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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 10, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               Rep lira W09 X8 03 orter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOB WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 81ST YEAR, NO. 238 ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 10, 1902 PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Aisocialed Preu Oilman, Financier B. A. Duffy Dies B. A. (Barney) Duffy, C8, Abi- lene oilman and financier, died Friday nt 7 p.m. in St. Ann I liis pi til I. Doalh followed an illness of aboul Iwo years. Funeral details will be an- nounced by Kikcr-Warrcn Funeral Home. Final rites will be at Sacred Heart Catholic Church with burial in the mausoleum at Elmwood Memorial Park. The family has requested Ihat remembrances bo made to Ihe Cancer Society. Mr iino Mrs. Duffy have been Abileniars since 1826 when they built the home at 1102 Sayles Blvd. where they since have re- sided. Surviving Mr. Duffy are his wife, Merle Hart Duffy; a (laugh- ter and granddaughter, Mrs. Hope King and Melanic. bolh of 183-t Elmwood Dr., Abilene; two broth- ers. Jimmy Duffy of Mangnm, Okla., and Neil Duffy of Amliorsl, Tex.; and one sister, Mrs. James Burke, Oklahoma City, Okla. Mr. Duffy was u native of Man- gum, and was born Aug. 18, 18U3, the son of the late Mr. anil Mrs. James Duffy. The senior Duffy, an Oklahoma banker, died aboul six weeks ago. Mr. and Mrs. Duffy were mar- ried Nov. 25, 1915, in Mangum. After college at Sacred Heart, Shawncc, Okla., young Duffy went into professional baseball. He was B. A. DUFFY rites pending (fie Helena, Maul., leain briefly before the Pittsburgh Pi- rates purchased him in 19H. He was a pitcher with the Pirates un- til 1919, when he quit ball to go into Ihe oil business as an inde- pendent operator. His first oil company, organized (hat year at Wichita Falls, was named by him Ihe "1910 Oil Co." Ribicoff Said Senate Candidate NEW HAVEN', Conn. (API- Secretary of Health, Kiiucation and Welfare Abraham A. Ribicofl assured Democratic leaders here Friday that he is definitely candidate for the U.S. Senate nomination. Key leaders, who did not wish to be quoted by name, said the former governor gave this assnr ance at a meeting at the home of Democratic National Commit tecman John M. Golden. Ribicoff met with Golden, Ma yor Richard C. Lee, anil othei key party leaders in the area. Some of these leaders quoted him as saying he was an active candidate for the nomination and would go all the way, to a pri wary if necessary, to win it. The meeting at Golden's was not open to the press. Rib: coff was in New Haven to make a speech at the Yale Medical School. Ribicoff himself declined to comment on what went on at the meeling. And he declined to tell news men whether he is or will be a candidate. He said his only concern now NEWS INDEX SECTION A Amusements 2 Bridge 6 Sports 4-6 {Shortly after he started the firm; was lo get President Kennedy's he went to Burkburnctt lo open that great oil field. In 1925 Mr. Duffy helped de-j Parly leaders said he told the velop some oi (he first oil (hat the leaders of boll Callahan County Putnam. Then he and his familyjington are being very cooperative moved to Abilene lo headquaiierin moving Ribicoff's legislative Obituaries Oil news SECTION Church ncwi Women's news Comics Editorials TV Scout Radio-TV Io9t Form news, market B 7 9 2 3 5 6 9 9 10 hclpjiogislalive program through Con ;ress Reds' Nuclear-Race Superiority Feared AF Plane With Seven Aboard Down HAMILTON', Bermuda IAP1-A U.S. tanker plane wilh seven men aboard exploded in Hie air likei a yellow ball of fire and crashed' into the Atlantic Friday near Bermuda. An Air Force said Ihe KB50 plane was reluming to Kindley Air Force Rase from a refueling mission when it ex- ploded. The spokesman said no para- chutes wtre seen after the explo- sion and it was assumed none of the crew bailed out. The initial report of the crash il was plane said idem ified as a yellow fireball his business. Mr Duffy through the years discovered or helped bring in several oil fields. He had large oil holdings in llaskcll County, in I program to an early conclusion so that he can get away. Congrcssman-al-Large Frank Kowalski of Meriden is the only announced candidate for the nom- Nolan and in Tom Green County. ination. Much of his oil operations through two companies. Duffy! Greenwich is Oil Interests and B. A. iCandidate for Sei- OILMAN, pg. 10-A, Col. 3 'third term, Prescolt Bush o[ the Republican in- is an announced re-election to a No Indictments Returned As Grand Jury Recesses The 104lh District Court grand jury inquiring into alleged activi- ties related to Ihe Taylor County Jr., 21, nf 1309 Sewell, bolh charg- ed wilh burglary: and Billy J. 1s- bell, an inmate at Ihe state pris- turning any indictments in mat'crs but with word to Judge sheriff's office nnd city police- son, forgery and passing, men recessed Friday without rc-j District Attorney Tom Todd aid lhc case of I. D. Farmer, 50, charged with habitual check swin- dling was passed. The grand jury was laken on a tour of county jail by Sheriff J. D. Woodnrd and Chief Jailer .lake iWasson before Ihcy officially rc- Owen Thomas that it plans lo continue the investigation. The jury uclviscd (tie judge lh.it It would like lo meet again Feb. 26, March 8 am! March 15. l.eroy l.angston of 10 Harvard PI. said Ihe special inciuiry will he continued al (lie future ses- sions. 11 was understood the panel may meel the full week of Feb. 26 wilh one day sessions on the other dales. Judge Thomas talked briefly wilh lire grimcl jury, which re- ported four indietmenls in crim- inal mailers. He said the pane! will he in session until March when a new jury wi ed. Indietmenls were returned Fri- ccsscd. 'niroughoul the lour mem- bers of the panel asked several cniestions concerning (he opera tion and other working policies. Todd said after the jury report- ed lo Judge Thomas that he was satisfied wilh the progress made so far by Ihe panel. Lnngston said the jury had no public statement to make concern- ing what it may have learned. day in the cases of Hilly Eaves of Athens, forgery The district attorney said be impancl-lthc jury reconvenes Feb. 26 it will continue investigation of the sher- iff's office and "any other law Rny and passing and check swindling: Wil- liam Ray nor Dowdy, 17, of 350 enforcement official, for Hint mai- ler." He did not elaborate on (he statement. Sheriff Wodnrd was asked his Peach and Robcrl Gordon Bond reaction by newsmen. r Rc.sl Rending Sunday la lit illje Abilene -A- 490lirs Firsi Training Phase 490lli Civil Company, on .irlive rlnly rU Kort (Icrdrtn, Tla., i- winding up lln? lir-I (if Irjininp prngnim nnrl gflltnp fur a nru' jark Mnldrn of llie IVOlli v itli rlory jiml pictured, in Sunday's Re'jiorlrr-iVcus. Valonlitic Season 'f'lie is marked nn llic fovcr page of thr Xl'ornnn'p Srrlion uith ol louplfj Hlifj.-'e an1, armnunrr.il thi< iscrkcml. Beta Sigma Phi Sweethearls arr fraiiim! in n pirlnrc .M'rir.s in ihr1- Serlion Slirulny. Tnsidc the Women's Srclion Jtminr Hifliliflm Jrffrrann Irieie regular popular fratiirci Sunday. Basket lmUt Track and AH the Latest Sports "You mean what do 1 Ihe sheriff responded. tic was told. "There's a lol of business going n." he said, "but f haven't been up there. I'm glad they (the jury) are investigating and I wel- come an investigation any lime." The sheriff was asked if be might have anyone lo offer Ihe grand jury as witnesses. He said he has "lots of them" and lave them available any time the ury might want them. After guiding the jury panel hrough the three story jail, jascment and grounds, Sheriff iVoodarri (old the panel he was inppy lo have them investigate lis office and visit the jail. "We arc trying to do lhc best AC he said. "We have noth- ng lo hide." The county official said he wish- every grand jury would visit he county jail. Before the jury recessed Friday Is members heard from six persons. Sallic Mac Williams of Abilene was the lirsl person called Fri- day morning. She was followed by Floyd Hickman, also of Abi- lene, who was chiseled with the panel until noon. Also appearing Friday were Johnnie Mae Cook, a county jail inmate awaiting transfer to state prison; Willie Foxworlh of 533 Booker T. Washington: E. (Pole' Rcardcn, former jailer; Deputy Sheriff Garland N. Elli- ort, and Pablo Garcia of 10CO Locust. A register kept by lhc jury ba- liff showed 12 persons issued sub- poenas were not called, Most of those were persons in an official capacity wilh Ihe sheriff's office. Members of Ihe panel making the report lo Judge Thomas wilh Lnngsion were Mrs. W. R. Sibley Jr. of 1118 l.eggclt, Howard I-aney of Tyo, William If. VanCloavc of Tiiscola, Mrs. Dorothy Bnuller of Ovnlo, Stanley Smilh of 1305 S. Pioneer, R. U Dunwoody of 2302 Sylvan Dr., Lesley Beasley of Trent, Mrs. John DcFord of 3142 S. 10th nnd Noble Touchstone of Rl. I, Tuscoln. C. Jennings Jr. of 2133 Syl vnn Dr. was unable lo mecl with Ihe jtiry Friday afternoon. Mrs. W. S. J. Brown of Merkcl was which split in Iwo" fell into the sea just aflcr 110011. The plane, filled wilh a boom in the lail and capable of refuel- ing three jet aircraft al once. xiscd at England Air Force Base in Louisiana. It was a unit of the 622nd Refueling Squadron. Kindley field lifeboats and priv- ate vessels, logethcr with planes and helicopters from Kindley, icarclied Ihe sea for possible survivors and wreckage. England AFB al Alexandria, La., identified six of the crew as: Capl. Rowan J. Fallow. 38. St.j Cloud. Minn. I Capl. John B. Tracy Jr., 2oJ Syracuse. N.Y. Cant. Gnincs G. Wiltwiiks, 30. Decatur, On. T. Sgt. Era P. Ilorton. 3G, Mem- his, Tenn. Airman i.e. Guy I.. Powell, 2G Pnyallup, Wash. Airman 3.C. Ralph E. Kculzel 10. Fremont, Neb. Identity of (lie seventh man stationed at Shaw AFB. S.C., was nol available. AWARDS I'KOGKAM Junior Chamber of Commerce Friday night honored the outstanding young farmer of 1901 in the Stamford trade area at an awards banquet. Taking part were, from left, Farced Hassen, Jaycee presi- dent.; Mrs. Kenneth Ilansen, Lueders, wife of the honoree; Hansen; and Bill Pritdiard, Ihe 1959-60 honoree. In background is Orbie Lovvorn, chairman of the awards committee. (Staff Photo) Lueders' Hansen Named As Outstanding Farmer By HOB COOKK Repurlcr-N'csvs .Farm Editor STAMFORD Kenneth Han- sen, 29. a l.ucdcrs row-crop farm- was named Stam- ford's Outstanding Young Farmer Junior Chamber of WEATHER nighl ronlimifii" inilii M '5 SOUTHWEST TKXAS Cl I Ilirouali of at Commerce banquet. Friday al the Cliff House. The award was presented overeating Bil! Prilchard of Stamford, pient of the honor in 195T. the year the Jaycces inaugurated the program. There were live other nominees' for thi- award. They were Gerald Vnsek. HI. 3; Bobby Jones; Lynn While, lit. 3: Clement Rich- ards, lit. :i: and Fred Osmcnl.! HI. 1. nil of Stamford. Kach of (In: young farmers was' Wichita Falls Record-News, now front-page columnist for the pap- er. Shelton enumerated some of the things which make America one of the greatest nations in the world. "It is one of the few nations in the world where more poeple die than from starva- Romney's Decision Due Today He nnd Mrs. I.ovvorn will ernor of He also said Uial Communism s not the greatest enemy facing America, but Ihe extreme right iving element among its cilizeiv U.S. Testing Said Needed For Victory By LEWIS GUUCK WASHINGTON' U.S. disarmament chief said Friday" new information on the 1961 viet atomic tests shows the Redsi with another test series, might1 pass the West in Ihe nucelar arms race unless the West tests too. The disarmament agency di' rector. William C. Foster, ex- pressed particular misgivings hat the Soviets might come up 'irst with a missile able to shoot lown attacking intercontinental missiles. The development of such ai anti-inlerconlinental ballistic silc by the Soviets without a com- parable western advance n the opinion of many western strategists, greatly alter the pow- er balance in favor of the Coriv. munists. Foster's statement highlighted a day of continuing controversy, over the nuclear test issue which saw these other developments: Soviets remained silent on Thursday's proposal by President Kennedy and British Prime Minislcr Harold Macmil-. Ian for a three-power foreign isters meeling on hailing the nut. clear weapons contest. At thl same time Moscow roundly cri- ticized the United States and Britain for their moves toward resuming testing in the atmos- phere. Said Pravda: "The whole world has become aware of the 00 .Michigan. latTompany Mr. and Mrs. 5., president of Amer- ilo where next Corp., has promised he will compete in a statewide L decision on his political future The agricultural production of .his nation gives il one of the greatest weapons against any na- tion o[ Ihe world, including Rus- sia, he said. tlanspn is a native of thp_ Lued- ers Community. He is Ihe son of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Hanscn, who live on a farm north of Lueders. He married the former Miss Yvonne Hnndrick of Albany in 1931. They have two childrc-n Reeky, 9, and Bryant. 6. Hansen operates a 600-acre farm, of which 550 acres are ir crop land. He began farming for himself in 19H. He owns three raclors. practices conservation 'arming, including terracing, chis- farming on the contour and applies proper management ol crop residues. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, president of Ihe Uioders Homecoming Assn. and a member value of the hypocritical state- ment by the leaders of the west- ern powers about their concern over nuclear radiation and about their alleged clesiro to spare our planet from nuclear explosions." of the Slinckelford County Committee. cuntcsl by the Texasj.j[ Chnmhcr nf Commerce lhc outstanding farmer in in (ntliy I i 'j Chief speaker was "I. a.m. news conference Michigan Republicans no bones of hoping (or a and are suggesting glib' success could lead lo absent in the Iwo Langstnn advised day session, Triom Strike in Paris Is Aftermath of Riot Shi-linn, former editor of the QQP presidential nomination 'in IW4. Romney is a devout man who holds nn office in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Snints equivalent to th.it of bishop. Me returned to his h.-.me in sub- caiiphlj Tlio strike call drew wide snp- of nol only from Communists, Orgnni-lbiil also Socialist By nODN'KV ANGROVK lie-.! against alleged police sav- PARIS (AIM Presidcnl in controlling the riot. :lc Gaulle's government, 'join-con I error txmibs right-wing Secret Army Mlton ami Communist-led riolcrsjliomm, Inlxir jccd 0, lcM, onc contended I-nday with n from students, and was monthly by his church, an the first of other strikes and dcm-.has been a practice of his before on.strntions lo major personal or busi of nithe rint. ASC The Soviet government-con- trolled newspaper neglected to say (hat Russia first ended the esl moratorium with a series of n-the-air blasts last fall, which the western leaders now say is justification for western tesl re- sumption. De Gaulle govern- ment announced it would not join in Ihe U.S.-British appeal for foreign ministers meeling. And it said the 18-oation general disarm- ament conference starting in Ge- neva March H, in which France a listed participant, shows litr, lie promise of bringing about "a positive contribution to the prob- lem of disarmament." The French have long main- tained Ihat true disarmament would come not through a hall to testing nuclear devices, but Ser PfT. 10-A, Col. J Professor Says River to Blame Bv JERRY PIM.ARI) AUSTIN (AP) fessor at Texas A geology pro- urban Bloomficld Hills Friday from n busy day at Michigan's Constitutional Convention in l.an sing. Ho is n delegate to and a vice president of (lie which is alU'mpling lo rcwril the stale's basic law of 1908. Intimates say Homney began a Thursday and said he jwould seek "prayerful guidance." cows died in 1912 from drinking sally waler in the river. Tech told the The Colorado River Municipal Railroad Commission today lh.it jWater District is asking (he com- tlie Colorado River "is a fine lo force operators in the ample of a river which is Ridge and North ample laminating itself." The Railroad Commission end- ite ed Friday its Iwo days o( hearing that stalled much of Paris foi hour. The strike was the rc.sul ness decisions. chain of violence led from! Another strike was called for the government's efforts to lhc rio1 victims peace in Algeria. The Kuropoan scercl army is nllcmpling (o defeat Algerian in- dependence by terrorizing its foes wilh plastic bombs. A Communist- lo be buried. Among tlmsc joining Ihe one- hour work .stoppage were movie rictro.ss llrigitle Bardot, who re- Ranch fields to eliminate the usi of salt water disposal pits and plug two abandoned nil wells. Mitchell nnd Scurry counlics. decision probably will nol be given for about six weeks Dr. John Brand he had laken various waler ami soil sam- ples along IV.c river. "The malter of nalur.il contam- on whether salt wnlor disposal E. A. Crowder, testified that as pits should be eliminated in far back as 56 years ago, water n Ihe river became sally enough lo kill fish during dry spells. said he had drilled several water While Hi.mney kefH plans to himself, spcculalion in- creased (hat he would give up his wells in Ihe area and found Ihern all lo be salty. K. V. Sponi-e. general ol Ihe district, told the commls- AMC lo enter full- tiine. The AMC board of directors crntly spumed n secret army de- conferred wilh him for two hours led demonstration protesting gov-jhu ernment failure lo suppress the V.idim. secret nrmy erupted inlo a bloody mcclin'i for funds; (lien provisionally scheduled three-hour battle Thursday night bfllwcon Paris rinl police and thousands of in which eight persons were killed and hundreds injured. The wnlkotit Friday was in pro- movie director Roger a special meeting for Monday _in They attended n at which lhc sccrel array was assailed in spoeehcs. City and .surburban bus service nnd much of Pnris' business and industry halted. Subway and sub- urban train services were hin- dered. the event that Romney decides to become n candidate. Romney Uns indicalcd he would step down ns president and board chairman of AMC it he chooses to run, but would retain his shares of stock in the auto firm. inalion is much more serious than sion water pollution ft rjvfr "has to be eliminated be- fore we can build a million dam." Knrlier fhree ranchers area of the Sharon Ridge oil lieldj The hearing on the to testified that the river lias been sally long before the field was discovered. Willard Oladson, a Snyder drill- ing contractor, estimated Ihnt at least 25 per cenl and maybe 50 to Ihe pollution of Ihe Colon make lhc operators stop using pits and to ping the wells is In its second day. v A hydrologist said ThursdBy pils and oil wells are contrlbutini per cent of Ihe wells in the field will have lo bo shut down if Inc. Railroad Commission enters im order prohibiting the use of sail wnlcr disposal pits. Loyd Hollcy snid he had lived In lhc area 66 years. He said M River. Kd Reed, consulting hydrologM for the Colorado Water DUlriot, said lhc polutlon WM comiaf from the pits both from turfMt flow and seepage Ihroucn formations.   

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