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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 5, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 5, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 81ST YEAR, NO. 233 ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5, 1962 IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press French, Algerian Tensions Increase VRKS1DENT DE GAULLE reports tonight Kennedy Eyes Commercial Space Work WASHINGTON (API Presi PARIS (API with security forces, France and Alge- ria waited .tensely for President Charles dc Oaulle's report tonight over radio and television on his progress toward ending the seven- year rebellion in (he North African territory, Thousands of riot police, 32 tankc.-.inn squad cars and light armored- vehicles waited on (he iuuu un the outskirts of Paris. Troops look strategic positions in key Algerian cities to counter (lie threat of an uprising by (he under- ground Secret Army Organization of Europeans fighting to keep Al- geria French. For days high sources have leaked the word that secret nego- tiations between De Gaulle and Ihe Algerian rebels toward a cease-fire are well advanced. Few observers, however, believed that the time had arrived when the French president, who has dedi- cated himself lo setlling the rebel lion, could announce a peace set- tlement. DC Gaulle is a leader who keeps his own counsel. But there was growing speculation (hat he wouk express guarded optimism about the prospects for an Algerian set- tlement, He also is expected lo denounce the rightist Secret Army and make another rallying call for support by declaring his Fifth Republic. dent Kennedy is expected lo telljwhich grew out of lhe Algerian Congress today he would like tojcrisis, has brought the country -i toirijslabiiity and prosperity, see several commercial firms take. of part in development of a woiUi-.itc lacljcs js to ratn0 wide communicaUons satellite sys-.-ry transmitters during important tern. Tim President was prepared to register his opposition to domina- tion of the proposed system by any one company, informed sources said. Kennedy's special message on communications satellites was ex- pected to clarify Ihe government s position on ownership arid partici- pation in the proposed system. In his Slate ot the Union mcs- sage-Kennedy said he would "soon send to the Congress a measure to govern the financing and opera- tion ot an international communi- cations satellite system in a man- ner consistent with the public in- terest and our foreign policy." Kennedy had proposed last year that Ihe United States launch such a system and make its facilities HVfii'loWc to (he world. He also sug- gested that private enterprise own Ihe U S. share and that other coun- tries he invited to invest in the system. Sen Robert S. Kcrr. chairman of the Senate Space Committee, troduccd a bill lasl month inp establishment of a SMO million- cornoratlon lo push development of glob.il space communications. Kerr, an Oklahoma Democrat sard the corporation would own the U S part of the system with 5.000 shnres for sale at SHU.OOO each. Aides to Kerr said the proposa ad lovenunenl broadcasts, then rui n Secret Army broadcasts on (he same wavelength. To counter this lactic a heavy guard was posted at the base of Communist groups delivered he Kiffel Tower, which has an im- portant TV relay installation atop t. Guards were doubled around and television installations in Algeria. An eslimated 100 European dic- linrds were arrested in (he Alge- rian capital in an effort to stall off some of the trouble. Leaders ot the Algerian rebel government were meeting in Tunis 10 sludy reports of its emissaries who hare been holding secret ses- 13 sionanes Leave Mission AGGRESSION CHARGED Cuba Seeks UN Anti-U.S. Move UNITED NATIONS. MY. Terences by peaceful means, pushed today for anti-jl'u'ough negotiations, without rc- action from lhe to llse of force." United Nations to overshadow the! v-s-  cen evacuated from the Presby- .erian mission at Bibanga in south Kasai. scene of new mill, lacy lensions caused by insubordi- nate Congolese troops, consular officials announced today. The. missionaries were flown out last week after a U.N. rescue, plane was seized and its crew held for three hours by Ualuba Iribal gendarmes loyal lo Iheir native chief, Albert Kclonji, now under arrest by the central government. Husbands of Ihrr-e of the women remained at the mission. The United Nations said a letter insisting on freedom of movement in the Uoubled area had been sent to the Kasai provin- cial authorities and had been favorably received, but it was not clear how much effective control lhe provincial government would as a candidate for congressman.; The Kasai, which lamiiii mean that Japan will ie frozen out vakia of Ihe lucrative American market. [called tests today for U.S. Ally. Gen. Itobert Kennedy, The Japanese Reds, told Ken- nedy's schedule was tight, oblig- ingly delivered their written protesis against of ;ls wc" as itself in the EEC. American Communists" is 3; Kennedy, an expert and tireless minor official of the U.S. whirled about Tokyo Sv. tail morning on behalf of his and Romania introduced, on the Cuban and U.S. filed lor re-election and fu-j Cnmully said he was to be lure of a number of I   ri ii nnfh. Ulffh Turtrtny 40 In north Kennedy Will Host Adoula At Luncheon up in (he first official call I a cripplcd childn I..S. attorney general's camp, up in (he of the day visit to .Japan. Osborn said the proposed. S'.i-cenl a posuxl siirchniye on tliel cotton content of textiles the! .Ircn's homo. NEWS INDEX United Stales imports was stressed spo in Kennedy's talk with Ikcda. To SECTION A Obituaries ,orrs Your Good Health Kennedy assured Ikeda thai lhe; Bridge trend in U.S. policy is definitely) t SECTION B toward lowering tariffs, Osborn! j Arnusomcnls Kennedy also (old Ikcda that; President Kennedy's intention toi Editorials 2 .12 ...12 3 6 6 6 since ISM when K was recorded. The cold front is not expected to bring any moisture and winds are expected to decrease Monday night, Silchler said. The forecast is for fair weather through Tuesday with Monday to be much colder with continued cold Tuesday. Monday's expected high is lo he in the low 40's willi Tuesday's high expected around monl concerning his plans. jMuve had an could not be contacted working with so'me of the ;finest people I have ever known In a weekend of lasl-mimilc tol, mvanli velopmeuls. Mrs. .loo L. .lamvs "fipcrsonal exiwrience 720 Hawthorne St. announced Clara Stuart, Griffin. Ga.. with four children, Mary 14, Martha 13. John 10. and Frances 8 A Miss O'liear. Olivia Lamotle, 28, of North Sundav niRlit Hint siie would be' tr wlrh wavr. Inntrhl. Ttmdn- "nH Pflfff. Imikichl M to Hllh In sCHTTitWEST TT.XAS: CnW wavf In pArKv clnodv mid trnilthl wllh cnt-1 WKvt InnkM. TMHliy flttt IM mv1 Ic M. W WASHINGTON (AD-President Kennedy welcomes Premier Cy- lillc Adoula of Ihe Congo to Wash- ington today with a luncheon at the While House. Adoula is assured of a friendly reception on his unofficial visit. His success in prevailing over ex- hcmisls of the left and right in lhc Congo has surpassed the high- est U.S. hones. is not likely the 38-year-ohl moderate Congolese leader will promised any new U.S. aid while visiting here. However, inform- ants said, plans arc afoot to ex- tend further economic assistance lo his country through the United Nations. Undersecretary of State Clcorgc Call and G. Mennen Williams, (he assislanl secretary for African af- fairs, planned to be at Washing- Ion National Airport for Ihe ar- rival from New York of Adoula, his wife and advisers. A Iwo-hnur stag luncheon nt the White House and n one-hour con- ference wilh Kennedy follow. In the afternoon, Son. Albert Gore, n-Tcnn., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations snbcomniillec on Africa, is host at n lea in Ailoula'.s honor. In lhc evening Williams entertains lhc Adoulas nt his residence. Adoula will visit Tuosdny morn- ing with Eugene Black, president of the World Bank. Sundav's overnight low was 37.i "Our is composed, for with (wo children, a candidate for State l'art- of amatcnrs.j.S.irjih 3 and John 2. live Place 2. in the Democratic'wllosc interest in conserva-! J'rs- John K. Miller and two primary in Jiiay. n'ovcrnnicm has caiifcd ihemiCiiiWren. Dr. Mi.'ler piloted the She said she would file for become involved in politics, Bc-jmission airplane, office later Monday and make of fact lhat we are aina- formal announcement within the have had a lot to learn, nexi few days. much of it the hard way, about; She wil! be opposing Don Xor-jbow lo ,-iccojnpli.sb the ris and A. C. Kyle the Deino-juc are si riving for rcsponsi-- cralic ticket. Ed Templelon has j bit1 conservative govcnimem. lo-i on lhe Republican ticket. K'aliy. statewide and in Waslung- J. Ed Connally, chairman of the ilon, D C. "We feel that the record of Indonesians Rip Down growth of the Republican Party II f ft in Taylor County is something that) I all of the hundreds of who U> Ji I IOU have had an active part in il can lake considerable pride. Il is my JAKARTA. Indonesia l'hope llial the liep'.iblicans of student mob stoned lhc U.S. !nr County will allow me lo and ripped down the linuc !o serve them for another'American flag tmiay. injurirg or.e lerrn as county chairman." jemploye. The action brought a M. A. 'Mike' St. George of Abi-jvigorous American prtitc.st. ne also has Cmnily GOI'j Tre believed lo be chairman. Iprn-ConiiiHinisl. were prnleslinR Rndges. who has lived in a riutch plane carrying lene since 1KH, is chief u, ;Scw for General Western wns to rofllcl Corn, lie served as precinct chairman prior to his elcclion as county chairman, and is active in oil industry affairs. Bridges and his wife, fie The inch action came before rc- ports reached here that Iho t.j iL'nitcii Stales had withdrawn per- (I.... ami children. Sandra.jmission for 'llanes Doug. Pan, and Bruce, live at B02 USe ll.exiuglon St. fldlis '1l Anchorase. Alaska; lion- KORBIGN INTRIGUK Congolese Premier Oyrlllo Adoula scorns fascinated by lhe'snow in Now York. He arrived from his equatorial homeland late last week lo find the cily in a February snowfall. (AP Wirephoto) Stock Market Opens Higher NKW YORK and Island. At the Hague, a comnuminue Premier Jan Quay of lhe had expressed his deep disappointment and added th.it ho could not understand live I' S. decision. U.S. Ambassador Howard P. was up 'i, Ohrys- Jones protested the mnb nttark lo lhe Indonesian foreign Minis- The market opened slightly liishor to- and U. S. Sleel up Motors was unchanKcd. lor lip tieiieral Standard Oil (New Jersey) picked up Kraclinnal gains wore made Texaco, fhifoiil. Hadio Corp., New York Ceulral and Sears, try. One cinliassy official. Miss Mary Mnnche.sler, a personnel of- ficer, injured. .Several others in Hie embassy ucro liil by Hying glass.   

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