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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, February 26, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 26, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY EVENING, 19-OT-2 svxai svnva I3T3 3AV 3100 Riot Troops Arrive Algiers Terror Flares ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) Ar- mored cars and riol troops swarmed into the heart of Algiers WORLD WAK 1 VETS Discussing business of the Veterans of World War One at a meeting Monday morning at the Windsor Hotel are Roger Q. Evans of Baird, left, Texas Department Commander; Edward J. Neron, center, National Senior Vice Commander of the organization from California, and Albert F. Haile, com- mander of Abilene Barracks No. 1GG7. (Staff Photo by Henry Wolff Jr.) Washington's Arms Open To U.S. Space Hero Glenn WASHINGTON (API-Astronaut John II. Glenn Jr. flew into Wash- ington today, escorted by Presi- dent Kennedy, (or a day of high honors in the nation's capital. The President's big jet plane, flying from West Palm Beach, Fla., Glenn and his whole family aboard, landed at Andrews Air Force Base in nearby Mary- land at a.m The landing was made under low ceiling and short visibility conditions, and in a pouring rain. The weather drove the opening ceremonies, planned for out- doors, into the shelter of a big hangar. As (lie rain kept pouring down, plans for a helicopter flight to cany the astronaut from the air base were canceled and a motor- cade was arranged. Hie presidential limousine and a fleet of other cars wheeled into at a joint meeting of Congress. the hangar 15 minutes before the touchdown of tlie President's jet. Already on hand were Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Castor, Mrs. Glenn's parents, and her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. James Ilosey of Pittsburgh. They had flown from Florida, where they had spent Ihe week- end with the Glenns, on an Air Force jet identical to Ihe Presi- dent's. They took their place in the area of the hangar floor reserved for distinguished guests. H was just as wet downtown but hardier folks gathered early Cease-Fire Due Before Day Out leaders attending Ihe secret con- ference of Ihe National Council in Tripoli probably would hold up today but European terrorists announcement of their acceptance killed 10 more Moslems, virtually under The Ihe eyes Algerian of police, nationalist rebels' parliament was meeting in Tripoli and was expected !o approve a cease-fire with the French before the day is over. This was expected to touch off another eruption of violence by the secret army, enemy of both the rebels and the French govern- ment. In its campaign to block Algerian independence and keep the ter- ritory French, the secret army of peace terms mier Ben Vousscf rebel Pre- Khedda returns to Tunis, permanent head- quarters of his National Libera- tion The French Cabinet already has approved the agreement to end Ihe 7'.i-year war. The 54 members of the rebel parliament have been holding se- cret day and night sessions since their day. arrival in Tripoli last Thurs As Sunday night's session ended, Kerhal Abbas, former rcb-' el premier and a leader of the KLN, hinted agreement was near. President Charles do Gaulle told fellow villagers in Colombey- Sunday staged one of its most daring attacks lo bazooka raid on a French military police barracks in the outskirts. At least I les-denx-Egliscs Sunday that (he 10 persons were reported conflicl may near and gasoline storage tanks within a few days. set afire. French authorities retaliated by moving armed forces into Algiers from outlying bases, but still the killings went on in the crowded street of Algiers. Six Moslems were slain on the) KEHMIT. Tex -Jurors Rue MichcleL Police arrested sanil of European and said he called todav for a re-i one of the attacks. vicw (l( ,esiinlony a rour Moslem dead and one! psychiatrist wounded were sprawled over a' 100-yard stretch of sidewalk op-1 his Odessa high school classmate posite the University of Algiers.! Elizabeth Jean Williams, 17. after Herring Sanity i Verdict Awaiied LOOK OUT Mike Delvin, 17, learns too late the hazards of a pedestrian in the slushy aftermath of a six-inch snow which blanketed Indianapolis over the week- end. Unable to stop the slop-producing motorist, Mike took a seat in the mettin" mncc P moss. (AP Wirepholo) Herring, 18. who says he killed An aged Moslem with a pointed while beard and dressed in a flowing robe lay dead across the street from the U.K. Information along the from Ihe route White of the House parade to the important part in that feller [Glenn) doesn't it? have seen a lot of women with children around the parade so far. I wouldn't bring my kids down on a day like this." Weather had been thn of me of the several postpone- ments of Ihe first U.S. manned orbital flight which Glenn finally carried out last Tuesday. A big jet taxied slowly across .fie field (a the hangar where a red carpet had been unrolled, Capitol. A few dozen were on band behind the ropes at the Capitol Plaza two hours before Glenn was due there to appear First Lady Will Delay Trip Week WASHINGTON (AP) The. White House announced today (hat, because of a sinus infection. Mrs. .John F. Kennedy has been forced to postpone her India-Pakistan the start of trip for a week. She is now due (o begin the journey March 12. The While House said the post- ponomcnl was decided upon on the advice of Ihe First Lady's physician. She has lioon suffering from "a low-grade sinus infection for sev- eral Pierre Salinger press secretary said. The infec- tion has caused an occasional fever, he added, hut the fevers have low. The First Lady was al Ihe air- port in West Palm Beach, Fla.. today to see her husband off on the flight bringing astronaut John II. Glenn Jr. and his family to Washington for n day of honors. Sunday she went water skiing and look a dunking. Sho did not makn the trip back to the Capitol today, slaying (or a few more days in the sun. Kxnct details of Mrs. KennceVs Ilinerary have yel to be worked out, but the delay will knock out (ho'first eight days of her previ- ously announced schedule. She will start the trip with n visit in1 New Delhi, India, and carry on from that point ns previously determined, ending the lour at Karachi, Pakistan, on March 2fl. Tills i.i llio third postponement (4 tlic First fjidy's Journey to Asln. Initially It was set buck from InM Novmnbor iinlll Jnmt- I lien until next month. Mrs. Kennedy had planned to leave Rome for New Delhi March It was understood she probably will go to Rome before leaving for India, but not until later than originally scheduled. Dr. Jnnel Travell. Ihe While House physician, has exam- ining Mrs. Kennedy periodically. On Feb. 16. it was learned, she was checked by Dr. G. W. Taylor, n nose and throat specialist from the Belhesda Naval Medical Cen- ter. Dr. Travell kept in (ouch with tho President and Mrs. Kennedy while they were in Palm Beach (his weekend. The decision to postpone Ihe start of her trip was, reached Sunday. Reid's Condition Kow 'Very Grave' Condition of Dr. A. Rciff, Hardin-Simmons University pres Idenl, was reported to be "very grave" Monday morning. Ocorge Graham, excculive vice president, told the 1I-SU student body In chapel Monday morning that a friend of the family relayct the information on Or. fieiff's condition prior to chapel. Dr. Lindell 0. Harris, head of the Bible department, led n spc cial prnycr for the president, who has been unncrgolnu treatment for bleeding ulcers for Ihe pnsl Ihrcc weeks nl llomlrick Memo rlnl Hospital. He has had sur- gery three timcB since entering the hospital. A cab driver on Connecticut {Service library. A Moslem youih, Ave. lold a reporter en route (ojbndly lhe White House: wounded, A young she repeatedly had asked him (o shout her, must stand trial for murder if the jury finds him sane now and sane at Ibc lime of lhe shooting lasl March 22. huddled by his! Court reporter Fred Swanson man who hadjstarted reading testimony of Dr. "It seems like weather plays an passed just before the attack Clricc at midmorning. The LOW OF 20 TONIGHT A.. All Is Ready What Happened For B.E Dfly To Springtime? Cold weather with occasional.peeled Monday and Monday night. they had been silting on the side- walk watching passersby when they were shot. Oven the weekend at least persons seemed When the plane was rolled resident stepped -stopped, up and Lacks by European and terrorists. Hie Saturday toll was 10, and 26 were reported killed Sunday. Some 800 Moslem students at the University of Algiers went on strike, protesting that police pro- leclion against the secret army terrorists was not adequate. Mail out. followed closely by Glenn. A band struck up ruffles and flourishes and Hail o the Chief. The President and Glenn both stood at attention at he fool of the ramp while the band played the National Anthem. The President and the astro- naut stepped out in the rain shoulder to shoulder to march .hrough an honor guard of Ma- rines up to a small reviowinj stand facing detachments from each of the armed services. Glenn's alternates in the space venture also had been flown here from Florida. Glenn walked out. alone to shake hands with the commander of Ihe Marine color guard, then returned to the President and his family. They quickly climbed into the presidential bubble lop limousine and drove away without further were to be 5fi killed in what indiscriminate at- transcript will take at least 70: minutes tu read. The cate went to the or freezing drizzle lias put: at p.m. Saturday. Jurors delib- erated until p.m. and then were granted a request to ad- journ until today. delivery men coninucd strike for more protection which they demanded after seven posl- men on their rounds were shot last week. Informed sources said Algerian CLASS B CAGE DRAWING MADE AUSTIN' llawtey will meet Koxton and Aspcrmonl will play Quitaque in opening round games in the state Class B basketball tournament here Thursday, lluntington will face Kyle and Snook will play Santa in other first round games. smial spring weather Siib.frccy.iiis temperatures IOB' a" for of Monday and Monday night pose a threat to flowers, trees and shrubbery which have bloomed under the ii.fluence of the warm weather o[ recent days. A moist cold front came bar- Harsh Cold Teacher Event Annual recognition of Abilene's jpiiblic school teachers com- mences its agenda Tues- day, starting with Business-Edu- cation Day and concluding wilh the Teacher Appreciation Ban- quet. Putjlic schools will be closed while an approximately 730 teach- ers visit 70 Abilene business firms, BANQUET AT 6 P.M. degree drop in temperature by I t f 3 a.m. At 5 (he temperature was I HI A lflV3f Tlle at four and bv fl a.m. it had skidded lo; IIIIU I teachers will receive Teacher oE 30. Between 5 and 6 a.m. it i lhc nw''mls- 's set for 7 eight degrees, from 48 lo! THE ASSOCIATED I'KKSS lhc n'6h gym- I Deep cold spread rapidly I.mvor temiwratures arc in pros-, Texas .Monday, ending springlike! lne at which Dr. Gr.v peol during the rest of the day j weather and endangering Jolly. wl." is jointly jwilli an expected overnight low of 20 to 25. Fog enveloped Abilene earlv 13 Colleges Open CLASP Tonight Monday morning, so thick that oh- jccts were barely visible a block i away The fog lightened during ding fniit trees and Tender by Chamber of IntiiJii in the norlhrn half of Education Committee and the P-TA organization of each scbonl. stale. The Weather Bureau issued a eold wave warning for .Northwest and North Central Texas in which j'5 Business Education Day also sponsored by the Education jthe day. A (race n'l moisture Predicted zero tempcraUiresjComjrmlcc. recorded at the Abilene Weather I lhe Monday! Dr. Dun H. Morris will open Bureau. .night. rjay with a talk to teachers, Eastland received .3f> of rain Headings of Ifl to 30 degrees j Mowed by remarks by Supt. A. were forecast for areas of XorthiE. Wells. Teachers will then di- Central Texas. into groups to visit business By mid-morning the to learn more about the ceremonies. The automobile had they will attend :he bubble up to shield against' Abilene alumni of 13 Texas col- leges open their local fund-rais- ing campaign for CLASP Monday evening with a dinner at Abilene High School cafeteria. Presidents or high ranking officials from al least 11 of Ihe 13 participating schools have no- tified General Chairman Sam Hill Ihe rain. After a private luncheon with capital dignitaries at the -Stale Department, Glenn will retire with his wife and two children, David, 1C, ami Lyn, 14, to their home in suburban Arlington, Va. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which op-' crates Ihe Project Mercury space venture, has changed its mind and called off a Glenn news con- ference here. Ahead of Glenn arc n ticker- tape parade in New York on Thursday and n welcoming cele- bration Saturday in his home town of New Concord, Ohio. In the future, too, may be a tour of the country and a trip abroad. Kennedy ami Johnson discussed Iho matter over the weekend, 1ml Iherc has been no official an nounccment. Sen. Clifford P. Case, H-N'.J.. n member of the Senate Space Conv mitlee, has suggested an ex change of American and Russian astronauts tu a possible first step toward cooperation between the Iwo counlries-ln space. The dinner is set for fi p.m. Guest speaker is Dr. Dan Proc- ter, president of a Houston en- graving company and f n r m e r pci'sidcnl of Oklahoma College for Women. Actual solicitation begins Tucs- [day and runs through March Two progress reports will be held, on March 5 and 9, said Hill. Participating in t h c CLASP (College Loyally Alumni Support Program) arc Abilene Christian College, Hardin Simmons Uni- versity, McMurry College, Baylor University, East Texas State Col- lege, Southern Methodist Uni- NEWS INDEX SECTION A To Your Good Health Obituarici Sporti Buiincn Oudook SECTION B Edltorlpli Woman'i newi Amutamenli Comlci Rodto. TV 3 5 11 2 3 4 S i 9 received .30 of rain overnight Sunday from a thunder- storm. .Sunday and Monday morn- ing heavy fog covered the city Ifelalcrt Story, PR- '-A but a brisk wind Monday morning of the icy blast was deepji'isks, cosls and achievement of was blowing lhe fog away. I within lhe stale. {business enterprise. Ranger received .20 during thei thermometer drnppd H-E Day is being directed by versify .Southwestern University and il was misting and at Fort Worth within anjJ. K. Uiigley. Transportation morning. I 60 to 48 degrees. ifrom Alls lo host firm will had shoved' Heavy thunderstorms the companies. down 48 de- "''e arrival of Ihe cold blast in1 "Teachers and businessmen will Texas College, Texas Chris-sv there Monday tian University, Texas Tech. Trin- Rv a-m- tnc t ily University, 'university of Tex- Jt'c as ar.d We.st Texas Slate College, grocs from Sunday's high of 78. Keprofcnlmg Hie schools will bpj Chief Mrteorologisl C. 1C. Silch- Dr. Don H. Morris, president ofjler al Hie Abilene Weather Bu- for alher pi'csiclenl i Monday and Monday night with AC'C: Dr. Gordon Hennelt. pre.si-jreaii said the forecast calls dcnl of McMurry; Dr. and much colder weji Graham. Worlti Dallas. Dallas-have a chance lo tetter under- was drenched with 1.16 inches of, 'stand each others' rain and Fort Worth .71. Other rainfall included Ronham 57; Crandall :57; Ciarksville .72; and Idabel 1.23. i-ongloy explained. At lhc one teacher fl'om K'eh level of pri- mavy. intermediate, junior high A freexini: at Also. Dr. William K. Truax, [loan of student personal service, East Texas Stale: Dorsey McCroy. assistant president at Texas Ai-.M: Amos Melton, assistant chancellor at TCU; Dr. Graves I.andrum, assistant chancellor at the University of Texas; and Mar- shall L. Pcnnington, vice president at Texas Tech. Dr. Procter will be introduced by Morey Millcrman, CLASP vice chairman. Dr. Procter, president-of OCU for 15 years, also is n former president of the Oklahoma Educa- tion Assn., director ..of the Assn. of .School Administrators of Okln- homn and vice chairman of the Oklahoma Slato Board of Educa- tion. Hill will master of ceremo- nies. Dr, Bennett of McMurry will give the invocation. of II-SU; Dr. Durwood Fleming, {continued cold Tuesday. Occasion- president of Southwestern: Dr. ,r.l or freezing drizzlo is ex-j northwest of Furl Worth, glazed James Cornell, president of Wesl Texas- Stale: Dr. Monroe Carroll, as.sistanl president of Bay- lor: Bowie son'or will receive certificates of excellence. As is WEATHER jtrees and shrubbcrv wilh'ico The a award will so rfo. 1" Ihe "Teacher of the Year" schools. The presentation will be nvnda f, S. DMMKT.MIONT CO1IMI (HfJlhrr MK'n. I'.iir 3 A) AM) VICINlTv rnlli'M Cloudy anil niuch roMiT Mm- :Iay Monilav CimlintlfHl mill temperature grccs during hours. Dalhart. in to 28 rie- lhe carlv muniin g Ihe upper !by Woodrow F. Watts, chairman die, shivered in lO-degrce weath er. Amarillo had 18 degrees. Both jol Kduc.ition Committee. Entertainment will be provided by, the Cooper High choir. Mor- and cities reported a trace of snow. prc.cn( Mnn.Uj 71-lmir af's1 Biircau issued "''jw.Tvc warnings for Northwest Texas and portions of North Ccn- tral Texas. The Weather 5 a.m.: 78 nml .10. Ilillh iii.l linv sJiiir -Hi war: 72 .in.l II. l.isl nrnritc Mflav: sunsi'l lonisht: NOI1T1I CKVrll.M. TKXAS CuM t ar.il south. Ckiu Ic-.lay Ti I uiul ;.....7... ix-fiiskMui iiimi iri-fiiiii! rain nr jlpji' freezing temperatures La NCM r.otlrr, anil ocviulnnal lUMl ruin In Thursday adc.-roon. [onlkhl 19 In In 3vl En Iliuh Tu.'.Mlav a In nralh'K'M. Bureau has fore- the Icons in lhe y riSlil with pins to several teachers. Speaker for the banquet will Gen. Hans Christoffcrsoti, com- manding general of the Danish Army. [o in all of slate. Occasional below g., injStock Market .he northern half of the ActlVC, AdvanCCS lighl snow is forc- Iri (x'f.islonal rain In r.i.t. .iptl In sonlri altrnmon. llirnlna rtHil- rr loiljy. rolrler and 'rues- dav. Ijw lunivhl 24 In nnrtliML.il In 4u in ll'.lli 29 in tumhuol In Ib In (CHiUivnNl. .VOnTHWFXr. TBXAS fold for thn Panhandle wilh lighl drizzle possible in Iho j-nulh iwrliou of Norlhwcslern Texas Monday nighl nifhl. en comrr 1 iN'orlh Central Texas is to ex- perience lighl rain or frciviiii; as the rcFrigeralcd air spreads across Iho slate, NKW YORK slocV market advanced in active, early :vliiig tixlny. i American Telephone rose VI, Standard Oil (New Jersey) dropped >i nl SS, and U.S. Slcol gained !i al Chrysler N, tlcnerat Motors wns off and Ford was unchanged,   

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