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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 9, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 9, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               gfoflene Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT YEAR, NO. 237 ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 9, 1962 PAG Associated Prea (ff) MCKNIGHT SAYS U.S. Press Must Take Off Gloves SAN DIEGO, Cnlif. R. McKnighl, Dallas newspaper1 executive, declared Thursday Bight: "H is aboul time Ihe American press fakes off (he gloves and tries (o bring sanity lo the emo- tional binge that has lliis country dangerously off balance." McKnighl, president of Iho American Society of Newspaper Kdilors and c.xeculivc editor of the Dallas Times Herald, said, "Once (here was a cry from the left that we were a 'one party press' snugly grouped together to do the bidding of conservative political wings. II started in the middle of the New Deal ami rose to crescendo heights during the Eisenhower wave. "Bui somewhere the tune changed. Few newspaper patterns have shifted, but the shout from the far right now labcl.s us as 'the leftist press that distorts the nation's image.' "II is nol true." The editor added in a speech prepared for t h e California- Nevada Associated Press Asso- ciation: "I resent to the core Ihese sud- den palriols who aimlessly and broadly charge Ihe American Press with a lack of concern (or the welfare of this country. "We are not, as too man) charge, Communist dupes because we atlempt to follow moderate lines and call for a look at inter- nal bickering." The nationally prominent news paperman related, "In very re cent years I have been subjectet to indignities, to vile Ihreats, to the venom of cowardly anony- mous telephone calls. I have been called a Communist, Worse, llicse things have happened lo my farni "Why? I happen to be the editor of a newspaper that printed botl tides of the problems thai troubl our society these days, My news paper has editorially hewn, with out exception, lo the 100 per cen American.yiewpoint; to the side o- law and oYder, whether we lik It or not." The editor gave an example o another kind of allack on news papers. "Not long ago that lale, late television comic and commercia plugger, Jack Paar, set out in a moment of personal indignation li discredit the American Press. Mi Paar, among the last lo withdrav his support of and admiration fo Fide! Castro, has misused the vast medium of his television t broadcast innuendo, half-truth and completely erroneous infor- mation concerning Hie American Press and stories it has published. "1 shall not bore you with de- tails of Parr's incredible out- hursts, but 1 do have one prime example of his inaccurate moulh- uigs. "On Dec. 19, while commenting on a profile story the Associalod Press had written about him, Mr. Paar blithely lold millions of lis- teners: 'So this guy there are some great lines in it and about me, some really funny lines that I get a big laugh out of. The best one was that I look like a Presbylerion minister after four martinis. Oh. that's funny. When in truth I don't drink before the show. I can't with my personality. Can you Imagine me with a few "Now to my point about (his mounting irresponsibility ln ltlls country. Mr. Parr did not tell Ihe truth. Nowhere in the Associated Press story was there mention of Presbyterian minister and four martinis. Great little joke for Mr Paar. "Meanwhile, the credibility and reputation of Ihe Associated Press, Ihe world's grcalosl news- galhering agency, lies wounded. And that is not good for our great est line of unbridled information and communication around Ihc world." The editor said, "I ask these slevisiou slalion were exlermi- ated or forced to print and broad- ast identical 'party line, philos- .McKnight added: "We seem to be split loosely nto two foggy camps known as bcrals anil conservatives. I won- er whatever happened lo just ilain And: "We didn't become the World's mightiest free society lirough .slander of our brothers. Man Hit by Car Is Hospitalized Ilollis Everett Swafford Sr., 43 31 Sammons, as being treatec it Ilendrick Memorial Hospital foi njuries received when lie was truck by a car at the intci'sec ion of S. 2nd and Cheslnul Sis. ai a.m. Friday. Patrolmen Joe Beck and Joe as-Jor said Swafford was walking rom north to sotilh across N, 2m it. when he was sltuck by an auto driven by William W. Gowanlock 36, of the Drake Hotel. Gowanlock told officers he haa )cen looking lo his left lo do ermine whether was clea and (hat when he looked back tc ho front his auto already hai struck (he pedestrian, Witnesses said Gowanlock wa aol traveling at a high rale o speed. Swafford was knocked Severn 'ect, officers said. N'o details on the extent of hi injuries were available. COMING FROM GRAND JURY Capt. Floyd Isbell comes from the room where the 104th District Court Grand Jury is probing into alleged improper activities at the Taylor County Sheriff's Office and hy some members of the Abilene Police Department. Capt. Isbell was one of six witnesses heard Thursday. (Staff Photo) Thurmond Asks Censor Probing WASHINGTON (AP) Sen. Strom Thurmond, D-S.C., de- manded today that the Senate in- vesligalion of Pentagon censoring of anli-Communisl speeches re- sume at the earliest, despite or- people hollow and super- iol's fmm President Kennedy diarges: 'Must what other watchdog do Hiey have? "How do they learn of Ihc do- ings of governmental agencies and that they might voice their dissenting views? "How would they know if they had been completely hoodwinked out of all rights and shoved into tyrannical subjugation? "Where do they gel Information to build Ihelr own voice of opinion A voice thai has heard. H right to be "And how long would Iho Unilcd Stales last as a free nation if every newspaper, every radio and Can Get Loans WASHINGTON (AP) Texas fnrnwri In Falls, Jones and I.ime- counties may now ask omcr- Kency loann from Iht Administration. silencing some key witnesses. Thurmond, whose allncks on the censoring of military men's speeches against communism had forced the invc.stlgalion by a spe- cial subcommittee, said in an in- ervicw he saw no danger (hat he spreading rows surrounding Ihe inquiry might lorpcdo it. Chnirmnn John Slennis, D-Miss., recessed (he hearings Ixil indi- cated they would resume, pos sibly in n week or so Kennedy Thursday forbnde de- fctisc or .state department official to tell the subcommittee which censors altered the texts of spe- cific speeches. Slennis sustained the President's elnim of cxecu live privilege as a basis for the order. In another developmcnl, n row on Ittc Sonalc floor in Ihe Pentagon over the Honing by (wo subcommittee nldcs of approximately 30 Mar V iues about Ihe cold war and communism. Slennis made public a protest Gen. David M. Shoup, Marine -orps commandant, who voiced 'mighly strong disapproval" of he investigators' tactics. -Sens. Mike Mansfield, Wayne Morse, D-Ore.; M. Young, D-Ohio, and others Red Berlin Chief Tests Gate Ban U. S. Troops Slop Auto In Berlin BKRL1N Soviet com- mandant in Berlin attempted to enter the American sector today in defiance of a United States ban. He turned back when U.S. Military Police asked him to identify himself. Tlic commandant. Col. Andrei! I. Solovycv, was oti his way to the Brilish sector to keep an ap- pointment am! could have entered [he British sector was urged lo do so by the British chose to lest the American ban. He appeared at (he Friodrich- slrasse crossing point in the U.S. sector, designated by the East Germans as the only crossing through Berlin's wall for foreigners. Had he crossed at any other point he would, have been show- ing disrespect for tlie decrees of the East German the Soviets claim is a sovereign state. Solovyev has been banned from Ihe American sector since Dec. 23. At that lime Ihe U.S. com- mandant, Maj. Gen. Albert Wal- isoii 1! turned back from an effort to enter the Soviet zone because Cast German guards insisted lor lie first lime lliat his civilian ad- visers in civilian clothes identify themselves. British spokesman said Solo vyev was coming lo British head- quarters for an appointment he requested, presumably to deliver the Soviet reply io art Allied pro- posal lo end the impasse between dim and Watson. WOUNDED MAN COMKORTKO IN PARIS several killed, wmtmlcd in rioting Reds Threaten Strikes After Violence in Paris PARIS Communists to-jdemouslration protesting the gov- tacked the security forces." day threatened strikes anri morclernment's failure to quell Ihc tcr-i The Communists, backed hy demonstrations after a wild night jiorists of the Secret Army Orsan-'other left-wing parlies and non- izaliou. (Communist trade unions, relaliat- Inlerior Minister Roger a threat lo call a general charged (hat the Communists during Ihc funerals of of Moody rioting in Paris in eight were hundreds injured. killed The Brilish spokesman said The Reds accused ihe police of voked (lie bloodshed and victims. Solovyev was lold lo come direct "unbelievable savagery" in three clarcd: "These people wanted! retain was sentenced to death lo the British sector without goingihnurs of fierce street fighting trouble. Rarely have such part in the Vichy regime through the American zone. But which erupted from a Communist organized bands rioters World War 11, but the sen- leiK'c was commuted and he died ici prison. The non-Communist Socialist splinter party led by former Pre- jniLcr Pierre Mendes-France de- ;mmidcd the resignation of Pans police Chief Maurice Papon and dismissal of Frcy. The parly Solovyev sent word back he was coming Ihrough the Fricdrich- slrasse Crossing point inlo the American sector. The Brilish provost marshal, LI. Col. L.F. Richards, went lo meet him ami told Solovyev that! Ihe U.S. ban on his entering the! American sec-tor was still inj force. Solovyev drove up to the- MP com rot hut anyway. Rome Paper Says Luciano Poisoned He made no reply whca (he MPs asked "Are you Col. Solo- Instead the car turned a rou ad a ad drove back into Ihc East sector. i The Friedrichhlrasse crossing! is Ihe oniy one designalcd by the Kail Germans for foreigners lo cross through Ihe Communist wall dividing the city. ROMK Homo paper a bar. Minutes Inter said today dojxnletl Charles (Lucky) Luciniiu lord It) Luciano's car, warlord dropped poisomtl-either by his own hand An autopsy was performed Jan. or hy an umlciAuirld executioner 2n. Afterward medical jiulhorilie.- Telesera. an afternoon a preliminary check showed! ;aid an autopsy ha  while he port uinil completion of Stihorn was at ttie Naples' airport to meet'lory tests on certain organs. I a visitor. Italian narcotics Tixlay Tolrsera ted traces lives he was then lie-in" of jwtassiuin cyanide had been shadowed by asenls in Hie viscera. The ncws-j drug ring. paper said the final autopsy re-' The 0-1-year-old underworld fig- port meant Luciano had not died. but lire met his visitor. Thou thcj sipped glasses of (mil juice at Pecos Man New Snyder of a he.irt allack. but liaci been killed or committed suicide. In Naples, Prof. Pielro Vcrga. who performed the autopsy, tho stntc prosecutor's office avoided a flat denial or confirma- tion of Ihe Telesera story. "I have made nu statement priming plants were attacked. Two Slickup Suspects Are Freed date has concerns an aulol EASTI.AN'I)  'rlh anil W-Sfl souih. lliah soiiTiiosrr ilns n liule iMlllbl IJ'-H .hrau lllih SaUirrinv. Mostly ofrr SMucUr la Ki. rlntxlv niKl S.lllllltXV. IX1W rday !.VM. Yrtr uftrm tint anri A lixillbl U-U. cil lo furcv hor into a slorage room before Ixifuui of i Kven before Luciano's entered (ho store. She aged six and two. is a member !'llc said, ibr lumlil forced Krazier lo Ilanlist church the llinl cll'nleilts 'uikcd him Ilir money from Ihe cash had born in then ran to Die waiting mcmticr.s of tlu'jfar. ring. I She said his only threat Narcotics agents searched call for ciano's hnmo in Naples the after-! Investigating arc Horn, Deputy noon before lie died, the John Wlllingham, Oorma the.................... 'JIDownlown Lions Club and Texasjwl 'city Manni.'f'rs' Association. His iinnual salary was scl at. Cily Kngiuecr Bill Kimzey has been acting cily inanagcr. Mayor John llninhlen announced the decision lo hire Pallorson was by iinaniinous council. vote of the cily ment said, and questioned him Ihc nexl morning, a few hours he- wenl lo (h shadowed by n detective. fonslalile .lug Dennis and High- way Patrolmen Klwcrd K. W. Wnlls, Tom Holland Sgt. J. 0. Tnnncr.   

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