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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 10, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 10, 1962, Abilene, Texas                               porter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS 'OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 81ST YEAR, NO. 207 ABILENE, TEXAS. WEDNESDAY EVENING. JANUARY 10. 1962-TWENTY-FOUR PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Record-Setting Cold New Snowf Low Of 5 to 10 Due Bitter cold and near zero (em- curtailed although some delays peralures gripped Abilene and; vicinily again Wednesday ami the weather forecast indicates con- tinued cold with the possiliilily of additional snow late Wednesday night and Thursday. Lowest area reading reported Wednesday morning was 2 de- grees at Divide in Nolan County. Abilene recorded. 8 degrees, a near al) lime low for a Jan. 10. Conditions also sen! the barome- ter reading in Abilene to its highest point ir. (he 77-year his- tory o flhe weather bureau here. The cold, following a norther which blasted through the area Monday night, has forced several area schools lo close, but a 11 schools in Abilene and Taylor County were open for classes Wednesday. At Rising Star, gas pressure was low and residents were re- ported having a difficult time get- ting enough gas for heating pur- poses. The population of lhe town is about Al Brownwood. a main gas sup- ply broke Wednesday morning, lowering pressure in the lines and causing Brownwood school district lo stop classes and send children home, the Associated Press re- ported. Transportation has not experienced in commer- cial air traffic at Abilene's Muni- cipal Airport. Telephone, power and gas serv- ice has not been interrupted by the frigid weather. The Abilene District office of lhe State Highway Department reported Wednesday morning lhat all highways were in good order but urged motorists to drive wilh caution. Some icing conditions can be expected on bridges bul such Sec NEW, fg. II-A, Cols, 4. 5 Pecos Volley Blizzard Seen By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS I extreme southwestern portion of Parts of Texas braced for Northwest Texas, heavy snow Wednesday and all! Around noon, snow fell al El the state remained enveloped in Paso. Wink, Midland, l.ubbock, and San Angeto. The weather received blame (or CHANG DO-YOUNG i convicted of plotting South Korean Junta Leader Sentenced to Gallows Death bitter colci. The Weather Bureau shortly aft- er noon issued a blizzard warning a( least II deaths for the area west of Ihe Pecos i 7no Bureau lodav is- Valley in West Texas, blizzard warning for the strong winds and snow of up to wcst Vallpy. uiches. l The warning read, "Snow accii- Kl Paso prepared for 3-4 4 inches or more loday by Thursday mommy. [rorn lhe Pccos Vnllcy And Ihe Weather Bureau winds 2'0 accumulations-of snow from 1 to 40 h and considerable inches could he expected over otherwise cloudy with light snow through Thursday, Con- limied very cold. tonight 2 to n. HiSh Thursday 27-37." The bluer weather stretched from Ihe Panhandle to the Unit of Mexico, where ice formed on the water and e.xlended out 100 yards al Texas City. Texarkiina on the northeast lip of the state, reported the heaviest SEOUL, South Korea IAP) Junta renjlulionaiy courts havejnounced the suicide of snowfall of'the current bad spell. Chang Do-young, first titular more than 200 persons so I leading official accused of con-.The Weather Bureau said its in- of tl-.e junta thai toppled civil rule in South Korea, was convicted to- day of plotting against the mili- far. and today's sentences brought to 16 the number of per- sons condemned to death. Seven, spiring against it. It said U'i slriimems measured 7.5 indies. WINTERTIME CHOO-CHOO When the temperature gets down to 8 degrees as The temperature dropped to ll dm early Wednesday, youngsters sometimes run out of somethinn to do. Harold Chung-yong. 47. director of the tary government he headed. these scmences h. exncoted. lhe revolutionary Ixinal set up by his former col-' out. death. Seven M prosecution ;il anj 'he same iave been nis reading is expected Thursday. iDec. 24 vhile tinder investigation was wilhhl 3 llpe''ecs that Wafer Depi. Man Fired; One Rehired Employment of another City Water Department worker has been terminated ami one previ- ously fired was rchired on indef- inite probation following further lie detector testing Monday, it was learned Wednesday. The new termination left al sev- en Uio number of employes fired. The rehlring of one of Ihesc brought lo four Ihe number placed on probation, including one who was given a 30-day suspension leagues sentenced him to die onj been 'he gallows. i Chang, the army chief of staff at Ihe lime of lhe Slay coup and a of (he Korean War. agreed only afler the coup was an ac- complished fact to head (liu ing junta and take the country's premiership. Throughout his two months in office the real power was held by Gen. Chung Ifcel Park, (he lender of Ihe coup who' replaced Chang as head of Uiej junta. Condemned lo death will) Changi on similar charges of coimterrev-! olulionary activity was his former secretary, ex-Col. Lee Hoi Yung. The five-man tribunal also or- dered life sentences for four de- The military government a North Korean spy. fendants, including two junta members; gave former prison terms ranging from 5 to 15 years lo nine persons and acquitted nine others. Death verdicts automatically go lo an appeals court. If upheld there, they must be reviewed by without pay. Names of lhe work-1 Gen. Park. ers were not revealed. The revolutionary City Manngcr Roberl Tinst- man said Wednesday morning he met with Water Department em- ployes Tuesday lo outline new op- crating policies and procedures lie hopes will put an entl to the loss of new and surplus city materials. He said the investigation, which began Dec. 19. is now completed and asked citucns to continue confidence in the cily employes prosecutor called Chang "a sly, base oppor- tunist" anil accused him of play- ing both sides of the fence. lie said Chang sent military po- nce lo Ihe Han Hiver bridge May 1C lo block cixip forces from en- tering Seoul to oust Ihe elected government of Premier John M. Chang. After he joined the junta, the prosecutor charged. Chang condoned efforts of his followers cleared nf implication in the lossim lake over Ihe government by of the materials. organizing a fractional group WEATHER 11. S. DEPARTMENT OF COUMKRCB IIE.ITIIEK (Wtllhcr mip. AND V1CIMIV IllJdiui l ami ioon and niehl late WcdneMiay tKisctl on "proiincialism" oilier personal conneclions. Tlic two fomier junta members given life sentences were Col. Park Chi-ok, commander of the parnlroop unil thai spearheaded the coup, anrl C'ol. Moon .lai-joon. provost marshal after the of the record. Many cities reported tempera- Hires the lowest for this dale since the 1800s. While the snow fell al 'lermomeU'rs read 5 degrees. Zero is expected Thursday. Lone Star Gas Co., serving OOQ customers in 4S5 cilies anil towns in Texas and southern Okla- Iwma, sel a record for deliveries. Customers used cubic feet in the 24 hours ending at 7 a.m. Wednesday. Previous record was cubic feel Jan 28. last ycnr. A part of Texas Cit out gas in I em peralures dropped to 12 degrees coldesl since IflSK. Shortly temperatures there warmed to 20. _. i ii f o. iu Mil. I lai ULtl Perry. 10-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs J. W. Perry of 790 Sammons, turns bad weather into good [mi by blowing his breath and making "smoke" Good fun .hat is. until frost bite sets in. Other cold MenUier photos on Pg 1-B (Staff Photo' 'IV Jtmmv Pnvcnncl by Jimmy Parsons Congress Opens Today; Kennedy Plugs Programs Krlalpr! stories Pjf. -t-A -jlhal called the House into session 'and to preside pending the formal WASHINGTON' 'APi-Conaress' got its new session formally mi- lder way today wilh comfilctiun of routine organizational duties. of ltlc Congress. Battle election of John W. McCormack was willJ Bul tllcl'cal kickuff for "ill form immediately. of Massachusetts, who was Demo- (lntielection-year session which could' the first time at any mid. cratic floor leader under Ray- hcatcd since to .succeed the Texan as after leS'slal've v.ill House gathered today without a 'come H-lirti President Kennedy speaker. Texan Sam Raybtirn! addresses a joint meet Thursday, who had ruled it in so many years' flollse Democrats caucused In his Stale of the Union mes-M Democratic control, died and chose Rep. Carl Al- least in broad out line. Damaging cold reached inlo the Lower Rio Grande Valley, where farm experts feared it killed some young vegetables in the fields. At Ihe other extreme of thel stale. Dalhart in (he upper Pan- handle reported mercury readings of 14 degrees below zero. Luhbock and Amarilio reported 3 degrees aboi'e zero, while Gal- vcston reported 20 degrees. Kil- gore, in East Texas, had a low; of 7 degrees. Public schools in Kilgore were closed. Austin reported a record low for lhe date of 13 degrees. Forl Worth's 9 degrees was a record for .tan. 10, Dallas' 8 was the lowest since Feb. 1, IWI, when the temperature wen! to 7 dp-, grces shark regulation Other representative minimumsJ Ht'P- a i n R i- r sage, Kennedy will lay down, at 'November. I ben of Oklahoma as their floor he So it fell to Ihe House clerk.! 'leader in succession lo McCor- hopes to get from this second scs-: Ralph Roberts, lo hang the gavel House Passes Escheat Bill Al'STKV members This Rave each house a 1-fl rec-' I put off debate of fann LVjiiiir and took up discus-. The Senile passed and >cm to sion of Ihe loan Ihc House Monday i.SHI J of [ilans In for maintaining 'mack. McConnack had no party oppo- sition for speaker and it appeared for a lime that the Republicans would not even go through the feature of p'.r.ting up a candidate of their own. In a morning caucus. Ihe Re- publicans decided to do what ths minority party nearly always does anil offer their floor leader, Rep. Charies A. Halleck of Indi- ana, lo the House for the speak- Senate Republicans in their cau- 'CHS chose Sen. Bourke B. Hicken- 'loopcr of Iowa as chairman of the Senate Republican Policy Commit- early Wednesday were Alpine G Whrrto, .iskrd ih.il furlaJiins; new JM  replace.Victoria dropiK-il fwitbnll after the are prelly wild sometimes, all Xorlh Crnli-al Texas can !l chk'r the few imixntanl ijliwaj' ileiiny Williams. ,ifw riMsmvl in IftW srason and Kussoll has been IX du- of IW1 to tin hislin retirement in the South Texsp is nnoidoctorate in mathcmalics al IhC't-Jty since lhat time. i ers named him ilimlm. "Prelly soon, we were Riving Iha1t, Jl'f hjs when he j above, northwest 2 below to of of Texas. McCarver. a 1931 giaduatc of uas not' Hnwartl Payne also named C.jllowanl Payiu1. is a former Yellow IJicornpleit'd al thi- regular iNiK> Mct'arvcr as athletic'.Jacket football :iud track star. He jRaiiiel's messaRi' lo the Md'arvcr. also an alum- twict- was a Little AK-America The announcements were madeiMacAdoo Kt'iiion. tricks from Borman an NEWS INDEX SECTION A TV Report Sporti Bridge To Your Good Health SECTION B Buiimn Outlook Wamtn's ncwi Amuitfntntt Comki MitxUli S 4-7 8 I 3 J 6 7 t 11 11 ASPCA allomlaiH gives his commands in German a slunt lhat keeps oilier people from gel- ling inlo the'act. Rending lo Halpern's calls, Bimlw will in circles, .sil, island, walk on hind lens, jump i fences, his CURB door nnd Iso on. If Ihesc tricks aren't enough lo illustrate Bimbo's intelligence, there'll one other characteristic lhat might be noted: he always turns ami 111115 when lite smallest lank and a Irtick loaded with sol- diers collided in (he painlyzing cold Tuesday. The crash injured 12 other men Olhcr victims included Mrs. Ruth Sagcbicl. 52. of Rl. 2. Tem- ple, drowned as her car skidded Spears. San Antonio, antl Rep. ,1. .by Dr. liny D. Newman, Howard I President Newman had this W. Buchanan. Dumas, have inlro-jPayne University president, .if (or i say about his new athletic heads: ditcnl current bills "which recon-in iiieeliiiK of Ihe university board1 "We believe that these two men ciled lhe trustees Tuesday night. al the regular session and offers! Russell, one time head coach of an opportunity lo enact this im- pnrlant tin's session.' .Southern Molliodisl St.'lil will bring (o us a new feeling of confidence from our alumni, the L'liLvcrsity.iprescnt sludcni body and our His friends evi'tyuhere. We (eel lhat off an icy bridge inlo four feeti The represenlativcs argued'salary lerms were nol  oiins men to go oul passett Price Daniel's of the must colorful coaches; and represent our school In finest v'hriMinn tradition. me a vilal. imixirt.ini and really indispcjisthlc part of any broad, to bring bunks under abandoneil'in the Male. He compiled one ol Texas' fnnlaslic winning records while cimchitig al Masonic Home properly laws i primary iTe.x reason for calling lhe session. The'whi calling vole was 86-5C. 'High School and later cojchetlisucxessfui collejiu   

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