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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 16, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 16, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               otter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 3100 00 Ml I H 81ST YEAR, NO. 244 ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 16, SECTIONS Aisociatftl Press (ff) Western Pilots Use Red-Coveted Route MUCH MAIL Katliy Jo Wilson. 4, opens one of the more than 600 gifts, let- ters and get-well canls she has received since a picture of her was published over the country. The Crawlortlville, Iml., girl broke her right leg and doctors put both legs in traction. Katliy was taken out of traction this week and is now home but she will have to wear the cast for three more weeks. (AP Wirephoto) Typical Airman Found in Texas SAN ANTONIO, Tex. The typical man being trained to- day for Air Force service is a slender, young high school grad- uate who is a bachelor but is thinking seriously of marriage. Specifically, he's airman basic James E. Maynard. 19, flight IBS of 37C6II) Basic Military Train- ing Squadron at Lackland Air Force Base. Officials a! Military Training School Headquarters at Lack- land pinned the designation on Ihe Williamson. Va., youth after surveying hundreds of thou- sands of trainee records. The average Air Force Irainec. [he survey showed, is 10 years old, slands 5 feet B'.i inches tall, weighs H8 pounds, is a high school graduate, has no depend- ents, wears n size B'i shoe, has a 30-inch waisl and wears a 15- inch collar. Maynard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Maynard of son, matches every facet of trained as a mechanic when description. !nc completes bnsic training. Prince Sees King of Laos LUANG PRABANG. Laos (AP Souvanna Phouma had 90-minulc audience with King Sa vang Vathana today, lie to! newsmen afler emerging from th palace he gave n report on talks lie had in Geneva last month wit Prince Doun Oum and Print Souphanouvong. He added he will continue thes talks with Gen. Phoumi Nosava here in Luang Prabang. But Phoumi, strong man Boun Oum's royal governmen has nol given any indication h GLENN TO GO Tuesday Earliest Oribt Flight Date Kchitcd slory. Vg. 10-n CAPE CANAVERAL, Kla. (API, United Slates' effort to' rocket an astronaut aroundi thej The postpmiomenl w world ,s now off until next Tucs- by the Project .Mcrcurv Opera the of'tiojls Direr-tor W-iitcr' C Wil bad weather in the Atlantic re- liaim, ader 'anollier midnight covery areas. by his weather And Marine Lt. Col. John hail compiled tepoits from Glenn Jr. will still be Ihe astro-.weather planes and ships sia- naul despite the procession of tinned in Iho "splashdown" areas delays which mighl have cracked. The announcement said simply: the confidence of thc aver- "Weather conditions preclude 'a launch allcnipt this morning." age man. Glenn has shown no signs of :cnsion that might affect his per- formance and there is no basis "or considering his replacement, Dr. William Douglas, personal physician lo Ihe astronauts, said ,otI ay. "I'm as close to this man as 1 im lo my Douglas said, 'and I couldn't let my brother fly if I thought he would be in danger. If 1 detected anything wrong. 1 would take immediate action." Douglas reiterated that Glenn lias complete confidence in Ihe program, is an experienced test pilot and used to such delays. This was the 10th postponement since the flight was originally scheduled Dec. 20. The further delay was an- nounced at a.m. Eastern Standard Time today at a weather briefing by the National Aeronaulics and Space Adminis- tration. In addition, the NASA spokes-! 'nvaracion Lopez, 2fi Fighters May Patrol Airways BK.m.IN Informed sourc-l.was reported lo have made the es .said Western military from Hamburg, (backing up a protest to '-'nmmercial planes kept regular j flew lo isolated Berlin todav in I i above the alliUide the .Soviets set j corridor whose lower levels lliejfor lnc lower-level operations. Soviet Union wanted lo reserve There was no immediate [for its own planes, any incidL'iu. iwas bad. j The Western Big Three was re- 1 This time Ilip Hamburg-Bel scinti fishtpr Pa' cnrridor. norlhcnimosi of lliri-e thc corridors unless So- Mich links, was involved It runs uet biixzmg Allied mil- ncro.vs Communist lerrilor.v toi lUll'-v nllli cnihnn lr'lfflc' lhe area of thc'liril-i ,Tlw Sovicu accused nf beating nhoio-ish .-used of playing a "reckless and danger- jo'.is" game by Allied officials jby thc Sovic; harassment. U.S. officials in Washington ex- pressed fcai Ihat a dangerous situation could develop rapidly it tlje Soviets keep up their nir an- lics in lhe 20 mile-wide corridors (linking Wesi Berlin and West JGeimany The United Slates.. Britain and j France in sliff notes to Moscow Thursday charged the Soviets i with "aggressive and dangerous sheriff's olficc. and officials from fit into a pattern that pointed to behavior" and warned thc Allies Crusby County, where Lopez was thr- newcomer lo Ballingcr. Hc was; charge in connection with the se-i Martin Martinez. 21-year old'. "llcn 4th Man Charged After Ballinger liv CLYDE FOSTr.l! 5 The f iiu rt hilocatcd. vcre beating of an elderly malli is' ger .service .station operator last'ijou of SB.000 on charges of office Wednesday. week and the search for thc as- ccssory lo robbery. Deffido Cava-; Lopez was taken before :wcre determined to protect their ghts to dear air pa.-sagc to this tin miles inside Commu- territory. United Slates govern- lhc l.'.S. note by Hun-7.0.s. 2U is being" held m, "ai .n.siice Cone i.nlv "cccs'ilr-v insure c. -Sllmff charge of possession after bems returned lo'Ballinger.1 "f sual M'shtS Sheriff Atkins said Fred !lc wlls He waived an examining trial aircrafl) Ralhngcr. father of an-las a suspect in lhe assault hut has'and sol lhe bond al man in the investigation. ,M.C11 of any actuul parti InerU lesponsible for the conse- was charged Friday with aiding aljn tho as talm as t r. of any incidents which fuoitive lie Dealing ;charge was explained !o him occur." 1 Alk'i's sard Lopez was taken was told of his rights in Soviets five times in (lie sailanl was filed Friday nels Cuiintv zos. al, of olter of M. E. Boggess, who remains fast-disappearing chances of (ne ing a coalition government. Flying from his headquarters a CAP Wli JAMES MAYNARO fits lo a "I" The Air Force looked over Maynard, a 1961 graduate High School, is of Xieng Khouang, lhc neutralist leader was met by an imposing array of eight cluding the American and Soviet. Gen. Phoumi Nosavan, deputy premier of lhe Vientiane regime, was also at the airport. The king has designated Sou- will be checked all over again Si'avc condition in Ballinger with trie rounciy. in Atkins said that in his formal iheir air rights lo isolated Berlin, from top to bottom despite'thc'pital. jwhich SSOO was taken. The Ixipez lold of hilting.iejccled the Soviet requests and N'ol Likely In Live said the family has been kin, trainees al Lackland to find Williamson Maynard, who enlisted Jan. dark-haired, raddy- with tho understanding that he'll IcomplesioKcd yonlh whose hobby is wood-working. lie worked al a machine and electrical company in his home (own before enlisting. He is engaged to Miss Anna Mae N'npier of fact expected to lake him out of the "no dependents" category before Dutch Get Jap Apology TOKYO (AP) -Japan apoio- vanna to form a coalition govern- menl. previous exhaustive checks. Because certain electronic par in both lhe missile and causulojioid'chai there isYlniosi" had been activated for lest man will sun poses in Ihe previous checks. on thc hcall will have to be replaced to insure! peak performance. Further, there is a stror lihood thai llw attitude control system operated by hydrogen peroxide jets, will have to he re- too long. Maynard has no complaints gized loday to lhe Netherlands for a1'011' lhc rigorous basic training a riotous demonslralion which apparently has sian students staged against the his appetite. He has gained one pound per week, an- other area in which he matches Ihe average Air Force trainee. Dnlcl) Embassy in Tokyo Thurs- day. Shinsaku Hogen, director of the Foreign Office European and Af- rican Affairs Bureau, expressed deep rcgrel in a visit with Dutch Ambassador N.A..I. De Voogd at the Netherlands F.mbassy. Ytijiro Iscki of Ihe Foreign Office called in Ihu ncsian ambassador, Maj. Gen. It. Bambang Sugeng. and told him Ihe students' action was improiwr. Stock Market Opens Irregular NEW YOHK (AP) The slock so market opened irregular U. S. Sleel was off '.i, Chrysler General Motors off and up General Electric up 'i. Itadio Corp. was up as. American Tele- SugenR replied he would do his'phonc and Ford were unchanged, besl lo prevent such incidents iniStnndnrd Oil Jersey) eased sensing a move Us chop away at :had only about HO in his oi ,lle hemi theisairi each flighi would have to be sion at :hc tune of Ins he picked up in the sta- cleared indreidu.illy by the four- no chance, ;lion. The Ballin; i power air safely center in Berlin. iff said Ibiil while in: Despite lhe earlier Allied re- had informed sources said the 51 man will survive the two nc said inal while in' IA-J-PIH- me uarner amea ;s. on thc a f.ojiez lold officers he six-ill the Ballinger Upez had informed sources said t 'remainder of the robbery loot witll (hc (_-aVazos again asked exclusive it Lopez was arrested "I1cl ;l" moved to Ballmger (roriilloday of lhe Hamburg-Berlin c I1S nighl al Farmer about 35 miles'0'11' hc Wednesday inlHnhstoHii alxiut two years ago. Lo- nrior below 7.500 feet for Ihr northeast of I.ubbock, by Run- nels County Deputy Sheriff Eskell Lubbock. Atkins said the cor- Ihrce :pff a resident of Rohstown- hours cldor recently. Infoimntion on the Soviet air- U.S, Indusfriai Production Down WASHINGTON in- dustrial production declined slight- ly last month from the record lev- el of December. Figures issued Thursday by the government indicated Ihat the business recovery hesitated in anuary. Onlpiit of the nalion's u mills and utilities dropped slight-l Hearing Postponed On Preston's Suit Scheduled hearing on a motion1 lo dismiss a pending; 42nd District the horizon while on his flight. Glenn was once more awakened by Dr. William Douglas, and ad- vised of (he prolonged Thai wag at a.m. Douglas quoted Glenn. 40, asi u. s. or man. I'aer 2-lt) AMI VIUMIY Hull A tip that iicul cousins an insurance matter. plaj'ing in n siring hand in Ihej-------------------------- il.ubbock area led to his arre.-t. Powell said ho "excel- ileiu cfxipcralion" from !aw-cn- commenlingr guess it was be expected. We all knew weather was marginal." the future. ly. So did olher key indicators, such as personal income, retail sales, nonfiirm employment and the working hours of factory em- ployes. Automobile assemblies slipped 10 per cent from Ihe near-rccoixl rate of December. Output of final products and industrial ma- terials fell below thc December level. The Federal Reserve Board said the industrial production index went down one point lo 1H per I'.i anil Wcsiinghnuse dropped H.1 ce.nl of lhe 1057 average. Court case againsl thc Cily of Abilene was not held Friday. In the suit. Kobcrt Preston of Abilene is attempting to force re- payment of a legal fee lo local law firm authorized by a former cily commission, llcar- agencies in the1 l.tib- suspect. He had special praise for "'r' I Fletcher Slark, Crosby County Reiff's Condition Remains Critical A sheriff and members of Ihe Liib- n.olls provident still1 clo.-e In a Koya! Air Force plane cn.'-rying Sir Christopher Steel, 'Britain's ambassador in West Germany. The Western notes declared any attempt by Ihe Soviets to take over "exciuMVf! of flight lev- els for any period of time is en- unacceptable" Thc maneuvers were de- mri.-iir. KaiuriLiy. in..... lonithl .1.1 lu Ilitli TKXAS l.v Irxl.iv r.r.ij S.n Ni> imrcil. i deparlmi'ii1. and office, along m.-mbers la In M lo 71. I.IHV icnijhl fiu" ir. Clc, ill critical al al Hospital allliniigh in lias reportec! Dial Dr., posi ciiK'ralivc convalcs-i is coming along s.itisfnc-T cribcil as harassing tactics. ing of the city's motion for dis- missal will be held al a later date, according lo Judge J. Black. .r .101 i.an'; of (lie Department of Public stationed in lhe l.ublxick arca.lHcjfc Huh CjlltOct kno''s" ns "The came to Bnllincer about two I 'I he surgeon IK weeks bffoic the roblK-ry. lie hadjnol anticipate much change in (lie1 been in the .service station on year old college pre.sident's iJday niornina lo purchase until Saturday a! which; iu, a lin-.c some impruvenu-nl is antici-! 45 In U Hie ToljTUVYKST TKXAS rir.lr lit al lh.it time, roweli said, j Al Il-St'. prayers liinetiorn of-. Atkins said first twcamf'feri'il in various classes and the; the pres-j K. a in the case uhcn hits of I Baptist Smrient Union for th a'i fviticucc picfed together bcgnn lolidcnl's recovery. NEWS INDEX SECTION A. Obituaries............ 1 SporU 8-9 TV Report........... 10 Radio-TV logs......10 To Your Goad Health 10 Buiincti Outlook...... 10 Amusements........ 1 Bridge ......11 SECTION B Women's news 3 Editorials 4 Comics 5 Was Mexican War Black Page in U.S. History? By ASSOCIATKI) 1'KKSS Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's comment Ihat the U..S.- Mexican War of lfMG-18 was un- justified has tmiched off a war of Texan rebuttal the strongest. Tlits was a cninpalcn which won territory from the Rio Grande to the Pacific for thc United Stales. Mexico opposed U.S. annexation of Texas, which threw oft Mexican rule in IBM, and resisted when lhc U.S. sent troops into n disputed region he- twccn Iho Nuccca liivcr and the Hin Grande. The Mexican War was brought tip by a student al Jakarta, In- donesia, during Kennedy's visit, The wlttdcnt mentioned, lhe war in connection with the Dutch-In- donesian dispute over West New (In men. Said Kennedy: t would say thai as far as the war with Mexico, although there might be some from Texas who disagree, f would say we were unjustified. I don't think thai Ibis is a very brighl page in American history." Commented Gnv. Price Daniel of Texas: "1 cannot believe thai he (KennedyI intended lo leave the impression thai hc disap- proved of the heroic fight for freedom nnd liberty which was made by Tcxans in I83B lyeur of lhe Alamo and Texas independ- ence) and lhe subsequent annex- ation agreement and defense (hereof by the United Slates." Daniel noted Ihat eignl Mexi- cans died fighting on the Ameri- can side of (ho Alnmo. Former Maj. Gen. Kdwin A. Walker, a native Texan who quit lhe Army in a dispiilc over troop indoctrination, said of Kennedy's statemcnl: "Devastating and un- pardonable." David Donald, a history pro- fessor al Princeton, and a Pulit- zer Prize winner in mid-19lli ccn- lury American history, com- mented that 23 ycnrji ago most U.S. historians would have agreed with Kennedy, Ixit nol r.ow, The diary of President Polk, Donald added, has been discov- ered and there has been belter research into internal Mexican affairs. Donald said the war was "made almosl Inevitable" by American expansion and the fact that Mexicans wouldn't negotiate iotig-standinR differences such as claims by U.S, citizens vs, Mexico, and boundary disputes. Col. John Tiakclcss, who was on the general staff in World War II, aul who is a wrilcr and historian, noted that Gen. S. Grant also thought the war unjustified and said so in his memoirs. As for himself. Bakeless said: ''The Mcxicati War, whether jus- tified or nol, was more or less America was expand- ing. I think myself Ihe cruelly of thc Alamo justified almosl any- thing." In Ihe siege of lhe Alamo (San Antonio! the Mexicans wiped nut the entire gnrrison. Al Han Marino. Calif., hisloi ian Allan N'evins said he disagrees with Kennedy but says Ihe at- torney general's position is tena- ble. Continued Ncvins: "It's one o( those questions that will never lie settled. The general view of his- torians used to he thai it nhe war) was wrong. .More rcrcnlly, lunvever, historians have taken the opposite view." In his own opinion. Xevins said, "I think the war was justified." His principal grounds: "The re- fusal of Mexico lo negotiate. The Mexicans (nought they were go- ing to defeat the llniled State's. They had an army that on paper was fivc times larger than ours. The principal reason they refused lo negotiate was national pride." Ncvins noted thai historian .Ins- tin H. Smith lakes the view, in his Iwo-vnlume work, The War With Mexico" (published abnul M) years agol, thai Mexican prov- ocation and intransigence made it imrxissible lo avoid hostilities. Xcvins said the same view is taken by Kay Allen Killingum in his 1'jri "Westward Kxpanr-ion" in which hc emphasized thai President Polk truM very hard for a [H'aci'ablc scltli'menl. .N'evins added: "The attorney gcr.eral. of is quite en- titled to his view, which is the old Ihe traditional view in Massaclm- sells." .NVvins said the Mar was gen- erally opposed ill Massachusetts because it w.is regarded as a .Southern war aimed al acquirini: more territory in which Mould be practiced. Xevins said Abraham l.inc-uln also opiwst'd thc war. though it was supixirlcd in Illinois. N'cvins said Lincoln even introduced a resolution in I'orujrccs asking PrCMdcnl Polk lo say exactly where Mexicans infringed on L'.S. The resolution was dc- fc.iled. "The prciwr.dei ance of opinion now upholds the American Xmns concluded. Oanic'l. in additional com- ment, said: "1 am Bind that of- ficials and cilizcus of Mexico In- day arc among the ho.st friends thai Texas and the United Stales have. And that most of thorn nn- der-land thc true causes of liino past conflicts." As a ivMilt of the Mexican War, tin- I niti-d Stales got Inc dis- Texas land as well as wtut is iiiiw Arizona. New Mexico, Cal- ifornia. Xcvada, Utah, and a part of Coloradu. The U.S. nlso paid Mexico million for areas. I   

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