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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: March 15, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 15, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               porter WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 81ST YEAR, NO. 271 ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 15, 1962-THIRTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO Rusk, Russian Clash t Over Testing by U.S. Press Housewife Shot Couple Sought- BAriTLESVlU.E. Okla. The search for the slayer of a Barllcsvillo housewife centered today on a girl and boy reported near the granary where her body was found Wednesday night. County Ally. Ralph Haynes said three witnesses reported seeing the couple, each about 20, run from the granary near Blackwell, 70 miles from here, to a parked car and speed away. This, he said, was about p.m., about (he lime fixed on the death of Mrs, Bertha Bartholomew, 39, who had been kidnaped along with two of her adopted children. Thg children were released un- harmed. Officers said they were in another room of Ihe granary when their molher was killed. Haynes said the description of the car was similar lo that given of a car seen near the Bartholo- mew house about the time of the abduction. Officers said Mrs. Bar- tholomew and the young children were kidnaped after surprising a burglar in Ihe rural home. A man picked up near Musko gee was cleared of suspicion, was held on an old burglary charge from the Barticsville area. Three-year-old Martin Bartholo- mew, lugging the hand of his ID- month-old sister. Leslie Ann. a motorist to his mother's body in a barn near f'onca miles west of here. She had been shot once in'Ihe head. The motorist, attorney W. W, Dodgers of Blackwell, Okla., said the children were a litlle tired, scratched, dirty and chilled when he found them walking along a hazardous scciioj) of Oklahoma Highway il, about nine miles north of Ponea City near Ihe Oklahoma-Kansas border. "We had difficulty talking with the children." Hodgers, who was accompanied by his wife, "iid 'When we first saw them we thought they might bo from some farm in Ihe area and were lost. A blue, late model car was the Sec KILLING, 1'g. H-A, Col. 3 (AP IMrrphoLol MRS. BERTHA IURTHOJ.EME1V children watched Co-op Is Loser On Oak Creek Cabi By BOP COOKE Reporter-News Farm Ktlilor County Elec- tric Co-operalive losl about on an.Oak Creek Lake cabin thai was never used by the firm, and spent aboul over a four- year period with Impact, Inc., an Abilene advertising firm opcraledjnnd air conditioning unit) cost by Dallas Perkins, a statement issued by Board President 11, R.' Permian Abstract Co. of Midland. Norman who only recently was named manager of the co- operative, said construction cost furnishings, including lin- connection between the (own and the business. The hoard met again at p.m. Thursday and was to. have a hearing with an unhappy share- holder. I.ucian Oilbrelh of Tye, ens and kitchen utensils cosl and bis attorney, David Hooper of and a heat pump (electric heal'Abilene at 2 p.m. Indications Plans Presented By Both Nations GENEVA Secrolary stimulated crises can have on our of State Dean Rusk ami Soviet here." Foreign Minister Andrei A, Ore- myko clashed loday at the very outset of the 17-nation disarma- ment conference. Gromyko denounced as a pain Husk put before the conference a plan for a start toward dis- armament with four points. 1. A 30 per cent cut in rockets, were that addition- (jcnti miscalculations. al shareholders as well as a num- communications Roberts Thursday morning re-'opoi-ative Roberts stressed lhat the co- of Merkcl businessmen would voaled. Roberts stressed lhat the co-op is enjoying its si'calcst prosper- ity in history and lias now taken slops to see thai certain "mis- lakes" made in the past do not .recur. The lake cabin was intended to be built for employes out of an employe fund, Roberts said in the statement issued to the press fol- n two-hour closed door ses- sion among seven of Ihe nine members of the board and two at- torneys. However, the cabin was "huili and disposed of in '.KM... lie fore the board knew" that Ihe cooper- ative's own funds were being used on the project. The cabin was dis- posed of because il was found employes could not handle the Iransnction with their funds, Rob- erts said. Tlie cabin, including equipment and furnishings, cost. Rob- erts said, and was sold for Coke County records show the cabin was sold Sept. 27, 1959, to Elliott Withdraws As Candidate For Education Board Connor Elliott, candidate for the Place 6 scat on (be Abilene Hoard of Education, announced Thursday he was withdrawing his name from Ihc ballot, according lo offi- cials al the Abilene school admin- istration office. Elliotl, who announced for Ihe school boarrl seal on March 8, wns reported by bis office to have left for Colorado City shortly aflcr the announcement of his decision lo withdraw and was unavailable for comment. Elliott is vice president In charge of sales for Master Metal Produqlv.Co. and wns Ihe ninth and filial candidate for election'to the bonrd. He filed for Ihe post only Ivoiirs before March R.dcadlinc. Ihe 5 p.m. Elliott's withdrawn! leaves Mrs. Clntid McAdcn 'lind Ilaymond So- loskj'seeking-the Place 6 scnl. Candidates for sclwol tmard seals include Jnmes Weeks, Keith Wells nnd Cllcn Michel In Plnce 4 find Jim Mtllcrmnn, Klberl llnli and Isnbcl Araur.a in PJncc 5, School board election is lo he held April 7. liari never had any dealings with the much-disputed town of Impncl on Abilene's imrth city limits, lie said the co-op had declined to offer lo sell electricity 10 the town. He said Ihe board had not authorized the ex- penditure with Impact. Inc., (he Abilene advertising firm, but that 11 had been authorized by "a for- mer manager" Dallas Perkins, who owns Impact, Inc., is also here to end all such tests under (ne strict controls. Rusk replied (hat the present snriel LKn thC conference was born amid Ihe 'ftOM k'l" echoing roars of more than 40 (ex- 5l Plosivc to non-mililary and lhat the Soviet Union, m view purposes. of its record, was one of (he least- qualified of .lions to er.Uei. the Gromyko preseu.ed sleeping and detailed plans other measures lo reduce "Ihc disarming Ihe world. ,.isk nf war hy accidcnt- The staled aims were the same, elation, rajjurc cominunica- But the methods differed so sharp- tions, or surprise attack." ly as to revive at once the shadow of deadlock which has hung over all disarmament nego- tiations of the postwar period. Husk called for a M per cent cut in nuclear armed rockets and big bombers and in such conven-. j tional military weapons as tanks! and warships in three years. He' proposed a probibilion on produc-j tion of nuclear weapons and thai' the United States and Soviet Un-, ion each transfer 55 ions nf weap- ons-grade urajii-: peaceful purposes. i Connected will) the plan were proposed measures (o prevent sur- prise attack and for an intcrna-j tional inspection system. Thej measures included aerial inspcc-l tion areas, ground observation posts at strategic points and a, system of notification of missilei filings to prevent the world from] being plunged into war by acci- failure of or surprise at- tack. Leading off Ihe speeches, Gro-. myko called for total disarmament i Bradbury and another member of the law frim, Bill Tippcn, at (ended the Thursday morning ses- sion along with several board members, Roberts; Elmo Jones of Tuscola, C. K. Hill of Hamby, mayor of the town of Impact and Sam fiutmau Jr.'of one of tlie principle owners ofj land there. However, (here is nojScc TAYLOR, Page 17-A, Cols. 1, 2 Judgment Motion Termed Improper A motion for summary judg- ment in the quo warranto case hy Ihe etate against Ihe town nf Im- pact was termed Thursday in a formal answer to (he motion as "improper" because H is based a validating act (hal does not apply to Impact. The hearing on Ihe motion or summary judgment is scheduled April 2 before Dislrict .Indue .1. R. Black. The answer was filed in District Court by the law firm of Kplen. Daniel, Hooper and Dick- son and City Attorney John W. Da- vidson, representing (he slate in the quo wnrranlo action. U alleged lhat Ihe. validating act, passed hy thp 57lh l-cqislfllure, applies only to cities and towns with a population of not more than (i.OOO according (o (he federal cen- sus of 19fiO, and (he slate "denies Hint Impact had any populalion according to the federal census, hence said validating hns no ap- plication lo the issues presented in the quo wnrranto suit." The answer also alleges that the lown of Impact did nol mcel the requirements of the validating net that call for Ihe lown to have ncted as an incorporated lown since, (ho dale of incorporation or nltcmpted incorporation. "Impncl claims lo have been Incorporated on Feb. 13, but no lown officers were eleclcd til the movnnls were purportedly elected ns such at a stnlulnry election held Aug. H, iftfll. for which reason il Jiail not I'unclloncd ns an Incnrpornled town from the dato o( alleged Incorporation." attend the afternoon session. Bryan Bradbury of Abilene, co-op attorney, indicated (hat thejfi'om rockets lo rifles and from! board might seek lo go into "closed, armies and divisions to general session" sometime during the aft- staffs in four years. ernoon. lie presented a draft of a dis- armament treaty 27 pages long, in which, he said, an international 1 inspection system would be insti- tuted gradually as arms reduction proceeded in three stages. )lc put inspection in second place. An accompanying memorandum explained (hal a veto-free inter- national disarmament organization under the United Nations would request from stales information on compliance wilh disarmament measures and il would have no right to enforce slich measures and no right to verify the arms or armed forces retained by a na- jtion. In Ihe final slage, Gromyko said, when nalional armies have been reduced (o a minimum for The slate motion stales lhal Ihe validating act has (he inlent of validating only technical over- sights related to incorporation or attempted incorporalion, and no in- tent is shown lo validate any in corporation which was void be- cause of the failure lo comply, with statutory provisions of incor- poration. The quo wnrranlo action was filed by Ihe si ale in an effort to prevent the (own of Impact from operating as an incorporated city. Although the quo waiTcMlo ac- tion is being handled by attorneys for the city of Abilene, Ihc style of the case is Slate p' Texas ex rel .1. C. McKcc Jr. ct al vs. Dal- ns G. Perkins el al. internal security, a U.N'. peace force composed of national police contingents would be formed un- der a triple with So- vict bloc, Weslern and neutral commanders each having a veto. Husk's pton was deliberalcly in- complete. The specific he made were examples nf steps Banquet Ticket Deadline Friday IWnlod slory Pg. J-B Due to a large number of re- quests, the deadline for purchas- ing tickets lo Friday night's Chamber of Commerce dinner hns been extended to noon Fri- day, CC President Cenc While- head said Thursday. Tlie deadline formerly was set nl 5 p.m. Thursday. Ticket res- ervations may be confirmed by calling Ihe Ctuimber of Cnmincrco at OH .1-72-fl, .laid Whlleliead. Tim 7 p.m. dinner will be held In Rosa Kleld House, he said the United States was pre- pared to (iiko. The complete pro- gram, be said, should be shaped by the conference. British Foreign Secretary ].ori) Home said the proposals were imaginative and far-reach- ing. "Here is our tie said. 'If agreement can he reached on Ihese proposals a major break- Ihrough for disarmament will have been achieved." In his first policy speech lioforo the 17-nation disarmament con- ference which opened Wednesday, Rusk also urged top priority for a treaty banning nuclear weapons tests and said that on this issue. "We stand al n turning point." The United Slates will resume testing in the atmosphere in laic April unless there is a signed agreement wilh Ihc Soviet Union lo block nil lesls. In a reference lo Ihe continuing crisis over Ilcrlln, Husk told Ihc conference that "reduction of len- stnns must go hand in ham) with real progress In disarmament." Without mcntinipinc; (he Rerlin is- sue, specifically, he deplored "Ihc harmful offKt which delllwratcly BLANKET OF WHITE PROVIDES WINTER Lyllc Shores Lake looking oast CASE OF THE MISSING SNOW Ahilene's record snow Wed- nesday was of an elusive na- ture. Overnight more than Ilirce inches "disappeared" and the mystery had nut been fath- omed by noon Thursday. Tlie night woalhcrman did some calculation Wednesday night, adding three sets of snow figures, and came up with a 9.1 inch snowfall for the day far and away Ihe largest on record. But Thursday morning, the chief meteorologist on duty did some calculating on his own. and daylight -wealed (hut the total should have been 5.7. WEATHER nr April Oil Allowable Eight Days Skies cleared and ihc last traces beneficial lo small grain, spring of Wednesday's record-setting, jgrazing and "it will help "millirm dollar" snowstorm rap-1 "There was no runoff and (he; AUSTIN tnr nixl 41. Incl niehl- t-M: Inillkl: CKNTK.Vl. Pair nml uarrnrr IfMlay Clear tn iiartlv liwlihj A lllllf unnurr Frl. my. illnS todav ir.....' In Jl. In 54. Irnliht narornrKT pcaillnl nl HuirilciKv til nnoni (3 prr Ctrl. indies. i TTC mercury to a Tlie melting snow created Wcdnostlay night and Ihe NEWS INDEX "Iciniwrary fallmil" as. plohs of it unexpectedly loose from eaves and roofs splattered on the pedestrian be-l low. Tlie consensus among hank and Agricultural Stabiliralion and Conservation Setvicc officials was Ibal Ihc snow was very beneficial, especially lo small grains. W. 0. Iliggiiis. ASC'K employe, srnd, "That snow was worth n lot to small grain farmers' They had! been worried about the early; killing Ihe nats, but they should know in a few (lays if the early freeze killed Ihe o.its or not. This MIOW will give smalt grain a beosf." K. M. Peiklns, executive vice president of Ibe First National Bank, reported that Ihc snow was melted snow ran across 'M'nl crcatinj; some slick traditionally a low de- Ih hwausc il is then Jackl'ta' many refiners make their rturn-arounds" from winter lo office here summer products and shake down reported highways dear and processing equipment. Thursday. The commission order will mean a daily increase in produc- (ion of -19.3H bairets n day, pri- marily because April has one day I less than March. Pre hearing nominations for iApril totaled barrels n day, down more (ban bar- rels from March. The Bureau of Mines forerasl a demand for Tex- ias crude in April of a (loerease of barrels n day 'from March. Top officials from 25 companies SCCTION A Sports To Your Good Health Bridge Food page SECTION B YVomen'i news Obituaries Buiineii ____ Amulements ComFci Edilorioli Rodfo-TV log TV Ropoit 14 14 16 3 12 13 14 17 17 nppcavcii nalre. answer a   

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