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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, March 21, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 21, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES W E SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 8IST YEAR, NO. 276 ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 21, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press FRENCH, ARMY CLASH LONG, LONG ROAD Johnny Christensen, 4, looks down a long trail as his thoughts turn to baseball in the spring. Loping along the railroad tracks at Ani- herstein, near Kingston, Out., Johnny's heading a practice session. (AP Wirephoto) SPRING IS HERE Marilou Forth, 1, daughter of Mr.'and Mrs. Donald Forth of Dallas, is sampling her first venial equinox by examining blossoms on trees, She decided she likes spring, even if it can also mean wind and sudden rains. (AP Wirephoto) Rehearing Is Refused In Sewer Farm Case Street Battle Opens in Oran ALGIERS (AP) A savage reel battle between French roops and right-wing European ecrel Army guerrillas broke out the heart of Oran today and epeated rounds of gunfire blast- d the working quarter of Bab el ued in Algiers. A number of per- ons were wounded or killed. The shooting shattered a quiet liat had prevailed up to noon in after nearly two days of loody clashes in the wake of a ease-fire proclaimed between Syria, Israel Clash in Air Dog Fight JERUSALEM and sraeli warplanes clashed today nd a Syrian spokesman said one sraeli fighter fled from a dog ighl in flames. Each nation accused the other >f violating its air space in this ollowup lo hostilities launched in an eight-hour battle in the Sea of lalilee area Saturday. An Israeli military spokesman said Syrian planes penetiated Is air space for the seconc ciay in a row, hut were driven ofl by Israeli fighlers. A Syrian spokesman charged hat four Israeli planes flew into Syrian territory, where they were ntcrcepted by fighters ot tha Arab nation. "Our planes quickly vent ill against (hem and scored a hit or one of the Israeli hi said. "This Israeli plane was seei in flames returning to Palestiniai territory." The Syrians use Russian-mad MIG17s. The Israeli fighters ar French Myslcre jets. A dispatch from Damascus sai unusual air aclivily was notcc over that Syrian capital this morn ing, wilh MIG fighlers flashin through the sky. Damascus is lii tie more than 40 miles from th frontier. Israel filed another complain wilh the U.N. Syrian-Israeli arm istice commission. Foreign Minis ler Golda Meir was reported I have asked Michael Comny, hea of the Israeli U.N. delegation i New York, to request .an early meeting of the Security Council to discuss Israel's earlier call for o 'ranee and the Algerian nation- lists. The battle in Oran was the first pen clash reported there be- ween French government forces nd the Secret Army since the ease-fire. The Secret Army is etermined to keep Algeria The battle broke out just after ioon and continued until p.m. Unofficial sources said the fight larted when a mobile squad of endaimes came upon a roving icciet Army patrol. The gen- armes were attacked from an- I ither direction by another Secret irmy commando unit. 4 Many young Europeans then tarted firing with pistols from vintlows and Bands of 'onlhs set up roadblocks, and iiillels whistled down the main msiness streets. Shoppers ran vildly for cover. A French gendarme said he bought many had been wounded vhen his platoon was ambushed i a narrow street. Unofficial sources said a Secret radio station was found in a search of an apartment. In Algiers, round after round of gunfire was heard in Bab el Oued, cene of frequent trouble. A cur- ew was ordered in the quarter and loudspeaker trucks ordered he residents indoors. It was not clear wlw was doing he shooting. The French said at noon there md been no reports of clashes >etween French units and Mos- ems anywhere in the North Afri- can territory. The army said "localized effer- of Moslem crowds con tinned in a number of villages but (.U- WheDholo) TAXICAB WINDSHIELD SMASHED BY MORTAR ATTACK five shells lobbed into Moslem crowd in Algiers MOSCOW Premier Khrushchev agreed today to coop- erate with Ihe United States in President Kennedy on March after an agreement on suggesting that the United the Sovi pool their! efforts in such fields as weather i Commenljng on the advantage Judgment Affirmed in Bailey Suit The Texas Supreme Court Wednesday made its final rieci- ion upholding the judgment against the city of Abilene in the suit brought by William L. Bai- ley for land damage as a result of the sewer farm. The high court refused the ap- plication for rehearing of the case, which established the city's liability for damage to adjoining property by the sewer farm oper- ation. Both Tom Eplen, attorney who represented the city in the trial of the case in district court in Shnckelford County and the original appeal, in IHh Court of. Civil Appeals at Easlland, and John Davidson, city attorney, said Wednesday noon they had no comment to make on the de- cision. Only remaining possible step or the ctiy is a highly unusual ;ecoiid motion for rehearing. The Supreme Court on Oct. 25 lad upheld a damage iudgmenl in favor of Bailey in the 'irst of 22 cases filed by proper- .y owners in the area of the sew. er farm. The fact that the court .cok nearly five months to rule on the city's motion for rehear- ing had brought some hope to city officials for a reversal. The city currently is awaiting decision on a motion to ad- vance a hearing m the Court of Civil Appeals at Easttand on three additional suits, joined into a single case, concerning other space exploration, including a Pro-jfoi-ecastin" ami international Khrushchev said a vehicles to and evcn communications system ploration of (he moor, and planets, would result in "considerable im- Khrushchev proposed a in the means of corn- program largely parallel to thc.mnnication and television on the planets. But he emphasized such joint ventures depend "jdegree on the solution oE the dis- armament problem." See ALGERIA, 1'g. ll-A, Cot. 4 I Khrushchev replied to a Idler of AS ASS'T ATTORNEYS Behrens, Smith City Attorney John Davidson said Wednesday he will recom- mend William Behrens of Abilene and David Lee Smilh of Austin to the Abilene City Commission Thursday to named as assist- ant city attorneys. Behrens and Smith, both Janu- ary law school graduates currently debate on "Syrian actVand'thTe'als lhdr .bar mmations taken earlier this President's suggestions. Me said he was instructing Soviet repre- sentatives in the U.N1. Snace Com-! mittce to meet American repre- sentatives and discuss practical plans. But he added: "At the same lime it scorns ob- "People- will get a reliable means of communication and un- precedented possibilities for the damage claims by residents of the sewer farm area. -More than SI million is at stake in the damage suits filed against the city. The Bailey case was the first tried and has been generally considered as a test case to de- termine whether the city is lia- ble for damage to adjoining prop. erty by the operation of. the sew- of The Security Council is expected to meet next week lo take up Syr- ia's similar charges against Is- rael. East German Diplomat Will See Gromyko About Berlin GENEVA Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko sum- moned Communist East Ger- rniiny's lop diplomat to Geneva to- day for consultnlion. This slop gave fresh urgency to East-West talks on Berlin againsl the back ground of the 17-nation clisarmn- mcnt conference. The conference ilsclf addressed a special bid to France to abandon Its boycott of thc Geneva meeting and send a delegate to fill the empty' 18th chfiir. There was no indication thai President do Gaulle would heed Iho appeal. He con- siders'the meeting'useless. Do (Jaullc, refused lo French .delegates to, (be1 confer wice, saying .'worthwhile disnrmn merit nego lint ions could be car rled by the four power: (hot have nuclear weapons. On another front, disarmament experts nf Ihe United States, Brit ami Ihc Sovjcl Union rcsiimn three-power discussions ot n mi clear weapons lest ban. Jufnr mnnls snld Ihcy failed lo mnk any dent in ihe East-West dcnd lock over provisions for inspection o police tl'e ban. They did agree, 3 meet again Thursday. Pressure mmmlcil among thc ncommitlcd nations for a niora- orium on nuclear weapons tests >efore thc United States resumes csling in the almasphere next iionth. From Moscow, meanwhile, word that Premier Khnish- "hev had sent n message lo Presi- !enl Kennedy agreeing lo discuss nternalional cooperation in ex- ilnring outer space. East German Foreign Minister -ollinr Bolz was expected here NEWS iNDEX SECTION A To Your Good Health 3 Bridge 3 Business Outlook S 12-14 SECTION B Amusements 4 Women's nowl Editorials Comics 7 Rodlo-TV logs n TV Report n Oblluarlci 11 lie today or tonight to consult vith Gromyko. He would have ome earlier, Communist infor mnnts said, but for some reason Switzerland was s'.ow in issuing he necessary visas. Gromyko pro ested to the Swiss. Western officials were closely watching Ihe oulbursl of Sovie ictivily, which seems to have be gun wilh new instructions to Gro myko from Moscow Monday. Oi hat day Gromyko osked Scere tary of State Dean Rusk lo a brie alk and reportedly gave him n 'working paper" of various views on Berlin crisis issues. Grornyko entertained Rusk nnt a panel of Berlin policy experts a ilmner Tuesday nighl. They lalkc [or more than three hours. Lnle word circuited in Western qunr Icrs that Hie Russians had no come up with any new idea.? o hints of concessions. Concerning n moratorium, For clgn Ministers Mp.hmoud Fnwv. of Ihe United Arab Republic, Ke temft Yifru ot Ethlopln ami U Th Sec GENEVA, Pg. ll-A Col, I lonth, will be recommended to 11 vacancies in the legal deparl- t left recently by the resigna- on of Truman P. Kirk and Kob- rt Matiderson. Behrens, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Behrens Sr., Shorline Cir- le, is a native of Abilene. He was raduated from Abilene High chool and received his bachelor's cgree at Dartmouth College, rhcre he graduated summa cum ande in 1050. Following two years of service n thc Navy as lieutenant e entered Southern Mclhoclisl Un- vious to me that (lie scojie of oiirjforecasting wilh the aid of arti- cooperation in the peaceful earth satellites "will make ploralion of space, just as Ihe choice of the very directions along expansion of contacts farm, peoples." he said. On April 3 the city will vote on Khrushchev predicted weather a bond issue to pro- vide secondary treatment facUi- it possible to wage a more snc-i ccssful struggle against ties for the city sewer system. If (he bond issue is approved, it that work on the sec- u-liich such cooperation would be disaster and will opeji treatment plant will be- f-sible, depends in some tor the increase of (he as soon as plans can be coin on the solution of the disiirma-.faie of mankind." mcnt problem." Before an agreement on general and complete disarmament isi reached, he said, both countries, arc limited in the possibility oil space. j "I state these consicloratioiis for Dooiey Fund Files Bankruptcy Suit pleled and that the new plant probably will be in operation by the summer of Meanwhile, however, addition- al cases from among the 22 filed against the city will be brought tu trial. j In previous cases, juries in rtis- Ihe simple reason that it would. ST. LOUIS Dr. Tomjtrict courts have averaged award- .itc Fund, an organiza- ins 82 cents per dollar of dam- to continue the famediascs sought in the suits filed against Ihe city. The suits all alleging virtual- ly Ihe same thing, claim dam- be belter if we see all Ihc sides Doolcy Tribul jthe question in a realistic lie ai (lea. The 17-nalion disarmament feivnce meeting in Geneva a voluntary bankruptcy peli- ages as a result of raising of the water level in thexirea, noxious iMarch 14 has mnde no visible (ion in U.S. District Court, progress because of disagreement Dnoley, famed for eslab- ovcr Ihe issue of inspection lo medical missions in Laosjfumcs. odors, insects and sewage vent cheating. pnmitivu areas, died seeping onto the farm In his March 7 letter, jarl. IMI. (Iam1s adjoining thc pr0pcrly _ proposed Soviet-American Thfi fumrs petition, have been halted for Ihe past ation in launching satellites Monday, slated the org l monlhs pending possible WEATHER U. S. DEPARTMENT OK COMMKHCK HT.ATiiER IWnlhrr 1VA1 AR1I.KSK ANI> VICINITY Illntllm illtJI Parlly cloudy and throuch 'iy, Kew uldclv .icMtcrcd th-Jnrlci i High lixlay of low of 45 lonlHhl. hleh clrmily' ,clo; ;hi r.irll' Uife" charinc" 'ioiUsht anil "Thur.Ml.-iy. of ihowjrs in wnlrtl lo 52. Illsh Thursday la and cool f'WMST TKXAS Parllv cloudy ler (orfny, clcjutiy tnnlcm arx? laic A little warmer In "mr lixilrjil M In no'tli to -W 111 liKh Thursday 55 in nnnfi lo ......_... scattered tl ,t THursoay tdr.isl-.l. WILLIAM HEIIKENS mny fill vncnncy ivcrsiiy Law School, where he was graduated in Januaiy. Ho c'lirrently is on vacation in California. Davidson will recom- mend that his appointment be ef- fective April 2. Smith, 2K, living in Austin but is n native of Sormra. He is married and tins one ler. He is a graduate of Kasl Tex- as State College nnd the Univer- sity of Texas Law School. lie served two years in (he Army and wos discharged as a staff sergeant. 1 His appointment, if approved b> the commission, will be effective. Friday. fioth are members of Phi Atph; lined luunuay siciieii uie u, munuis pcnuiiij; puasiuie weather observation, mapping had debts of and assets settlements on some claims and earth's ni_aKiietic field and ?1 awaiting High Court decision. menting in intcrctJiitnu-ntal t-om-j_____'.___________________________________________________. mmicatinns helping track each! thcr's space shots and ixioiing in-: ormation on space medicine. Khrushchev's piogram, read: ivcr Moscow Iladio, was: 1. Cnoiicration in setting up in-i ernalional crunmuuicalions vorks earth satellites, j 2. A joint project for studs ing and observing weather by means of orbiting satellites. 3. Organization of .faint railioj ir.d telescopic liiickinv; of vehicles launched toward other ilanels such as Mars and Venus the moon. 4. Conclusion of an agreement for rendering aid lo space vehicles'vicldint; to the admiiiis'.ralion. lrK uuih and lour' dntt Iml year: M: nintlit tcxlayi iniet tonljhl: rler rramnx al 28.07, suMtlirt e-.n; uiniet tonljhl: UArctmrler rramnx al n< flumldlly nooni per ctnl. Delia I l fraternity. Actress to Wed MEXICO CITY- Tlritisl actor ICdmiu.Kl Purdoni and Mcsi csan-horn ncircss t.imla Clirislint will be married here Saturday Miss Christian Is Iho widow o Tyrone Power. WASHINGTON Services Committee, hnd between the Pentagon and lo make a "flat-footed House Armed Services Committee over HS70 supersonic bombors ended today with thc committee's n difficulty in space. Tills also The committee deckled not lo envisages joint opera- press its fight to direct the admin- lions (or space pilots in distress. 5. Cooperation in mapping the magnetic field surrounding the earth and the exchange of space medical information. istratiou to build Ihe bombers, which Secretary ol Defense Rob- ert S. McXamara said did not fit into the current military piogram. Hep. William M. I'olrner. B, Agreement on a common np-I.Miss., so informed llio House as il to legal problems for gunei-al debale on il-< In space exploration. jinililnry I'nmmiltcc's addition of Further, Khrushchev said. milliiin for the 11SVO lo a were much greater prospects oil billion bill for cooperation in joint crenltou of ships, missiles ai space ships for reachinp olhev planets rwt this would only he ClUlillUdiOll ,ml nlrcmft. of IJcforc thc House met, Hep. Carl Vinson, chnintian ot the I pro; fight" to expand Ihe RS70 pro- gram. But Vinson was known to have been under heavy pressure from administration leaders -and from the While House itself to reach a compromise (hat would avoid a running battle with the Defense Department. Thc decision by Vinson to give up the tight was reached nfter a special meoting of thc Armed Services Committee. As approved by tha committee, (he bill carried a provision to "direct" that McNamara spend on Ihe HS70 million more than the- McNaniara request- ed.   

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