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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: March 25, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 25, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS. OR FOES W E SKETCH YOUR 9gOG 81ST YEAH, NO. 281 E, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, MARCH 25, PAGES IN FIVE SECTIONS Associated Press (ff) now Ra Mud Balls, Winds It rained mud balls at Snycler, blinding dust caused a car wreck near Koscoe and hurricane-force winds bat- tered big Spring Saturday as West Texas weather had a field day. A swirling dust storm with winds gusling fo 33 miles per hour slamnied into Abilene territory ciitliiig visi- bility to two miles here The Big Spring winds were recorded at 78 miles per hour. At least one traffic accident was attributed lo the storm. Donald Clork, about M, was injured when !iis car struck a parked car along Use side, of U. S. Highway 84 north of Koscoe anci atom 15 mites northwest of Sweelwaler. Clark, of Inadale, said visibility was so poor he did not sec the parked vehicle. Ho was taken to .Simmons Memorial Hospital in Swcelwater for treatment of his School Bus Driver Found No! Guili GHEELEY, Colo. jury found.Duane R.. Harms, 23, inno- cent of involuntary manslaughter Saturday in the death of 20 chil- dren'when lie drove his school bus inlo tire path of'a'train. The- panel of 10 men and two injuries which were not serious. The fast-moving duster arrived in Eastland just before noon and passed over by p.m. Al- though winds were strong, no damage was reported. Midland's visibility was report- ed at three quartets of a mile By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A small lornado Saturday devastated the business dis- trict of Mineola, small East Texas railroad town, as twisters whirled over an area of rich pine forest and oil country. The Mineola twister struck while a large portion of East Texas was under tornado alert. The alert expired at 7 p.m. and was extended westward to cover an area from Litfkin to Texarkana, Ark., and 100 miles east of such a line until 11 p.m. Most of the newly alerted area was in Louisiana. Snow MI in (he Toxas Pon-jmelal in nearby power lines. A handle and blowing dust wastfalling tree ciushcd a ear. kicked up by fiirinus spring winds! Peerless Rakert that reached hurricane force. The 12 mijes northwest of sand blew nnd reduced visibilities'Sniphur Springs am! some 60 from E] to Dallas to Me- miles north ot Tyler, also was hit Allen in the Lower Hio Grande Valley. by a twister about 4 p.m. Four houses, t'.vo barns ami sev- during the height of the storm women returned ,ls verdict atlcrj At ab fcv 'of rain fell and residents reported She precipitation was more like nine hours ol all-night delibera tion. They found, -in effect, that Harms hart exercised all the care expected of him on the subfrcoz- ing morning of Dec. 14 when he pulled Onto tracks near here as a Union Pacific passenger train .approached at 79 miles an hour. Sixteen other children and Harms were injured in the collision. The slender, meek-appearing lather of an infant girl received Ihe jury's decision with litlle show of "I'm too tired to Harms said after spending nearly 24 sleepless hours. Fewer than a dozen people were hv (lie :courtroom when the jury relurncd its verdict at a.m. Judge Donald A. Carpenter had instructed the jury it had only two or guilty of involuntary manslaughter, this involves killing a person without Intent but during an unlawful act. The prosecution sought (o prove that Harms was criminally negli- gent in not making more effort to determine whether a Irain was coming. Harms testified that he did not remember whether he slopped the bus but said he did open the door as he approached the crossing. Three other defense witnesses told the court, however, that Harms did slop. Harms said the were frosted and wing the bus lo a bus windows the children noisy. He said he had never en- countered a train on the ciossing before. tiny mud balls than rain drops. Velocity of the wind [here reach- ed K> miles per hour. Big Spring residents described duster as the worst sand and dust storm since 1055 and motor- ists had lo drive with their lights CARS WRECKED BY TOKNADO Mineola Saturday I.VT Wirtnholo) There were no serious injuriesjcral other light structures were reported in the Mineoia fwislcrjlevclled. Damage was estimated although three persons were cut'at Soldier Us By LEWIS HAWKINS WASHINGTON   Cuban authorities reported Saturday an American soldier-flier sought rcf- Ry late Saturday the winds luge at Havana Friday. The Army around Abilene had diminished to said the man named by the Cit- about 10 miles per hour, Bob Mil- ler, meteorologist lechnicl.-m at the wealhor bureau, reported. Sunday's forecast calls for clear to partly cloudy and cooler tem- peratures. High Sunday will be around 55, the Low Sunday night nboul 40 degrees. Fisher io Keep Clerks Separate 7iOBV (HNS) Separation of the Fisher County district clerk's office from the county clerk's of- fice was approved in a light vote Saturday. Of 723 voles tabulated by late in the evening, 52n voters voted for the separation and 198 voters againsl. The Gannon box had not been reported, but only about five voles are expected from Gannon The offices are separate at the present and have for miilc sotne lime. The offices would have merged Jan. 1 if (he separa- tion had not been approved. Slate law says (hat when a county falls under Ihe population mark, Ihe offices are lo be merged. Colemcan Pioneer Is Fofally Burned (RNS) Mrs. Mary I. Dunman, 80, of Novice, mem- ber of a pioneer Coleman County family and prominent landowner, died in .Overall-Morris Memorial at 4 a.m. Saturday of burns received in an explosion fll her home Friday afternoon. Definite information could not be confirmed as to the cause of the blast, but il is believed that gas fumes from a leak in the eel- ler were ignilcd when a match wosslruck. Two employes of Mrs. Dunman reportedly had become ill after working in the celfcr and the hnd gone there lo investigate, Funeral will be held at p.m. Sunday in Stevens Memorial Chap- p el here with tha Hcv. Clem Lam- bert, pastor of First Presbyterian Church here, officiating. Burial will ho in Coleman Cemetery. Born nee. 5, I8HI, in DC Will County, she was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Morris. Tlie: family became early pio- nccrs of Coleman County. She owned considerable ll'.a county. property in Mrs. Dunman Inlo her rnnct, home as n bride more than half n century ngo. The much proper contains more Ihon acres in Taylor, Cnllnhan nnd Colcman counties wllh the .south- east corner stone of Taylor Conn- baiis is an Army deserter. Havana newspapers identified the man as Bobby J. Kecsec and said he landed a light civilian plane at Havana Airport at Friday morning, described him- self as a U. S. Army deserter and asked political asylum. The Army here said Sgt. Bobby J. Kcesee, 23, has been listed as a deserter since Feb. 25. He left his post at Ft. Huachuca, Ariz., Jan. 15 on a 15-day leave and in- dicated ho was going lo Guay- mas, Mexico. When he didn'l re- turn Jan. 30, he was listed as absent without leave ami later was classified as a deserter. His home is listed as Amarillo, Tex. The Army said Keesee was as- signed as an operator of a flight simulation training device and had access tn no secret military information which would Ix; of value to a foreign government. The Army spokesman said that in addition (o being wanted as a deserter. Kcesce was under in- vcslisation "for passing bogus checks and for forgery." The United Stales maintains no diplomatic relations with Commu- nist oricnleri Cuba and (here was tio indication whether nny al- templ would be made to have Kecsce returned lo this country. Keesee reportedly flew a sin- gle-engined, Piper Comanche plane which hc had rented from (he Sev- en Bar Flying Service at Albu- nuerque, N.M., last Wednesday. He landed Friday at Mara- Ihon, in the Florida Keys about Key West and jMiami and took off hastily for Nile 150-mile hop lo Havana. "He just must be mixed up Mrs. tiiley said in regard to Kecsce's night to Cuba. "I don't have any idea why he did "it." She said her brother enlisted as o a paratrooper in 1951, was wound- ed in the Korean conflict and was given Ihe Purple Heart and other day, wrecking Ihe building home in Texas medals. She said Kecsec planned to make the Army his career. Mrs. Riley beard of her broth- er's (light to Cuba over an Am- arillo radio station and called the station for more information. She said Keosee was the young- est of six children, and quit school in the eighth grade. He was a national guardsman belore join- ing the regular, army. Mrs. Riley said a slcol plate was necessary in treating a head wound Kecsec suffered in Ko He also suffered arm and wounds. She said her brother had a per- in the army. She said he was sta- Blast Hits S'waler PX SWEETWATER (HNS) steam boiler exploded inside tin community building a( er Air Force Station causing about damage, but resulting in no injuries. T. Sgt. Willis 1.. May, N'on- by flying glass and debris. Dam- age uas expected to total close to S500.000, residents said. Witnesses at Mineola said the tornado formed over Ihe south west section of the city and then moved northeasterly to the busk ness district. Mrs. I. Gray, a Mineola resi- dent, said the tornado cloud swept lo the ground wilh a "whip- lash molion." "Nearly every business house in Mineoja has Mrs. Gray told Press. "It's a miracle nobody was killed." liuilrtins Leveled Completely levelled hy the lipping winds was a large brick building on U. S. 80 near Mine- oia's center. Four automobiles in lite btiiWing were demolished. Twenty five automobiles at the Thunderstorms with hail and tlie threat of tornadoes boomed across the northern halt of the Commissined Officer of the Day.lheavily damaged Piggty Wiggly was in the library room somejstore were almost Total losses, distance from Ihe center of the a.m. blast in Ihe same Imitd- ing. He was unhurt and said the explosion sounded like a sonic boom. Hurricane winds of more than BT> mites an hour churned up bill- ows uf dust west ot Lubbock at Levclland. Up to two inches of snow fell and stuck lo (he ground in parls of the Panhandle and Soiifh Plains. (W MPH Winds fisting up to 60 miles cut visibility at Ihe West il centers of Odessa and to a quarter mite, the upper Panhandle, all telephone circuits between Ama> rillo and Dumas were reported downed for a while by ice and snow. Dumas had 1.50 inches of wet snow on the ground and the stuff still came down after noon. North vinds up to 35 miles an hour blew (here. Snow also fell at Muleshoe, Friona, Hereford and other West .Nen Ilarle of Hie .Mineola points, tor said Herman C. Bodiford and Jn North Central Texas, quarter S! hail pelted the Fort Worth witnesses said. wlien lho B'lvt- suburb of Hurst. The 60 x 40 masonry f-ulf Station was heavily dam- 1 Levclland radio KLTV clocked houses the post sentry room for exchange and the 083rd Air- craft Control and Warning Squad- i T E at 85 m.p.h., highest reading on tha The home of Mrs. Annie Mayf-fiie dust is rolling in." said The blast blew out part nf fcet orf.'.ls founda- Gene Stanley at the station. No information on Kcesce's family background or his length of Army service was immediate- ly available. Keesoe had been stationed at Ft. Huachuca since July 1OT. He was not married. Kcesce was horn in Allison, in tho Texas Panhandle. lis sister, Mrs. T. 0; Riley of Amarillo, told newsmen she raised Kecsee from the lime he was a year old. tioncd much of'the lime overseas, including duty in Russia. She did not know the details. Mrs. Uilcy said Kcesce was aboard a plane from which 21 paratroopers plunged to dcalh in an accident several years ago at Ft. lienning, Ga. Mrs. Riley said she last heard from her brother Ihe first nf Jan- uary when he called tn say hejaxehan The Department of Public Safe- Dycss AFB in Abilene studied the. Hereford nearly an inch of explosion later Saturday ami said'ty rcpnr'.ed Yha't'i torindo ro'ssi "inds a faulty valve may have caused :h'ly the same one RMo KI'AN off thc air Ihe biasl. tnrr-; A" had been to Las Vegas, Nov., and Irad van a large sum of money. WEATHER ewer Farm Acreage Vital Unless Bonds Voted By CLYOK FOSTER Reporlcr-.Vews Staff Abilene xvill need nearly three times ils present acreage by 1970 and about five limes ils present lolal by Ihe year 2000 unless it builds a secon- The cily's currenl irrigation farm includes acres, of which some acres are avail- farmja'''c irrigation with effluent! water. The remaining acres j -icrc j1 predicled srowih is arc in lagoons, roads, the cnmpiislied. us. OF co.imcitrt: i IUIKC.U! (IWnlhrr I'Uff Sll) ABILENE AND VICINITY iRjiiiu, 40 Mill's) Clear tn pnitly clouily ami cool- cr jinil Sumlay iiiehr, iflllc iv.inn- cr .Mnnrt.iy. Mich San.l.iy aro'.ir.tl 5i, low Sunday nichl 10. hich Momliiv [n Ifir 60s NORTH CBNTDAI. TKXA5: Clr.ir ID iwrlly cluuily Sunday. Fiir Siixl.iy nisht anil .Mrmday. ami 5u.id.TV nichl. HlKh SuiKl.iy M 65. NORTHWEST TKXAS: Ornr-rally fnir Sunday IMroufiri Mnml.iy. OMjlor snnthonjc [and I'Xtrcmr jiouth Sunday ami Sunday nljrM, llijjl; Suixl.v 5.1-M. 7FXAS: -i F.lir aivl and Mond.iy. nimlnlvfilr-K wi. Sundny. t'lrar ar.tl cool jughl. h Sur.day C5 75. dary treatment planl, an engi- neering study released this month) estimates. Abilenc's present sewer farm! operation, which will be supcrsed- ed hy an improved one if voters om. approve an April 3 bond election to finance a new secondary (real Mrs. Nowlln and Chnrlcs R. Taylor, both of Cole- man; five grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and two sisters, Mrs. TO. L Knox of -Ilurkcu and Mrs. J. A. n. Miller of Colrmnn. will be Eugene Oplin Wade Hrnoks, Fred Rudolph, Smmdcrs, Gilford Scolt, ty deep Inside il.s fences. Illcmphill, Jim Gill, Wallace Din- Survivors include two diiughlerajgus, and William T. Jones. -Y c, i Sat. a.m. Cl sv M S3 HI cr fti 62 EO 53 iiiivi 13 Ilieh anil 1cm1 for 21 -hours cmlinx i.ni.: 63 Had 31. ULxh and mnir ilMe l.m >ran Sunsrl hM pluhl: sur.rUc :.V5; Aiinnc1. lonlKhl: narninolc-r rrnrtiim til t! p.nu 2fl 01, HumLcllly il U p.m. to per cent. silc, borders, levcc.s areas not subject to irrigation. Based on an application of three feet nf water per year, the amount now (icing used, Ihe current need for farm land is acres. A proposed application of two feet Reports lo the Department of( (0 in [he Public .Safely at Tyler placed Ihe Ulo 33 miiD daiiiase at Mineola between SiOO, was v.Un 1.50 000 ami town blocks inchrs The hlaukcl K. were b n t I e r e d. Buildings and to trees were, the main sufferers, lo of Damage at the Swan cominiin-lDsim.is. ity was estimated at The! The Panhandle snow was too twister was observed by Tyler pa-.wct for drifting, despite Ihe sales, jtro! cars. i jncjt pounded a At I.indale, Iwtween Tyler andjfive square mile are.-, of southeast Mincoln, Ihe Reliance Clay Prod-iOrayson Countv for 20 minutes three feet per acre and 10.HW acr-iUis was haril hjt hy noon Saturday. Th.o cs for application nf two fcet pn .twister. Siiperintcmlent II. I.. Far-j.-lonn centered in Ihe Tom well estimated the damage at'area. A number of roofs were more than The cover- was raked by high winds cd with ice. Highways were s'.usliy need acres for application of ment plant, has resulted in dam- ago siiils seeking more than :uillion, Mayor C. U. Kinarrl said this week in urging support of the proposed Imnil issue. Hears nut Nenl feel this sliows (he need for additional sewer plant facili- ties for (he. he said. "Tlie of independent engineer- ing firms on Ihe sewer project bears out Ihe need for improved (r.cililics A lolal of 22 damage suits have been filed against Ihe city. The first Ciinic lo nn unhappy from the cily's poinl of week when the Toxns .Supreme Court refused a motion for IT- honing which lefl In effect a judgment for In tho first] need lo acres, Ihe latest engineer's report shows. Acres by 2000 This requirement would in- crease lo acres in 1970 and by Ihe year 2000 the cily would N'ecd for surface acreage could be decreased considerably through Ihe use nf oxidation lasoons rath- er than the irrigation method hul nnci hail. Some roof damage was! ''or ,n while. The wind lifted the roof; Police a! Duma? Dalhart from old f'nrmers Jc Mer--was rejK'rtod without ek-ctrlc pyw- Ihe lagoon sysicm is not recom- mended because of odor and other problems in such a system, the report goes on. Primary treatment facilities (or the present plant were complet- ed in 1958 nnd are considered ado-; quatc for needs with the ncwj secondary treatment unit rhants compress and llieler. Cuban Government Reshuffles Cabinet NEWS INDEX ;minor chances. Primary treatment facilities for Ihe present operation include a mechanically cleaned bar screen SECTION A Oil news ........i Obituarict SECTION B Book news......... Church news Bridge Amuicmcntj SECTION C Women's nawi...... Rodlo-TV logj TV Scout SECTION D case taken to court. V 1 Form newt 10 .10 4 4 8 ...8 .1.14 .11 ...II ,.1-S ,..10 i HAVANA The Cubnn." jovei nmont announced a rcshuf- Rrlalnl story. 1'iiRf.' of iho Cabinet Saturday. liuig-limo Communist party mcm-i wilh grinder, a grit removal hasin ucr moved inlo a lop jwst as wilh rotary collecting mechanism, interior trade minister and L'. The aiinnuncc- jment s.iid Herman will fulfill government Amctiutis. Iwo primary elarifiers. two di- gesters, four .sludge lagoons and five holding ponds. Only one additional bar screen, for wliich facilities were includ- ed when the primary plant w.i> built, be required In meet the needs through Ihe report shows. The voters of Abilene, on Jul> 17, 1954. approved a Sec SBWKR, Pg. 12-A, Cols. 1, 2 olutinnary heroine look over a key aide. Prime Minister i-'idel Castro promised some changes! in a major address recenlly. Coli.i nho fmighl be- side Castio in Ihe mountains o( eastern Cub.i (liiriiig his guerrilla '.days, was named sifrclary In hie residency "ml the C'niincil of ...linislers. This is nut a posl of llu-rc were abuses of millislci.i.l, ,lKCfftl, horny and numerous errors by! aiilcs Ihe changes Su louncci! looked mure like Irans-i fers than dismissals. Long-time Communist parly iiemhcr Manuel l.uyaido re- Ipll'llll! (.'Ulllt. The reshuffU' came on Ihe hcols lof an aiiiiouni-eiiK'nl Kridiiy that placed Maximo Becman in the. Sec CUBAN', IV- 12-A, Col. 4   

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