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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 25, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 25, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               tlNPAY "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 81ST YEAR, NO. 253 ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 25, 1962 PAGE Associated Press FAST BOMBEH This drawing shows h ow Hie B70 Valkyrie bomber will look when it takes off for flight tests at Palmdale, Calif., later this year. Six huge jets in the tail will power the 250-ton craft. More than one billion dollars has been spent on planning and construction of the first three B70s, amid argument that the. money should he spent on missiles. A passenger version would carry up to 150 peoople. (AP Wirephoto) ejects Plan t Talks VIET NAM DISPUTE Reds TOKYO (AP) Communist] Under the IKil treaty: China declared Saturday its se- (dividing Viet Nam, foreign mill-1 curily is seriously affected by anjlary personnel in South Viet Nam! undeclared war" being waged [was limited to men. but the! by the United Stales in South Viet: United Stoics last year deter-! Nam and said U.S. military aidimined upon a major buildup when' i to thill .Southeast Asian country it became evident tlia! a .similar cannot be allowed to continue. 'limitation in North Viet Xarn had! i ti Similar charges, that its violated for y rity was menaced, prefaced Hertj Robert Kennedy Assures Germans on U.S. Stand Britain and the Soviet Union. China's large-scale intervention injas cochairrnen of the Geneva con-j Korea in November 1950, after American troops had reached the Yalu River border tot.ween Ko- rea and Manchuria. The statement by the Red Chi- nese Foreign Miuislrv broadcast fcrence. have special for supervision of ilie treaty' terms. The British in a recent reply to a Soviet com- plaint against the United .Stales, said the rebellion in South Viet: Kennedy Urges Alternate Plan By JOHN' M. HinilTOWKK WASHINGTON Kennedy Saturday rejected Soviet Before the letter was dispatched it was checked by Secretary of Slate Dean Husk. At some point MltS. JAXIK rl.KTCHER to ISra'iil By JOHN 0. KOKH1.ER BONN, Germnny F. Kennedy Saturday foresaw the eventual reunification of Ger- many. And on the touchy issue o( Berlin, he declared again the Western Allies will fly the Soviet- menaced air corridors to the iso- lated city "no matter what hap pens." Relafed slory, 5-A here from Berlin, after taking one last look at the grim wall the Reds built to divide the city, and the subject was still on liis mind as he faced a news conference. "I was very touched at the re- jception I have received here The U.S. attorney general Germany, especially in Additional Troops Four Into Algiers By ANDREW ROROWIEC ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) The French government poured li'oops into jittery Algiers Satur- day following a terrorist blood- patli that left 20 Moslems dead in the populous European quarter of Bab-el Oued, Eleven or move Europeans were killed throughout the city and the over-all Algerian death toll was set at 40. Authorities, etc, 3rd graf InlS. afternoon in Bali-u] Oned as "or- ganized murder." They said the killings were of a rightist secret army plan to dash hopes in a racial war. The Moslems, many walking through Dab-el Oued to their homes in nearby Moslem quar tors, wore shot down by pistol- firing Europeans. Shots came from tiie street, doorways anrt balconies. Women, some holding babies, watched the killings from windows and balconies. Troops welded themselves Jn rings around the quarter and im- posed a 5 p.m. curfew that banned the inhabitants from leaving "until further or- ders.-" tempt to loreslall further out- breaks. Troops holding guns at the ready scaled off the teeming Mos- lem quarters of Belcourt, Clos Salembier. Climat de France and the Cashah to guard against a violent Moslem reaction to the killings. Runners of the rebel Front of National l.iljeration spread the word through the Moslem sec- tors that calm and discipline should be maintained. "Do not get yourselves pro- voked by nerves of was the word. hc said. "I was inspired by the courage shown and by llicir (West by Peiping radio, however, do-'Nam was "fomented, organized manded immediate internalionalland in pail supplied and wholly consultations "to eliminate the se- rcius danger of war in southern Viet Nam by peaceful means." It also demanded the irnmcdi- dirccled" from North Viet Nam. The Red Chinese Foreign Min- istry said the United Sla'.cs was "preparing for waging three kinds; Berliners') dedication to and equipment. ale withdrawal from South Viet of wars, nuclear war, convcnlion- Narn of ail U.S. military war and 'special The statement objected rai'icu- Before meeting with the to creation o! the new U.S. "This state of affairs cannot be- allowed to continue. Tim Chinese! In his reply Kennedy moves and possible So- irushchev's charge that eountcrmoves in the diplo- government holds that the co-j HOUSTON   reunificalion can be President Xgo Dinh Diem's about. The United Slates has no anti-Communist army of about magic formula for reunification as long as the Communists are opposed." Asked what information he had about changes in the Soviet Union he replied: "Only what 1 read in the newspapers." Keruiedy was asked to explain the legal status of the U.S., Bri- tish and French civilian nil-lines flying over Communist territory to Dcrlin if the Soviet interfere in the three air lanes allotted by wartime agreements. Lines ol French troops deploycdl ,hink is n through downtown streets, where life went on as usual. Thousands of shoppers roamed the streets and .sidewalk cafes were busy. In tlie barricaded iiilntinislra- must be determined at the time." he replied. "There is a question whether lives would be endan- gered. no matter what hap- 175.000 men. The U.S. force, which includes three Army helicopter compan- ies, is not a combat outfit. the new command could form framework for combat if necessary. The Americans orders lo shoot back if upon. "This Panhandle. She leti her (0 (hc I daughters Houston hume Salur- Utay on a flight to Itio De Janerio, 'where she wilt .spend three months learning Portuguese. I Then she will sally forth (o jhelp develop the Brazilian Extcn- Ision Service. i "I'm not really a member of1 'the Peace Corps." she said. "I'm .going as a member of Ihe N'alion- al -Ml Foundation, which is under contract to Ihe Peace Corps." She will be a home demonstra- tion agent. She will also he the oldest member of Ihe Brazilian mission. Mrs. Fletcher was retired last for- cials here Friday night, that Mac- capita! Sat-imillan and Kennedy had dis- urday. Acualiy, the. State Depart-lcussed their latest messages to monl sent it in early afternoon.IKhrushchcv by telephone. IDEA DISCUSSED Glenn on Tour Peiping said statement, "is bv PAI.M BEACH. Fla. Prrsident Kennedy ivas rejwitcd Saturday to have discussed with year after 2J years of agricultural p Umcheon fon the possibi ln'iy iii.iiexlensinn work for the state. Hi-laled stories, Pg. 3-A yesterday with Vice means merely one for military assistance, but nn operational command of the U.S. imperialists for direct participation. "The United States openly indicated that U.S. militaiy will shoot back if shot al. men: This! lion building overlooking the city, mny officials feared the in the history of Ihe 7'i-year-old war is approaching. worst NEWS INDEX ones Oil news SECTION B Rodio-TV loss TV Scout Bridge news SECTION A The qunrler, one nf Algiers' To Your Good Health! most explosive for racial is inhabited by poor workers, many of Spanish and Uali.nn origin. The violence began early in Ihe afternoon when a Kuropean taxi driver was shot and killed by n Moslem. Quickly, any Moslem Been on the streets was a target. I-atcr, long columns of trucks and armored cars moved into oth- er points of Algiers, taking posi- tion at Die limit between Knrn- pean and Moslem sections in at- 4 8 .10 2 2 4 S Dycss Fix Page.......... 6 Editorial: SECTION C Women's news SECTION D Sports Church news Farm news, markets .1-17. .1-4 9 .10 slwws liens, the flighls will continue.istalcs military clarcd Nam." As for the Atlantic Treaty Organization. Kennedy said there are. misunderstandings nt limes. "I think tlie remarkable thing is thai this NATO relationship j has held together under so much pressure and during great crises. All Mr. Khrusrchev (Soviet pre- mier! has to do is whistle ami everybody (on his sidei stands at attention." Kennedy said. lie said he felt the Western sys- tem had a much better chance than the Soviel system of surviv- ing future tension. Kennedy, who flew in fact that (he I'ni'.cd is already in nn 'unde war' in southern Vie' I Berlin with his wife and younger bnil'ncr. F.dward. was the luncheon guest of Adenauer ial Palais Hie chati- 'cellory, after their talks. .of sending Johnson. ''I wasn't going to sit .iohii II. Glenn Jr. on a "They discussed the whole doing nothing." she snid tailly. will tour of the nation. program I think the She remembered seeing some' There were signs, too. Umt'subjoel of what Col. Glenn could bulletins sent lo all Home Bern- fjU'iin might be tapped for n w'thin the United States, at migration Agents in Texas seek- in order to cash in "lc great demand for ijig volunteers for the Kiviziiian Stales on his feat appearances cities." missijn. She promptly applied I Kennedy is Hying Glenn and she was accepted. Six1 But thp assistant White HoiiM'jGU'nn's family lo Washington !spent six weeks at National -i-ll press secretary. Andrew T. for another big reception j Foundation headquarters in Wash- chcr. said nothing has includes an appearance for lir.gton, D.C.. learning settled yet on sending Glenn o'.H 'he spaceman at a Sena'.e-House in.17.j customs, culture and hiMoiy. Iho country. Rut be ssion. Hatcher said he was un- Mrs. Fletcher has two children, a news conference (here iniphtiahle to say whether the speech her daiighlei'-Mrs. Tom Belcw of-lie something Monday on a trip will make to members of Houston and a snii-Carney.overseas. Congress may shed light on Fletcher of Bnytown, Tex. This filled in with indication.''travel plans. She already had a unod hack- from a news conference Glenn j The Glenn schedule was left ground in home demonstration l.old Friday that some travel'open at Ihe astronaut's news con- work. She started in the field may be shaping up. jfcrcncc in Cape Canaveral. Fri- after her husband died. She' Kennedy and Johnson lunchetltday. served in Baylor, Waller and Car-.together here Friday after they, Glenn was asked whether ha son counties. had taken part in a gigantic had any plans lo go outside this She has lived in Panhandle come for Glenn al Cape or any objections to heing .since when she transferred al. Fin., the take-off spot for as was Soviel astronaut I from Ilcmpstead Tex. ,triple orbit of the globe last'Yuri was sent on (RN'Sl IJallin-.incorporate into the building fe.i-l shc n .jrydiui.f.-and jlrips to'other nations, ger's proposed community center I lures which will make it usable Texas Woman's Uni-! In a manner thai imlicaled hei Glenn replied thai he didn't U'ersi'y in IVnton. She toured had no doubts al all. Hatcher told Ihink he was qualified to and ,'IK :i ri'ixirters Saturday that: "I think on tiiis but added: "We squeaked through by a IM vole for all occasion--, here from margin Saturday. Bond money will be used in LONGSHOREMAN ARRESTED Largest Amount of Pure Heroin in History Seized NEW YORK (AP) Police and federal narcotics agents reported seizing a lironx longshoreman Saturday night with what was said to be the largest cache of pure heroin ever seized by police in this country -id kilograms valued al an estimated mil- lion. The longshoreman wns Identi- fied as Anthony Kuea, 31, of 1171 Bryant Ave., Iho Bronx. Deputy Chief Insjwclor Edward F. Cnrcy of (he city narcotics six city detectives and five federal agcnls nablxxl Fuca arrested on the same as he was leaving a cellar wi" Ihe narcotics in two canvas-type airline bags. charge. Carey said Fuca has been un- der surveillance 2-1 hours a day Carey said lhc confiscation he was freed on hail, "licynntl doubt Ihe largest ever! Police said Kuea lives in a five- made by any police department story apartment building with his in the country. At the lime ho was captured, Fuca wns out on bail set by a Kings Counly court ill con- nection with his arrest last Jan. Ifl for alleged possession of 11 kil- ograms o( heroin, police said, Other members of his family nlso! wife Barbara. 30; their son, 0: and a daughter, fi. The police said they began in tensive surveillance of Fuca be- cause the automobile in which the 11 kilograms were found had so- crcl compartments (or a greater (limntity. Voters, 5-10 strong, lion of tlie building Of Ihe bond issue to finance (he coslj nine of Iho proposed SSO.OOO center of the kiildiiii the future of Col. Glenn may have to discuss some things domestically was discussed al the like this in ihe future." '2R2 in favor to 25R Saturday's vote was considered fairly heavy. The center will be located on Crosson Ave. near liallingcr City Park. Tlie air conditioned build- ing's dimensions will he SO x Ififl fod. and i! will he of masonry con- struction. In the from (if (he. building, a section, -in by no feel, will contain n large dining room, lobby, con- ference room, kitchen and real rooms. 'Ilic rear section will contain a gym-typo building na by 12') feet, which will be' large enough for automobile and stock shows. Fold- ing blcocbor scats uitl be able to seat persons. Chamber of Cnmnierce officials will mi-et with C. P. Parker Mon-i day morning to rnnlimir plans for }lhe center. First plans were made jfur tin: center more than a year, ago, and since then a committee' has studied potential uses of Iho building. Among Ihe objectives o! the planning committee has been lo UALLINGKH'S I'HOI'OSKI) COMSIUNITY CKNTKIl approved by voters, 282 to 258   

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