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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 23, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 23, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               Abilene WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 81ST YEAR, NO. 220 ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 23, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Senate Passes Tourist Ad AUSTIN (AP) The Senate passed a tourist advertis-i ing bill today, Ihe third major hill of the special session of the legis- lature to get action from the sena- tors. The measure by Sen. Bruce Reagan of Corpus Christ! was ap- proved 22-16 after a flurry of at- tempted amendments failed. The bill now goes to the House. In the House, representatives beat down efforts to bring up a bill which would allow farmers us- ing natural gas for irrigation pumps to have rate complaints to the Railroad Commission. Reagan successfully opposed for the second time attempted amend, ments to raise the tourist adver- tising appropriation to Hurricane Carla. Money to rebuild the laboratory comes from commission funds and not the general revenue fund. Boh Baker of Houston in his attempts to up an Sen. failed appropriation to repair the San Jacinto Monument from to the original figure of The Terrorists Hil Algiers Restrictions ALGIERS re- plied with gunfire and explosives today to plans of French author- ities io clamp tight traffic and other restrictions on three of Al- geria's largest cities. Jean Morin, chief government representative in Algeria, ordered the special control measures for monument repair is n part of the! Algiers, Oran and Bone Monday tourist advertising bill. I night in an effort to stop the war Amendments by Sens. Nevcillc'between European and Moslem Colson and A. M. Aikin Jr. to raise salaries of State Depart- ment heads to passed by 22-5 votes. The amendments, at- tached to the tourist advertising bill, raised the directors' assist- ants to a year. The five department directors gunfire left two a Moslem dead terrorists. But terrorist ICurupcans and and nine .Moslems wounded in Al- giers today. Authorities said the terrorist attacks showed the necessity ol immediate application of the new that would get the raise include security measures the Department of Corrections, roadblocks, traffic stale highway engineer, Depart-j troop cordons. ment of Public Safety, Central------------------ Education Agency, Health Depart-! menl and Department of Public' Welfare. Rep. II. G. of Tulia, spon- sor of a House natural gas bill, said he would substitute an iden- tical bill already passed the Sen- ate. Wells needed 100 votes to sus- pend the rule for immediate de- bate but only received 83. The bill was opposed by Rep. including cwfews and FIRE ROARS Eight alarms sent Philadelphia fire- men hurrying to this factory building fire early to- day, only a short distance from the Betsy Ross House, (he Old Friends Meeting House and Christ Church. Four firemen wore injured but the fire did not spread. (AP Wirepholo) (IP) Most of Texas Under Ice Cover Ike, Burke Wont Military Encouraged to Speak Out WASHINGTON (AP) Former President Dwight Eisenhower ,ialul Ar'c'gn A- ex- Will Erhle of Uuldress. Ernie thc viow. mjli. the bill is a fight between a group lary mcn sllouUI clKouriigod (0 ol farmers and a gas company. "There is no necessity for regu- lation of companies in rural Erhle said. He said litiga- tion is pending in the controversy.! Welis said the bill attempts to clarify whether a gas company which was a utility before it start- sneak out against the dangers of bill communism. "Telling the stark truth about "Icommunism is Ihc best way lo make our own citizenry and other people appreciate lhe blessings of Eisenhower said in a statement sent to a Senate inves- ed KUuig gas to farmers will cornmiUee. AvpmrJ Irnm ,'ntnc cut In.- llm Ann Burke, retired former chief of naval operations, declared from lhe witness chair that tnili- men have bolh a righl and a duly lo help inform Iheir troops for tourist advertising rcpa _lhe: pllblic aboul thc mcnace Ihe San Jaeinlo monument nnd: furnish additional parole officers for the Texas Youth Council. As amended, Ihe measure pro- Commiltee, was opening what is vides for Ihe Highwayjexpccled to be a prolonged and Department to advertise tourist [possibly controversial study of re- facilities in Texas, for the slrainls on public expressions by monument and for lhe Game and Fish Commission lo rebuild a laboratory destroyed by exempt from rates set by Ihe Railroad Commission. Reagan pushed (he tourist Monday. The measure is a slimmed down j version of a previous bill to payj The Senate group, a subcommil- lee of Ihc Senate Armed Services Freeze May Lower Valley Again By THE ASSOCIATED PRKSS Texas' widespread ice storm moved deep into South Texas Tuesday, carrying with it a threat of freezing weather for the Lower Rio Grande Valley. Freezing drizzle was reported as far south as Corpus Chrisli during the morning. Most of the area to the north remained frosted over with treach- erous ice that closed hundreds of schools in North, Central and East Texas and slowed highway travel. Numerous traffic accidents oc- curred. At least 11 traffic deaths have been blamed on the arctic blast since its sweep into the Texas Panhandle Sunday. Austin streets glazed over dur- ing Ihe morning as freezing mistl fell in 25-degrce weather. Early morning traffic was! snarled in usually warm San An. tonio as freezing rain ice-coated the city's expressway system. Brownsville had a low morning temperature of 44 degrees, but the Weather Bureau said much colder weather was in store for the Lower Rio Grande Valley'. his statement that he has come to question the practice, in his ad-JTuesday. Temperatures of K ministration as in the current degrees were forecast. of the Pentagon's reviewing speeches as to content as well as security matters. "I say, let the military speak, always under properly established policies and lhe pet- supervision of their civilian Eisenhower said. He said the military must al- ways be subordinate to civil au- thority but that military leaders should help inform the public and their troops "in respecl lo the tactics, stralegy and concepts of communism. Sen. John chairman of read Eisenhower's statement the opening of the hearing. Stennis, D-Miss., the subcommittee. at military officers. Thc ino'.iiry developed from re- peated charges by Sen. Strom ADM. ARI.E1GH BURKK leadoff witness Thurmond, D-S.C., that lhe Penta- gon was "muzzling" anti-Commu- nists statements by officers. R-Maine. requested that former President Harry S. Truman be asked to submit a statement lo be placed in lhe record following military Eisenhower's. Mrs. Smith said her recollec- Kisenhower lhe senators in Ministers Split Into Three Blocs Due to Cuba's Stand Uruguay the member nations will gel to-llook of a deadlock, with several gether toward a common front-jbig nations still apparently hold- PUNTA DKL ESTE. Inler-Amcrican For- eign Ministers Conference on Cuban Communism split inlOjthc United States. three blocs loday in wrangling over how best to deal with Prime! hemispheric unity. Woodward indicated no precise out such as Ihe imposition of diplo- matic and economic penalties ad- which could meet with the ap- proval of all the participants, bill Argentina, one of the looked for developments r-an Husk. ion was (hat Truman, while he ivas president, had issued a di- rective requiring all statements and speeches of military officers be cleared not only by Ihe De- fense Dcpartmenl but also by the State Department. Burke came to the witness chair ivith a lengthy prepared stale- menl consisting in part of replies to written questions submitted to him in advance. One question was as lo his con- cept of Ihe function of military personnel in "alerting the public to Ihe military nnd political men- ace posed by our potential enemy and what restriction should be The Valley is still counting its: loss from a record breaking j freeze of two weeks ago. While colder weather was ex- pected in South Texas, conditions improved somewhat to the north. Skies remained cloudy, but the freezing drizzle and sleet had lei The Weather Bureau said an- other cold night was in store for the northern half of the slate, but, temperatures would climb above! the freezing mark by Wednesday j afternoon. Tuesday night's forecast called for readings of 16 to 24 degrees in Northwest Texas; 15 to 24 de- grees in North Central Texas: 14 to 2-t degrees in Northeast Texas: 25 to 32 degrees in South Central j Texas: 20 to 28 degrees in South- east Texas: and generally in the I 20s in Southwest Texas. I Thc Texas Highway Department! said travel was hazardous east a line from Sanderson, in far West Texas, through Rankin, Stcr- ing City, Abilene aii' lo Gainesville and north of a from Del Rio through Uvnldc Corpus Christi. THIS IS CALIFORNIA? Mrs. June Scott uses a broom to clear snow from some of the desert tropical plants in the yard of her Tujunga, Calif., home Monday after a light snowfall. See story on Pg. 2-A. (AI' Wircphoto} Winters Hampshire Barrow Best Failure of (he conference to on thcir 'r'ctivilie5 in "lis and most powerful nations, warned other members that the Wednesday night. against the Castro regime might ificlrt." ibave an adverse effect in the U S i lnsl( of lllc mili" Other U.S. sources felt on President he tlus' "1S lo Organization of American ,m[ for the combat effectiveness ol faces a dauKer of d.smtCBralion optimism that some sort of con- unless compromise formula found. A U.S. spokesman still S20-hillion project aimed lo will be voted by a'l-alin America's dangerous ceo- majority if not the desired two- ills. pressed hope the meeting would result in some indictment of Ihe Caslro regime, but lhe situation remained exlrcmely fluid. Brazil, leader of Iho anli- punishmcnl bloc, obviously has not. budged an inch after two days of Iwhiml-the-scenes bar- gaining over whether to punish Caslro wilh diplomatic or eco- nomic penalties or adopt a soft approach. "There is litllc prospecl nf com- plete accord at this a Brazilian spokesman said. Brazil, lhe largest can nation, pushed for a second postponement of lhe thirds majority of the Organiza- tion of American Slates. Kennedy's team, facing an ar- ray of conflicting (ears and aspi Thc conference had taken on Ihe rations, apparently abandoned any liope of unanimity of lhe 20 nations on strong collective pun islunenl of the Cuban regime and sought to salvage a majority con- lhe aimed forces, not to insure lhat (he entire citizenry is alerted to the potential menace of our enemy." j Kisenhower, while calling for WEATHER S. IIKIMKTMKNT OK CdM.MKKCE HK.ITMKR Ml'ltr.M- (Wruthfr inui, fntt ?-O AHII.KNt AND VICINITY IHxIlut nUrsJ Cloudy lo parlls; okxirty ilovi'ly rinnii lay noar no. Ixiw 'rutAtlav In Ih .n Ihe hlirh -TU-ji or low M1IITII TKX.VS rtrnnlv in snuih. parllv demnnlion, mighl I'srily __ In northwrst. link warmer llM. not Wrim- ipetchcs which could freeze tlie of the 20 inler-American nations considering the case of Cuba, the 21sl. Brazil wants an other day to trade views and pro posals privately. The first plenary speech-ma king tfSfVM was scheduled tonight. Robert K. Woodward, assistant c4 state for inlcr-Amcri-., can affairs, said in an interview thc United is hopeful TK.VW %nii InnluM Ifi lo U Hieh WrdnrvUv 3-i to 42. 3-00 4.IW m.m, 10 50 [umHitv Hi MK iLih and tow the stark said the facls on commiinism. "Communist menace' bill (o reopen thc question of 1m-; Thc hin fn. pact's validity got a "blood trans-.vorahlv fusion" Tuesday when Amarillo's Sen. Grady Hazelwood stopped the bill from committee consider- toothless though it The deadlock involved sharp tiif- forcnccs nf approach big nations advo- caling a soft policy toward Cuba and smaller ones feeling Castro pressure acutely and anxious for quick, positive action. The impasse plunged the foreign ministers of Ihc Organization of American Slales into complex quarrels that clearly threatened hemispheric unity. However, hopes were expressed that the hrond rtif- ferences of opinion would he filossen over by some compromise formula. As others wrangled, the Cubans remained In the background, more and more confident Ihey would emcrze from meeting unpunished. Icnultl be exploiied for political or iothcr "Kxlrcmism always he added. "Whal we need is hard fact, calmly presented and  s indication of anyone Police Department reported "secondf day. local weathermen said wonthor caused traffic acci- Rcserve chanipion was shown! in wcrejjents .Monday with only one nu- clear ancl rii-y with the exceplion'nor injury. Sec FAT, re. 5-A, Col. 1 of some in Nolan The forecast for Tuesday night the Abilene District office of Wednesday calls for cloudy Slate Highway Depl. reported. :10 p-irijy skies stow. A Continental Airlines rising temperatures. Anti-Impact Bill 'Saved' From Panel man reported operations ai Ab-. j ilene Municipal Airport had turned lo normal Fucsday Abilenc with runways dry, .skies.of inch of Reporter-News Austin Burfau jwoocl AUSTIN Sen. David Bailiffs-lion. elccl.s lo call up his tno- clearing and flights on schedule. Both Greyhound and Continen- tal bus lines reported on tune .schedules. The dispatcher for meteorologist at r Bureau sta- mra.-iircd .20 snow with a mois- Cire> hound hy the Committee or.'roarf conditions Cities and Towns. Dallas. reported some between ation. been sent In the Jurisprudence, The bitter cold necessitated the' Committee Monday on a motion closing ol many area schools Sen. Hszchvood offered a mo tion lo reconsider and spread Uic journal the iby Sen. Wardlnw Lane of Center. I Monday with several to remain Hire content ol .03 uf an inch. Tuesday's hish temperature was expected lo he near 30 with an overnight low in the high 20's Abilene low :W'S' high is ,expected in the high 30's or low 40's, Doty said .Monday's temperature varied bad Bailiff's was rc-reforred lo llazclwood's action is a parlin-, i i zzx for debate at any time lllc bl" at 2 pm' 'day. 'school only 8 degrees, from a low of Hazelwood had voted with Sen.'closed Tuesday. IR a high of 28. Lane which made him eligible to- Taylor County Supt. of Schools An overnight mystery was Ihe the motion to reconsider. 'Olive 1'ierci1 s.'ird (hat rapid disnppt'arancc of thc ice the Committee on Jurisnrudencc i Ratliff had ar-JKImdalc, lluilfrfic-ld. Wylic f.tid ami snow which fell Monday. Doty tnc committee on Cap vu-re to rt ma i ii-said a combination of ground heat Tuesday but were to be'plus atmospheric conditions the ice and snow to evapo- All Abilene city schools and Tyc-rate. Winds were mostly calm were open. 'Mrimlay night. There now appears a Area schools which remained; Telephone circuits and tines and (hat the llazclwood rnnve Tuesday included Colcinan.ipower lines held up in good fash- make Ihe heaving unnecessary. jSaiila Anna, Mozelle, Talpa-Cen-.ion under Ihe brief spell of cold In thc Mouse, Rep. Truett t.al-j jwcalhcr. imer of Abilene oblaineri a public (hearing dale on his Iwo Impact bills. Rop George i'reslon of Par- is, chairman of the House Com-; mittcc on Municipal ami Private! Corporations, said he would have! Ihc hearing either Thursday aft- NEWS SICTION A rnoon or Kriday. Preston said it will be Thurs- day afternoon if the House votes to adjourn lor the weekend on Thursday. If a House session is planned Kridoy, lhe hearing will be that afternoon. To Your Good Health Amustmcnrs Sporti SECTION I 2 2 7 Womin's news Cemics Obifueries Several meetings were post- of lhe weather. An American Association o( 'Hetired I'ersons meeting sched- uled Tuesday at p.m. in lhe 'First Slate Hank's Cloid Room jwas cancelled until further notice. 1 Hosji'rs. Rreckenridge IChiimbcr ol Commerce president, .saiil the anniiiil baixniet sched- .uled for Tuesday at 7 p.m. In the American Hall, had been rescheduled for Monday, M, TV 7 P-m. to .1   

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