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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, February 7, 1962 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 7, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               Abilene Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT BIST YEAR, NO. 235 ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 7, PAGES Press SPACE NETWORK Congress Urged To Charter Firm WASHINGTON Kennedy urged Congress today to charier a huge shares lo be sold lo the public and communications build and run a worldwide space network for radio, television ami telephone. More Ihnn billion in first- class voting slock in the "Com- munications Satellite Corporation" would be made available lo (he public and communications car- riers at not less Ibnn a share. Other secondary shares could be purchased only by com- panies in the communications field. The corporation would be de- signed lo make a ly a good the rental of satellite channels lo firms such as telephone anil telegraph compa- nies and lo other authorized or- ganizations, foreign and domestic. letter lo the speaker of the House and the president of the Senate. The letter accompanied proposed legislation, "the Communication! Satellite Act of that spelled out the details. There has been controversy and hearings over who should own the projected satellite communication government, a mo- nopoly by one or group ol firms, or open to all comers. Kennedy urged today that both the public and the communica- tions carriers be let in on the deal. Last July lie announced ho was in favor of private ownership. The proposal called for the is- sue of a million shares of Class voting stock. While these shares would be eligible [or dividends the payoff might be a long time coming. Government officials warned that Ihe initial costs'of a satellite The satellites, as relay stations communications system will be so In space, would open innumerable channels for international commu- nications and make possible ocean- sfxming telecasts. Kennedy set forth the plan in a CAP IVIrcpltlo) 'FIDEL CASTRO no support UN Oratory Seen Over Cuban Charge UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (AP) great that earnings in Ihe first years will small. Estimates of he costs of such a system range upward from million and it is unlikely to become a profitable venture in less than a decade. Just when the space network will be a reality is a matter of dispute. The director of Ihe President's Space Council, Dr. E. C. Welsh, has said it will be some years be- fore the system is ready to be launched. Some private compa- nies had testified they could do the job by I9C3. Welsh said, how- iver, these companies have changed their lune and now arc speaking of ISCS. As forerunners of the program. Ihe United Slates planned to put 5 6 Miners Killed In German Blast CHARLES MAPKS .IK. BUSSES 15OBO dale not yet set Bobo Rockefeller To Wed Hotelman Senators Seek Names Of Censors WASHINGTON (API-Senators investigating censorship of mili- tary officers' speeches sought to- day to crack through Pentagon refusal lo reveal who had cen- sored specific speech texts. _ Sen. John Slennis, D-Miss., f called his special investigating 9 subcommittee lo a closed-door- {meeting for another slab at de- ciding on a next step in the sim- mering row. Sen.' Strom Thurmond. D-S.C., whose denunciations of Ihe cen- soring precipitated the inquiry, called it time for a showdown wilh Secretary of Defense Robcrl S. McXamara. Sen. E.L. Baiilctl, U-Alaska, suggested Ihe censors should he allowed lo tell the story for their own protec- tion, declaring any other .solution NEW YORK Bobo was horn Jievule Barbara IBobo) Rockefeller re-jiole, the daughter of an iimni- vcaled today hotelman Pennsylvania coal miner W. Mapes Jr. had taken a '..ilbuania. She was married engagement ring from a safe tle-jlo Richard Sears of Boston In'fore had no intention of budging from posit and put it on her finger..she married Rockefeller at Palm his own refusal to reveal who ccn subject (hem to unjustified Paulck-itl'itidsm- Mc.N'am.ira went before Ihe sub- committee Tuesday and declared salcllites in orbit this year. If Kennedy's proposal should approved, the government would handle Ihe corporation's salellilc The corporation would pay for the space vehicles and other exjwnses involved. Kennedy said it must be real- ized Ihal Ihc salellile syslcm will be a government-created monopo- lhat we cannot in good conscience limit its ownership to a few existing companies ami ex- clude automatically all other po Icnlial investors who have rights lo own a part of Ibis feder- ally developed enterprise." Sen. Robert S. Kcrr, D-Okln., has introduced a measure which would limit participation (o corn- I "We taught the ring and put it Beach. Tla.. in 1918. "-Pi "veil loader only a few year we Bobo said at Ihe.monlhs when separation came. El Morocco where the couple ccl-lller grounds for divorce w-erc cbraled in the predawn hours. iinore than four years' separation. iiobo said she was measured sored what speeches, or of wilh-j' drawing his orders forbidding censors (o do so. Ihe ring's setting a few days-ago. Bobo, 45-year-old daughter of a coal won a di- vorce settlement from Vvinlhrop Rockefeller in Ifl54. She empha- sized that no date had been scl for her marriage [o Mapes. -n. Warmer, Windy Weather Siaied Windy and warmer SHOl'IMNG SI'RKK Actress Taylor and husband, singer Eddie Kisher leave a Paris'hold to attend a fashion show. Liz, away front the "Cleo- patra" sel in Rome, is reported to have spent about during a three-hour shopping lour this week. (AP Wircpholo) 150 Missing; Coal Dust Gas Blamed SAARBKUKCKKK. Germany (API A fiery explosion caved in laise areas of the I.niscnlhal coal mine near here soday and officials reported sr, mineis were killed, Til injured and ISO to 2'20 were j missing. The Coal .Mine Office of the Stale of Sarrland announced 216 miners in the workings at the lime of Ihe blast were rescued or reached safety. Many of those saved suffered severe injuries. The explosion occurred about 9 a.m. at a depth of 1.300 feet in the so-called Alsbach layer of the mine. The Mining Office blamed the Wast on coal dust gas. The mine is at nearby Voel- klinpen. Fire and Ihe cave-in of several levels of the mine killed some 'workers. Others died when a shock wave threw them against pit walls. "f was back against the walls of Ihe pit by a huge air DISEASE son of a Nevada callle baron Thursday will do awayjtn'nc owner of a hotel in Ueno. iwilh the remnants of the dry cold thcin llc cont She added a laughing quip: which bit hero overniglil Sun- Slennis told Cuba's charge in the companies. Nations that the United Stales is planning new aggression againsl Prime Minister Fidel Castro's re- gime appears fatal to wind up as Jin oratory exercise with the Ocn- tral Assembly laking no action whatever. The United Slates had made plaih thai it will oppose reso- lution related lo the Cuban charges no matter how mild OK vaguely worded. The U.S. stand is expect- ed lo get support from virtually all Ihe Latin American and West Kuropcan members and a good portion of the 50-mcmbcr Asian- African group. The General Assembly's main political committee, which re- cessed for a day so ihal mem- bers could wade through the mass of charges and counter charges delivered at the opening session Monday, scheduled two debate cessions today. Chairman Mario Amadeo of Ar jenlina was reported having trou- ble gelling anyone to lake part in the Cuban debate. Only Com- munist Romania and Guatemala were scheduled to speak. Cuba and its .Soviet bloc back- ers have been trying lo frame a resolution that would command Ihe two-thirds majority needed for approval in the lO-l-nation assem- bly, hut they apparently have re- ceived lillle encouragement. Several measures introduced in the House provide, on Ihe oilier hand, for complete government ownership. Kennedy included a number of provisions designed to guard againsl domination by any one stockholder. Kennedy said he planned to es- tablish, and rely heavily upon, a director of telecommunications management in the Office of Emergency Planning, and also look lo the National Aeronautics and Space Council for hcip in the program. He said enactment of the pro- posed legislation and the opera tion ef a satellite communications system would provide a dramatic demonstration of leadership in space and inlcnl lo share space benefits for peaceful use. NEWS INDEX SECTION A Busmen Outlook S To Your Good Health 5 Rodio-TV loji 9 TV Report.........9 SECTION B Bridge 3 Womcn'l Amusements 6 Comici 7 B 1 Obituaries 11 McXsmata has declared re peatedly he was not Irvine lo hide! anything and had nothing lo hide. But, he argued, in censoring speech lexts his men had merely obeyed orders and policy direc- tives for which lie would lake responsibility. To subject them to II quizzing alxnit it would imcler- morale and be unfair to tended. iope the engagement doesn't lastjdny, droppiim the mercury from a committee could not let wm-ldwidc fight against IKIV- handed him an mir.ilel intended as long as Ihe thinking period." high Of H2 Sunday afternoon to a'rcMISC lo answer questions on clty ignorance and disc; The couple's party was (he belwecn fi ami lo leave the night club. Tbev de- Tne-cb a m. bv isuch grounds. He noted that Me-: has declared he i m pressure wave." said a young mitxn1 who escaped. "A huge 100-yard long sheet of flame shol from Ihe second level to the fourth down the main he said. "When it hit the fourth level, there was a gigantic explosion. Most of the men on Ihe fourth level were young kids, learning the mining trade." Many were (rapped by falling debris and hundreds of rescue workers including elements of (he U.S. Army in struggled lo reach them. explosion occurred. Many fled in panic, bul returned later to help .with rescue operations. Al the muddy, rain-soaked ap- "As young people, we can do I There w-erc only brief demon- proaeh lo ihe mine about persons, including many young Kennedy Asks Youth to Fight OSAKA. Japan Ally..workers galliered to wave. AI one Gen Roberl F. Kennedy ehal-'puinl he leaned out to .shako hands .1 newsmen the sub-, leniied Japan's youth today lo join campaign style, and a student t-i safemiard tr.ivcle !battle together as brolhers lo.sfralions by Communists. At .1 w o Jb il C. K. reluctant to chum executive kc CTca, hr.lel a.s (he Kennedv lained Hobo's Ueno divorce from Bui'ciul r T TT al Petroleum insti- drove up in a Ims. about lameci tiouos neno nivoue nomjsnid Hie forecast is for consider- the legislative branch lesl the: sdJod with anxious faces. Rescue workers descended inlo IK- nenr standing the couple would be ried in a couple of days and would live in Reno. Matrimonial rumors about Bobo and Mapes began flying shortly afler the divorce, in which she also gained custody of her son by Rockefeller. Barbara wasn't talking alwui it at thai time, but Mapes had this ernifihl low .s likely lo be around 45. The mcrciiiy reached 50 Tuesday, dipping (0 .19 Wednesday Thurmond morning. sustain his claim if he makes it. and 1 am not sure he could." WfATHER I demanding .tempt of Congress prosecutions loi jforce a court decision on the! fertS lissuc. The Supreme Court never [lias defined the right of executive [officers lo plead oxeculive privr :iege. Stock Market Active, Mixed YORK market was mixed in aclive trad- ing at the opening today. Changes of most key stocks were narrow. (lencral Motors opened on 5, shares, up al rr.vrn.M. tlirirjv'fi "I'lir.i ami TKX lo tx? loss significant than he had hoped. Stcunis said he believed his staff has obtained little if any- thing from the censors that they now are forbidden lo tell. The Veterans of Foreign Wars! m in." wjn, subcommittee a slalemcnl charging tlial (he cen-' innio'hi ami Ttiln-iiAv' soring of speeches by members Ihn Joint Chiefs of Staff the status of the M'v'lmilitary as a whole." 'Amern.'a nud I Kennedy list pnrlv ofidead or injured miner. back Oki-i Ambulances, fire brigades and ignored them'rescue crews from ihe entire coal- -'als'i. :ricli Saar Basin raced to the area. que.stionrd the students Screaming sirens alerted the en- at the petroleum closely I tire region and families of men I abuul Iheir studies and told them: I employed al the mine began clus- "Vou have Ilie rcsiMinsibilMy to] lei ing at Ihe entrance to the mine, jbelp in the fiiiil Ihal has lo he! A rescue crew from Ihe U.S. fougH by ail ynung people1 Army in Kai.serhui'.en was senl to {throughout the uorld against jxiv-ilhe area (o assist, jerly, isnorar.ee ami disease." j Direction of rescue operations Several students asked what I was taken over hy (he Saarland young feel alKHit Ihciminis'.cr of labor. Paul Simonts. future. JHelii'opleis assisted in taking the "They fi'el ih.it gic.il to hospitals rare facing us." Kennedy replied.! The mine has won several prizes they also feel future has.fur safely. jgrenl (ieimany's flisa.i- I "We. ;is young ix-nplc. was in IMfi in the Ruhr wbcn great aecoinpiishir.eiils men lost iheir lives. jbe made" j The mosl disnsirous mining ac- Kennedy, who flew wiih his wife'cident in the Saar. ,1 rich c( al 'to Osaka from Tokyo this morn-land steel h.iMn. was in 1907 when also loured an electrical plant 148 miners lost their lives at the- I.SP Wlrrp STAV HKII.MAN hr's sefn 'pin all thai turns out Ufl.OOO TV sets a Rede: mine Saaibruccken. 'month He company In Hie 1950-tiO decade at least (eials atxiut the workers' wasesj2ii7 miners died in accidents in working cdiidilions. K .inil KaM Germany. Gate-Crashing Cabbie No Stranger to Royalty By ROBKRT NKW YOHK (AP) Stan Her- man nolified his employer Ihal he will be iinnblo lo report for duty Thursday. Slan is going lo Washington lo Attend a motion picture world premiere with some of President Kennedy's Cabinet members and their wives and friends. He hasn't really been invited lo the lop-lcvel mere for- mality lhat never seoms lo slnnd in his way of n good lime. Stan is a 35-year-old Brooklyn bachelor who imslics a cab around Manhattan when he isn't busy flitting around the country crash- ing parlies, baseball games, prize fighls, dlplomnlic receptions and events, "I'm Ihe world's Rrcalosl gale trashcr I have police, FBI, Scci'el Service and even Scotland Yard records to prove it." he claims. year the cabhie managed lo end up in Ihe presidential box al Ihe inaugural ball sandwiched between Kennedy's father and Ally. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy's wife. The President sat only a few seals away. "I put on my full dress suit, acted as though I a momlwr of (he official gang and before the Secret Service knew what wns doing, 1 was plunked down on a scat rlghl In ihe middle of Ken- nedy's he recalled. The presidential gendarmes soon cmighl on, however, and Ihe impostor was ejected and then questioned thoroughly. Stan hosan RdtR-crnshlnR nl of M when, In pursuit of lographs, he found himself surak- inc, inlo all sorts of functions lo gel first crack al Ihe celebrities. Soon (he autograph seeking be- came secondary lo the challcime of gate-cra.shing and Slan was off on an avocation lhat has taken him across the country several limes. Why? "I gel a charge oul of rubbing ellsow.s with socicly folks and big wheels and millionaires just to prove lo myself lhat a humble, liltle eabhie can hobnob wilh llie Slan explained. "Sonic people save coins or stamps. Some build things in Iheir cellars. Some drink for a hobby. Me, I gel my kicks crashing gales." he said. "I havo a cultur- al .side that lakes mo lo high siwi- tvingdinKx am! slnff like lli.il." Aside from aiilo- praphs of lanimis people. Slan has dozens of pictures to hack up his claims. They show him "nibbinp el- bows" wilh Kovernnis, movie slnrs. society leaders and even a presidenl or tun. Several years ago he barged in nu a U'aldorf-Asloria Hotel ball given in honor of Hrilain's Queen "This was my greatest Stan admits. "I pul on a full dress suit, walked around Ihe ball- room like I nas a head ivniler and then walked up lo Ihe fiuecn when I got Ihe chance. "I shoved a piece of paper lo her and asked for her he recalled, "and she look it, said 'iigli' and banded it to Gov. llarrim.in who was standing r.ost to her." Seconds later Stan was being ushered inlo a side room for an- other round ol lime by Scotland Yard men. Me was cleared and ordered from the hotel. Slan was on hand al a San 7'Yanciscu airport in Iftfl uhcti (Ion. Douglas MacArlhur returned from Japan. A holograph shows him reaching over the of official grcelors and slipping a piece of paper into Ihe grnnal's tunic pockcl. "On the paper I wrote 'Mac- Arthur for Slan gig- gled. A few years ago he went In Augusta. Oa., In join President Eisenhower In round of nolf. managed In eel a few fed fmni the I'rrsidi'iit and shoul a gtvcl- Ihe foursome leeri off wilh. oul him. lie uenl In Yankee Slailiurii of- ten In crash shirts events and once jumped in the ring while of- ficials adding up lo determine who won .1 between Carmen Hasiliii and Hay Kr.hinsitii "I hrld up a sign snyuiR linbin- son atul bcfuro 1 was IONM'I! from the ring, the referee an- umini'cd Ibe Slan "It was In order lo accomplish his feuls of interloping. Sl.ui spends cnnsid- crahle money on formal am! other necessary rlolhiiiK. Irnvel expens- es and loses aboul ?M) o! his nor- l m.il a iiionlh salnry ol lime off the job. .lusl month, Sinn crashed his way iiuti) the official platform slood a few inches away from Kichaid Unities Mini w.is rcdling Ihe oath thai made him liovcrniir of Jersey. Hut Slan says Ihe must annis- ini; ci'ash of iiis caieer c'air.t1 re- cently when ho elbowed hi way into the church for actress l.ucillo Hall's wedding in New York. "I palmed myself [iff as a full- dress Ixnlyguard lo uct inlo (lie rhutch." he explained. "Then I saw Miss Hall in Ihe back, and 1 walked over and lolci her I was an usher. "She leaned over and said, Tla sure you check that guesl list close. I don't want any in here.'   

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