuals, Ahderson said. "The bigger the governemnt is. accused Monday night oil the littler the people are. The 'deliberately trying to bring about I more decisions the government n welfare state in this country" byj does not allow us to make for Tom Anderson, ultra-conservativojoursclves, the nearer we are to editor of Farm and Ranch Maga- slavery. nc. "We conservatives think that The national director of the John lhe government should do only Birch society declared that prcsi-lwhat can'1 do tor them" By HAROLD WILLIAMS EL PASO (AP) _ Billie Sol Estes, one-time boy wonder of West agriculture, walked free Monday under reduced bond Federal Dist. Judge R. E. Thomason reduced bail from after hours of testimony, he testified, the name of a Swiss; company that a multitude of in- vestigators have been trying to lions in mortgages on fertilizer trace. One document shows that Su- perior Tank Co., of Amarillo, which has figured prominently in pendent and Enterprise which first began questioning the mil- the case, transferred tanks. Estes owns the Pecos Daily News. He said of the Independent and mortgages to a Swiss firm listed actual transaction. Explains Reason He said the name was attached to documents to confuse his news- including statements that Estes as K. Weinheimer. threatened to flee to extradition- proof Brazil. Thomason said signatures of three of the defendant's relatives were sufficient. One was his father, .a farmer. Ruddy faced, black haired Estes and three of his associates were arrested and charged last Thursday with conspiracy and :ransporting fraudulent mort- gages from Texas to California in multi-million-dollar deals. Signing as surety were John Estes of Clyde, the father; Dr. Sol Estes of Abilene, an uncle; and Dr. John Estes, Abilene, a brother. Swarm of Newsmen Estes, his head held high and walking at a fast, nervous gait, walked from the courthouse into a swarm of newsmen. Only minutes before, the 37- year-old Estes said he owes million. Frank Cain, a Dallas lawyer, quoted Estes as saying he planned to take all the money he could rake together and flee to Brazil if authorities or lending compan- ies moved in on him. Cain said Estes leaned an el- bow on a casket in Estes' funeral parlor in Pecos and declared: "If you money-changers start "I thought if they wanted some- jthing to write I'd give them some- thing to write about." Estes said there was no suchj William Ken-, Estes' attorney, said the financier would have no statement to newsmen. Lawyers sought to have Estes identify the signature of Harold opposition, the Pecos Inde-IOrr, president of Superior Manu- facturing Co. to whom many of million in its mortgages may the fertilizer tank mortgages were assigned and who is charged with Estes. Saw Signatures But the financier said he had seen GIT'S signature several times, paid little attention to it, and therefore could not identify it. Orr, 31, Amarillo; Ruel Alex- secretary-treasurer; and Coleman McSpadden. 45, Lubbock, a Su- be affected. Robert I. Livingston, president of Heller, said the com- pany must make "extraordinary provision for losses out of this year's earnings." Estes, after picking up his per- sonal possessions, left the jail and ander', 36, Amarillo, Superior's courthouse area with a friend from Pecos. Before the bond hearing, Judge perior are charged along Thomason convened the regular with Estes. grand jury, and radicated he ex- One lending company, Walter E. Heller and Co. of Chicago, said See ESTES, Pg. 2-A; Cob. lential advisors Arthur M. Anderson said. singer and John Kenneth The government already oper- M-aith have remarked that some 700 "huge corporations" must drain off more of our ju-jand businesses hearing down my house of cards, into (he public sector [Constitution does not authorize, the I'm going to get all I can together "In other said Andcr- "And that's and ]cave." son. "the government would do ot of things for us that we used o do for ourselves." Hosting Anderson's brief ap- in Abilene for an hour- long televised speech Monday trip, stopped in one day last was thc Citizens Group for week io call on an ill friend at of which Dr. Irby Fox! a southside Abilene home. "Hope don't excite the neigh- he commented, pointing to his long, black vehicle parked out front. "Took a patient to Temple once and stopped hy to see a sick cousin. Neighbors saw my coach and came run- ning, mournful looks on Iheir faces, mournful tones in their voices." And, as he told his story here came the sick friend's neighbors, mournful looks on their faces, mournful tones in their voices. socialism." "One of the New Frontiersmen confided to friends recently that the government intends to na- tionalize power, medicine, agri- culture and (a few incidentals like Anderson said. Administrative leaders claim Birthday No. 95 comes around tomorrow for J. F. Jones, 1702 Grape. Mr. Jones was born in Mis- sissippi April 4, 1807. back in He- construction Days. His family migrated to Texas when he was 4, came "way out west" to Stephens County when he was 8. Mr. Jones moved to Haskcll in 1890 and there he and his wife were married 60 years ago March 5. The couple moved to Abilene in 1921 so they could sent their eon (Burwell Jones, now of Dal- las) and daughter (now Mrs. Ben Parker of Clyde) to "Sim- mons College." The -family home has since been on Grape St. Mr. Jones spent his active years in the cattle and stock business and in furniture and hardware business in Haskcll and Colorado City. An Abilene woman who be- lieves woman's place is in the home .tells about the timid suf- fragette worker who was too shy to make speeches and beat drums and parade for women's rights. "I just she said. "You commanded the burly suffragette leader. "You go home and pray to God for courage and SHE will give it to you." Vacation Started WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.   M :mtrmbers of o avert i "lrolv "1C Syrian parliamentary regime last Wednesday were be- and had assets of million "af reachl hwe from exiled to pave the way for; 'svi-ian capital of Damascus settlement. Among the six were: a going business." "I know I can pay it saidl the short, sturdy Pecos u'i'i, Indira io qui to be several of the most jaclive anti-Nasser officers. Pleads With Judge jn Syrjo The JMnta has becn snaken hv Turning lo Thomason, the sen- j fm. Syriajthe pro-Nasser uprising in Aleppo: ous, neatly-dressed d cte olhcr key towns in northern pleaded: ..'ill move townrd [president Gamal Abdel Nasser's! and central sections of the coun- other place or slight in any "I'm for a national purpose (led- my responsibility to the law." ic.ited to freeing the enslaving] Estes finally clarified one of lhe tlT I T1 "I i L .1..V..-., I wont lR1razl1 Arab Republic. Those Government hy that design will people of the Anderson fabulous mysteries of his case. jwere severed last September. rcling (o these reports, for- resident Shukri Gen. Abadel Kerim conimander-in-chief. of the Syrian army, and Gen. Namik Kama! Liz Taylor Says Marriage With Eddie Fisher Finished By HENRIETTA LEITIl NEW YORK (AP) Beautiful Elizabeth Taylor .let her lawyer being made. Fisher was attending a Broadway play. In Rome, the 30-year-old actress tell the world Monday night what and Burton were seen driving into the grounds of her villa after at: lending a cocktail parly in a priv- ate apartment with several friends. Fisher was apparently in good spirits as he left his hotel for the theater. He told newsmen he planned to stay in New York only il has -suspected for three-year marriage to singer Ed- die Fisher is over. Liz, .in Rome, and Fisher, in New York, jointly approved a statement issued through their lawyer, Louis "Elizabeth and Eddie Fisher it said, "that they lave mutually agreed to part. Di- vorce- proceedings will bo insti- tuted soon." The bare announcement, marked an end to suspense built up in recent weeks by Miss Taylor's growing interest, in her "Cleo- aalra" costar, Richard Burton, ns :hcy worked on location in Rome, and Fisher's desperate efforts to keep the marriage together and deny that the break was immi- nent. While the announcement was NEWS INDEX Polls Open at SECTION A Obitucrtei 6 Sports 8, 9 Oil newi 10 Amuiementi T1 SECTION B Women's iwwi 3 Cdltorloli 4 Comic. S Hfdlo-TV S farm miwi, mtrfciti ,.iollc leaders of Syria's oris-iwere reported heading the junta "I picked it out of the blue sky, mcrgcr negotiating team. in 1958 and the conservative j Monday, the junta appeared to Aleppo political leader Rushdi ignoring northern rebel radio khya were mediating between the broadcasts claiming control of Damascus junta and the area. The junta threatened ser army officers in Aleppo. lstjff punishment, for troublemak- The reports said a compromise. ers closed land and sea fron- tiers. But a junta statement that fol- lowed indicated the junta leaders want an equal partnership nr M- crtion with not what they consider Syria's submerg- ence by Nasser. "The high command of the armed forces explained that it a short time before going to Hollywood. "I gotta see my he said. "They gotta see me." He apparently referred to his daughter and son by his previous marriage to actress Debbie Reynolds. Miss Reynolds is now married to shoe magnate Harry Karl. Miss Taylor married Fisher in 1059 after their romance broke up Fisher's marriage to Miss Reynolds. Previously she had been married to hotel heir Nick Hilton, actor Michael Wilding and producer Mike Todd. Divorce ended her first two marriages, and Todd was killed in a plane crash in 1958. Miss Taylor and Bin inn have been seen together frequently off the set of lunching, nightclubbing and on one occasion being photographed kissing dur- See MARRIAGE 2-A, Coh. WEATHER IT S DEPARTMENT OF COMMKKCE WEATHER RURKAU (Weatlter Man 1'aee 2-B) ABII.KNE AND VICINITY IKadills 40 Miles) Partly cloudy iiml mild and windy Tuesday and Wednesday. Ilifh Tuesday 70 to 75, low Tuesday ttiBlit i lo 50. tlich Wednesday 75 to 80. NORTH CENTRAL TKXAS: Variable hljlh cloudiness and warmer Tuesday. Cloudy and a little warmer Tuesday nlcht and Wednesday. Widely seattered showers mainly east, portion1 Wednesday. Tuesday (53-71. NORTHWEST TEXAS: Variable hiKh loudiness and warmer Tuesday ami night. Cloudy south partly cloudy nortli and a little warmer Wednesday Poslblv lew showers Tuesday nljjhl er Weflnei TEXAS Cloudy It ly cloudy and a Htllc warmer TV through Wednesday. High Tuesday I TEMPERATURES sAtty. High Tues- ____ and low 24-bours emlintf 9 p.m.: G6 and 35. nd low mime dalr last year: ID Suniirt ttut nixht: iimrlse today tonight: 7. rMMfinc 9 p nv: Sn.J9. Humidlu p.m. 91 cent. CITY VOTING LOCATIONS SET Voting locations in Tues- day's city election are shown below. County precinct num- bers (which arc listed on poll taxes and exemptions) are listed first, followed by the location of the city voting box for -those precincts. A map showing boundaries of the county precincts was on page 8-B ol Sunday's Reporter- News. 1-2 S. 5th and Butternut Fire Station. 3.4 _ Fair Park Recrea- tion Bldg. 5-13 Boy Scout Hq., 3325 S. llth. 6-39-Dyess West Texas Rehabilitation Center, 4611 Hartford. 7-8 Health Unit, 2241 S. 19th St. 9-13 _ N. 2nd and Mulber- ry Fire Station. 10 Woodson School, 520 N. 9lh St. 11-17 ACC Fire Station, 558 E.N. 19th. 15-38 Fire Station, N. 10th and Pioneer. 12-U-Phantom Lake ?.'tary Frances Hall, H-S0. West New Guinea invaded by Force From Indonesia JAKARTA, Indonesia donesia reported Monday its guer- rillas had landed at three points in West New Guinea. Government sources predicted that, under U.S. pressure, talks soon will be re- sumed with the Netherlands in the island dispute. Defense Minister Abdul Haris Nasution, reporting the guerrilla landings, asserted the navy and air force are patrolling along the beaches. He said the infiltrators went ashore at the oil port oi Sorong on the northwest tip of New Guinea: at Fakfak. on the south- west coast; and at Kaimana in the south. The Dutch have ac- knowledged landings in all these areas except Sorong but said the infiltrators are being wiped out. Sorong is 30 miles across Dam- pier Strait from the island of Waigeo, where the Dutch said some infiltrators landed. believes in unity with all liberated Arab countries, and first ef all with Egypt, provided this unity is established on a genuine basis and with conditions guaranteeing I :he dignity of this country and' its entity and avoiding the mis- takes of the the condi- tion that these conditions are de- cided in a popular free referen- dum." it said. With all the conditions, the offer seemed lo amount Jo a proposal :hat Syria, Egypt and possibly other Arab states organize a fed- eration, rather than a unified re- public ns in the old U.A.It. Striving to avert open civil war. junta leaders were reported try- City Voting Due Today Abilenians will elect two city commissioners Tuesday a n d de- cide on the issuance of mil- lion in revenue bonds for a new sewage treatment plant. Less than half the city's quali- fied voters are expected to go to the polls. City hall observers Mon- day said they expect the vote turn- out to be about equal to the 1961 joint city-state election, when voters cast ballots. During the past five years of city elections, records show that the largest number to vote was last year. In 1960, only voted, while in 1959 the vote totaled 7, head compromise government. ing to (ind civilian politicans to 000. A record low of votwl in I9M and in 1957. There H e Sure to an estimated qualuM ers in the city. Most of the interest ejection has been generated by the five candidates seeking two council scats. The bond proposal has failed to add to the interest. There is no apparent dppoiitioa to the bond Votes may be cast in one of M polling places in the city. polls open at 7 a.m. and at 7 p.m. Candidates for thc North commission seat tft Gtorft Knerwer and Pete Gooch. Rw- ning for the MM m flee VOTIMS, Pg. M, I _ allot   

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