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Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, February 20, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 20, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 20, PAGES IN U.S. Astronaut Now on Orbit Trip m Glenn Reports Everything Working Well, View Good CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. John II. Glenn Jr. rocketed into orbil today in his, spacecraft "Friendship 7" at a.m. Eastern Standard Time, anil scientists planned [o bring him clown after he circled Ihe earth three limes in four hours, 50 min- utes. As Glenn soared toward his GLENN UP IN THE MORNING regular day at the office Glenn Had Rood to Capsule CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP H. Glenn Jr. today kept a personal dale with destiny, a date ho worked unswervingly toward for a long lime. In all ways since his selection BS a Mercury astronaut three years ago, Glenn drove himself and determined to ride into space and contribute to man's knowledge. So far as anyone could tell, untiling could corrode his nerve. All Ihose postponements, including the benrtbrenkcr of Jan. 27, when he spent 5 hours and 13 minutes strapped down in a capsule Itiat wasn't going any- where, could have unhinged n les- ser man. But not Glenn. Modesty also stood out all over Glenn's make-up during his long training. In vain, he pleaded with the world to take the spotlight off him and his family and focus Glenn said. "If you have successfully controlled your air- plane in an emergency, or dealt with an enemy whose prime ob- ject is to dcslroy you, your chances of making the proper de- cision the next lime are in. creased." In every possible way, Glenn drove himself hard lo prepare for space flight. Worried about his weight soon after his selection as nn astronaut, Glenn regimented bis diet and exercise and slimmed down from 195 pounds to a mus- cular 165. Always very close lo his family, Glenn nevertheless decided early lhat the Mercury program was so imjxjrlant he would live in bachelor quarters at Langley Air Force Base, Va., seeing his wife ami children only on weekends. The wife, Anne, David, 16, ami Carolyn, M, live in a comfortable rendezvous wilh Ihc stars, he re- ported by radio to Mercury con (rol center a! Cape Canaveral (hnf "1 feel fine and lhe view is tre mendous." He said he could see the Atlas booster rocket falling away be hind him and that he had a clear view of much of lhe earlh stretch ing back to the Cape from his vantage poinl aboul 100 miles in space. "it's a beautiful Glenn exclaimed. The reports came from the con trol center here, where officials monitored the historic flight of lhe first American to be fired into orbit. Glenn's space capsule was blasted skyward by a powerful Atlas boosler. The massive rocket, generating pounds thrust, performed perfectly and with pinpoint pre- cision, boosted the spacecraft to the proper speed and altitude for the mission. wirrphoio) Officials reported lhe capsule was in an orbit ranging from a high point of IGO miles to a low of ]00 miles and the speed was ,530 miles an hour. Estimated me of each circuit of the globe as 89 minutes. As the rocket rose skyward, lenn, acting like a tine test pilot, iporled on the condition of his struments and of himself. He lid forces of eight times the pull gravity worked on him during :e peak acceleration. After reporting the fallaway of 10 booster, he radioed lhat his naulics and Space Administration confirmed that orbit had been at- tained. H was planned to bring Glenn down to a landing 800 miles south- east of Cape Canaveral at approx- imately p.m. 'flic launching came after sev- eral frustrating postponements dating back to Dec. 20. Several lechnical delays today slowed Ihc scheduled a.m. launching for more than two hours. Glenn Home Said Joyful Over Shot on the worthwhile things to bclhome in Arlington, Va. done, and learned, up there in the skies. Why was Glenn, a family man with fwo children, willing to risk his life in a space capsule whirl- ing about the globe at miles an hour? "We've got to do he once said. "We're going into nn age of exploration that will be big- ger than anything the world has ever seen. "People are afraid of the fu- ture, of the unknown. H a man faces up to it and takes the dare of the future, he can have some conlrol over his destiny. That's an exciting idea lo me, belter than waiting lo see what's going lo happen." Glenn, a "1 Ihink it's good for John to bo said Mrs. Glenn. balding 40-year-old Marine lieutenant colonel, wanted desperately to be the first Ameri- can space pilot. He lost the call on the first two flights lo Alan B. Shepard Jr. and Virgil I. (Iris- torn. For each of these brief sub- orbital flights, Glenn was backup astronaut. Ho rated his backup experience, in which he worked closely with Shepard and Grissom for weeks before each flight, as invaluable for his round-the-world orbit mis- lion. Also invaluable was his experi- ence AS a combat pilot in World War It and later in Keren. lie shot down three Communist MIG fighters In the final days of the Korean War, and after one dog fight returned to bnse wilh more than 200 bullet holes in his plane Ho won five Distinguished Flying Crosses and an Air Medal with II clusters. After the war he became a lop test pilot. "Experience In dangerous nn and and father into space flight. As for the tense early moments f lhe lifloff, the Rev. Frank A. Jnrin, pasior of the Knllf United Presbyterian church which ne Glenns attend, told reporters: 'It was quiet; everybody had his iwn thoughts." Mrs. Glenn and the two cliil Iren, David, 16, and 14, with everal friends and neighbors vatched all the proceedings on brce television sets in Ihe living Mm. Reporters, photographers and TV crewmen gathered on thc awn to walch the launch on monitor sets. Erivin came put (o report what vas going on inside. He said as lhe launch proceed- ed nobody said was no time lo say anything." Asked if (here were any irayers, Erwin said, "There were some prayers I am sure. No ver- The astronaut talked lo his wife and children by telephone from the space capsule itself as tic waited out (he countdown for his orbital flighl. The gravity forces which gripped Gienn on liftoff, making us lean, trim body feel eight imes heavier than its normal 165 xwnds, vanished suddenly when he capsule entered orbit. The pressure was gone and Glenn be- came weightless lhe buoyant eeling lhat results when a ilcli- ale balance is achieved between he outward pull of centrifugal orce and thc downward pull of he earth's gravity. Glenn was lo be in this mys- erious weightless condition for mosl of lhe remainder of his light, unlil Friendship 7 rc-cn- cred lhe atmosphere en route >ack lo earth. A major goal of oday's flighl was lo determine man's capabilities and limitations n that weightless environment. It is a sensation future space ravelors must-learn to cope wilh far days and weeks at a lime. Putting Glenn into orbit docs not necessarily make the mission success, however. Slill ahead lay a critical period of re-entry al completion of the Ihrce orbits. A trio of reverse al the base of (he cap- sule were to be fired by a signal rom an automatic clock aboard :hc crafl as il approached lhe Coast of thc United Stales near (he end of the (hird circuit. If all fire properly, speed will be reduced enough lo take lhe capsule out of orbit and enable it lo descend gradually lo a land- ug near Grand Turk Island in lhe Bahamas. Because Friendship 7 was Irav- eling five miles a second, il would miss the intended impact zone by five miles every second of error in the clock. Or, if only one or two of the rockets fired, he would miss lhe area by hundreds of miles and recovery would be more difficult. After firing of the retros, Glenn then had to rely on the complex spacecraft conlrol parachute and landing systems and the far-flung recovery forces for liis salvation. Or, as in the case of the orbital flighl of Enos, (he chimpanzee, last November, Irouble could de- velop in lhe capsule and the flight be terminated early. At a.m., the Kano, Ni- geria, station made contacl and jjv- reported lhat the mission seemed to be tjoing as planned. The Kano slalion said Glenn was in "excellent voice" as he passed overhead. II also reported that Ihc astronaut had eaten his first meal in space al about this period and had exercised the manual conlrol systems in the capsule. Glenn carried Iwo tubes of a ON GOES THE SPACE SUIT everything ready (AP Wire photo) mixture of beef and vegetables which he squeezed into his mouth through an opening in his helmet. He was high over the Indian Ocean tracking ship at a.m. There, lie passed suddenly from daylight into darkness and in a period of about 45 minutes he bad (raveled from winter in the Unit- ed Stales to summer over Ihc fn- dian Ocean. Halfway through Ihe lirst orbit, Dr. William Douglas, medical of- centcr at the listed in "critical" condition Deported Glenn was in a Hcndrick Memorial Hospital'; normal 1 proceeding in excellent condi- tion." As he passed over thc Muchca, station, Glenn con- 1 versed with fellow astronaut l.e- Dr. Roiff underwent surgery foriroy Gordon Cooper Jr., who was .he third time in two weeks at (he! following progress of the flighl in Dr. Reiff Critical After 3rd Surgery Dr. Evan A. Fieitf. president of Hanlin Simmons University. was: !cer al thc in "critical" condition al Hemlrick Memorial Hospital' Tuesday morning although h i s physician described tiis condition as "slightly improved" from Mon- Au nisht. )al ones." He said everybody was ex ;icmely happy at Ihe perfect ifloff, relieved that it had gone all right, and relaxing a bit as later accounts came in, Young Dnvid had a world globe, charts and a stopwatch lo track lis father's flight. Mrs. Glenn, 41, a pelilc bvu nolle in n red wool skirl ami olack jersey blouse, sat part of the lime in a child's rocking chair watching the screen. hospital Monday nighl. Tho most recent operation was to Mop the internol drainage discovered Sun- day night. The II-SU president was in surgery for over three hours. The 5-1-year old administrator first underwent surgery for bleed- Australia. Glenn lold Cooper lhat everything was going well and he a'so repelled seeing much cloud cover over the Indian Ocean. INTO THE CAPSULE finally to work (AP Wirerhoto) He told Cooper he observed a j cluster of very bright lights lie- low. He assumed these were lhe lights of Perth, where everybody I in town planned lo turn on their ulcers on tcb. 6, The SCCOIK! s in hopcs that operation on Feb. 13 was per formed lo stop (he internal hem- orrhaging lhat followed. Dr. tieiff resigned his post al If-SU on Jan. 25, lo become cf- feclivc July I. Stock Market Mixed, Active NKW YORK slock market wns mixed in aclivc ear- ly (railing-today. j Gener.il Motors wns up 'IV Erwin, n family friend, snicl Ihc and Chrysler were Glenn family hns n very fiwitn- mental faith, not only n spiritual faith but a fnllh In nil Ihc people conducting the project and faith In John reflected such exuberance nnd assurance In the whole thing." unchanged. Du Pont sank Montgomery Ward dropped nnd Helhlchcm rose Smnll sains were innde by Easlman, American Telephone, Pennsylvania Railroad nnd U.S. Steel. see them as he whizzed overhead. Glenn said: "Thank everybody for turning them on." Technical troubles and cloudy skies delayed the launching. WEATHER U. S. PKT.VHTMKNT OF COMMKKCE WKATIItn H1IRKAII (Nrntrifr mlp. I'Mr 10..M AIllt.KNK AND VICINITY (HacHu.< 40 iiHrA) cLou.ly through wilh a .cw shower: 70. Iw In Ihc lr High W'nlrclday arouml "0. Ilich on 0 it.ni.i 61 r.n.1 low same data lait anil 29. Sunset last nlirtti lunriie suiufl toillthl: N'OHTll CCTpUI. TKXAS Clmuly Icxlav anil WMntsilav. (Vcaslonal IIBh rain .ind iTAttorcd jclnn'Hf In louth Today, sprraalnx nvei arra Innliht and rqnllnulnx A lonhtih TAW t 62, Huh Wednesday H-W. M Kennedy Pleased by First Phase of Glenn Orbit Shot WASHINGTON (AP) Prcsi- lent Kennedy watched the lininch- ng of astronaut John II. Glenn r. into orbit today nnd was de- wibcd as very pleased that llif irsl phase oi the flight had gone iff very successfully. Press secretary Pierre Salinger Taid Kennedy paid rinse attention. The President, with Mrs. Ken- nedy al his sido. began watching Ihc launching preliminaries at a.m.. on a television set in' To Your Good Health his Imlrnom. Kennedy conlinucd Bridge (o watch in his bedroom until a.m. lie then svenl lo thc small din- ing room on Ihc first floor of the White Ihnisc to join Democratic there for their usual Tuesday .blastoff, a direct telephone ling morning opened lo Cape Canavcrnl, A small pnrtalile set was kept Kirst Salinger talked with 0. on picture, with (he sound turned; n l.loyd. information officer of National Aeronautics and Space Agency, who was al Cape Canaveral headquarters. llie President took over phone aboul (hrcc minutes before the launching. l.loyd filled in Ken-' 2 uiedy on some of the details. Al ixiint. Kennedy heard Glcnn'3 .voice over the phone but Salinger down, while Kennedy i-ith thc legislative leaders. Fifteen niiiiulcx before NEWS INDEX Obituaries SpOfU SECTION B Women'! newi..... Amuicmcnfs Comiei Rodio-TV 6 J said (he president did not speak I with (ilt'nn. '3 I Some of the legislative leaders i moved chairs around Iho portable 'sol in Ihc dining room to watch 9 (he but tho President congressional letters who were TV Report 'remained slomling.   

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