Abilene Reporter News, December 31, 1954

Abilene Reporter News

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Publication name: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Pages available: 856,914

Years available: 1917 - 1977

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Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 31, 1954, Abilene, Texas fami Sunday im lit Importer MOBNISG w jr VOL. LXXIV, NO. 195 "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE. TEXAS, FRIDAY MORNING, DEC. 31, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAILY AY UK Turns To Drizzle By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A storm that snowed under the Biidseciion of the country for two flays petered out Thursday us it moved eastward and turned into freezing drizzle and cold fog. The midcontinent storm caused 13 deaths. Snow Boosb Crop Outlook By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Warmer temperatures brought northern Texas out from under a blanket of snow and ice Thursday, clearing highways and boosting crop" prospects as the moisture soaked slowly into the ground. Continued warm temperatures and some -showers were predicted for Friday. All highways were open by Thursday noon as the last dan- gerous slick spots melted. Snow remained only in sheltered places. High clouds covered much of the slate and light rain was reported in the. Corpus Christi area. The snow reached 8 inches in areas of the Panhandle, South Plains and North Texas. Berry L. Marshall, assistant state conservationist at Temple, laid the moisture would "be of tremendous help .to sr.iall grain in North and West Texas." "More moisture will be .Marshall said, "to get the ground in shape (or spring planting. Eight inches of snow equals only about an inch of rain." High of 60 Due Today and Friday Soaring temperalures due the Abilene area Friday and Saturday will spell melt for the remaining mow and ice. The weather forecaster Mu- nicipal, Airport Thursday night saM temperatures would hit a maxi- mum of 60 degrees both Friday and Saturday, holding to a low of 40 overnight. A cold front in the northern United Slates that could have meant more cold weather will miss thii area, the weatherman said. HENRV J. COOK rommbsioofr diet Jones County Official Dies STAMFORD. Dec. 30 Henry J, Cook, 66. commissioner of Jones Counly Precinct 2, died Thursday morning in Stamford Sanitarium. Mr. Cook had formerly served for 11 years as superintendent of the Stamford water department. Funeral will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Stamford First Baptist Church nf which he was a member. Officiating will be the Rev. Byron Bryant, pastor. Burial in Highland cemetery will be directed by Kinney Funeral Home, A native of Morvcn, Ga., Mr. Cook came to Texas in 1907 and willed at Wichila Frills where he was employed by the Fort Worth and Denver Railroad, tie was trans- ferred io Stamford in 10U and continued with the railroad until Ittt when be was employed ai an engineer and water superintendent fcr the city of Stamford. resigned m water superin- tendent to enter (he contracting business, lie was subsequently elected a county commissioner and waa serving bis third term nt the tiipeof hiidoMh. to wrrived by his the fcnMr Lam Dobtu, whom he at CbUdresi In till; toe, Jack of Corpui Carlsti; two daughter., Mn.> W. E. Toch o( and tin. 0. H. Ed- of Bronkshlrei two broth- Ctwrlle Cook of Ontario, Calif, rad John Cook at Stamford; a ill- tor, Mrs. Nina Tulcber of Wichita rate; and grandchildren. The Weather Bureau said the fog and drizzle were reported from many parts of New England. What was left of the storm in the Mid- west and Southwest, the bureau said, fizzled iato a few light snow flurries in Michigan. More New Sow Caribou, in northern Maine, added 4 inches of new, light snow Thursday to give that community a grand total of 2g inches. Ml. Washington, N. R, reported inches of snow. Scattered light snow flurries also were reported in the Northern Plains states and sections of the Western Plateau region. Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Dickinson, N. D. each reported 1 inch of new snow. Cold air covered the Northern Plains and the Upper Mississippi Valley. i Inches at Luktwck Snow ended late Wednesday in Ihe hard-hit Southwest region. The job of digging out of the season's biggest snow storm in parts of Kansas, Texas and Okla- homa was made easier Thursday by bright sunshine and tempera- tures generally in the low 40s. The Weather Bureau said only 2 inches of snow were on the ground Thurs- day morning at Lubbock, Tex., and other Texas points. SPARKLING Singer Marion Marlowe wears a sparkling smile and a sparkling six and one-half carat diamond engagement ring alter the announcement of her engagement to Larry Puck, 55- year-old producer. Soon after Marion, star on Arthur Godfrey shows, received the engagement ring, Puck was removed as pro- ducer of "Arthur Godfrey and His Friends" but not as pro- ducer of "Talent Scouts." God- frey declared he did not fire Puck and gave his blessings to the romance. (Story on Pg. S-A) APPROVES FIRINGS 5th Amendment No Excuse, Judge Says WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 Federal Judge Charles F. Me- Laughlih ruled today thai invoking the Fifth Amendment to escape testifying about communism, sab- otage and subversion is "obvious causa" for fired from a civilian job. His decision the right Ihe General Co. to dis- charge workerp who invoke the constitutional amendment's protec- tion against possible self-inerirof- nation and refuse to answer ques- tions of congressional committees. .Fudge McLaughlin said in District Court: Huge Wesfex il Property Sold Again DALLAS, Dec. 30 oil deal involving more than 20 million dol- lars in producing properties was closed here today. General American Oil Co. of Texas was the purchaser and Bradley Oil Co. the seller. Both firms have headquarters here. Transferred to General Ameri- can was a interest in the pro- ducing properties formerly owned by Concjor Petroleum Co., Abilene, Tex., in West Central and West Texas. Bradley Oil, headed by Robert J. Bradley, earlier acquired the interest in a two-part purchase of Condor stock. The separate pur- chases involved about 20 million dollars. Later Condor Petroleum under- went a partial liquidation out of which General American obtained its approximate 75 per cent inter- est in all Condor physical proper- ties and production. (General American this month set up a division office in Abilene, with Aley Pyeatt as division man- ;ger, to handle this production.) Chief producing properties are in the Round Top Field in Fisher County and the Good Field In Bor den County. Dslly oil output has been reported at about bar rels under restricted flow. Condor Petroleum was founded by Ellis A. Hall, Abilene oilman killed in a airplane crash in Alaska. The Condor property in- terest not acquired by General American Is held by Hall's heirs. "The Fifth Amendment does not guarantee that a person who in- vokes it will not be subject to an unfavorable inference. The court concludes that it likewise does not guarantee the person who invokes it shall be continued in his em- ployment." JIcLaughlin said the con- tiact between General Electric and United Electrical Workers gave the company the right to discharge workers for "obvious cause." He rejected the contention of the union, an independent which was ousted from the CIO in 1949 for allegedly following the Communist line, that the company's policy in- volved deprivation of Fifth Amend- ment rights of employes who in- voked the privilege against self- incrimination. The judge agreed with General Electric that the Fifth Amendment does not extend that far. No CoatentiM The union made no contention that the fired employes were not permitted to invoke the privilege against self-incrimination. But it did argue that their discharge be- cause of their reliance upon the privilege violated their constitu- tional right. Judge McLaughlin disagreed. The union brought suit to Vnock out what was described as the company's statement of policy con- cerning admitted Communists, saboteurs, and subversives; and employes who invoke the Fifth Amendment in order to refuse to testify on such mailers. The union insisted that under its collective bargaining agreement such firings were subject to ar- bitration. Judge McLaughlin ruled, however, that Ihe company and the union in entering into the con- tract "did not intend that the dis- charge of employes covered by the contract should be subject to review by a third party, either court or arbitrator." 6 More Insurance Companies Charged WASHINGTON, M UK-Toe Federal Commission today charged six more accMent aad health insurance companies with, false and misleading advertising. The complaints, which cover firms collecting premiums totaling than n mfflta dollars a year, brought to waabtr chnrfwl with "unfair or acts pric- Ucn" under Law, named today by FTC Chairman Edward T. Howcry In- cluded Guardian NEWS INDEX SICTION A Oil J J 4 7 SICTION I OfKJCI CbuifM mil 4 tiwrlitti I TV I 4, S J French Okay Averts New Western Crisis Manpower Cut Nine Per Cent In Two Years WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 IK-The Defense Department reported to- day that in the two years ended last June 30 it cut military man- power strength by 9 per cent and civilian rolls by 6 per cent, all without weakening combat power. The report was made to a House Civil Service subcommittee headed by Rep. Corbett (R-Pa) which has been studying the military's use of manpower. Corbett said in an accompanying statement that the military, for the next two years ending next June 30, had found uni- formed and civilian positions "un- necessary to the accomplishment of their primary defense ohjec- with a resulting saving of some 900 million dollars a year. The Defense Department report said that as of last June 30 there were about men and wom- en in uniform. "This number represents a de- crease of or roughly 9 per cent from the military personnel in uniform as of June 30, it said. "During the same period a reduction of over 6 per cent in civilian personnel was accomplished from a total of to Regarding the Army, the report said manpower improvements over the past 3H years have been a big factor in allowing a planned strength of 20 combat divisions as of next June despite a IS per cent slash in uniformed personnel and a cutback in civilian employment It said the Navy had in the Marine civilians on June 30, 1952. Two years liter the Navy liad cluding 000 civilians, it 11 per cent cutback over-all "despite no reductions in combat potential of the Marine Corps or activated naval .ships and an increase of over 900 active aircraft." It said the Air Force boosted its forces during the year ended last June 30 despite a drop in civilian personnel authorizations from 087 to and in military au- thorizations from 3K3.62S So 394. Denver Firm Buys State Oil Company DENVER West Oil Go. of San Antonio was Thurs- day to the Tennessee Gas Trans- mission Co. of Denver. Consideration for the stock sale was not disclosed but the price was estimated at SH to 7 dollars. WAITING FOR DECISION French Premier Mendes- France, left, smiles as he leans on a desk in the National Assembly in Paris as deputies convened for the showdown decision on the fate of the Western Defense Alliance and the premier's government. At right is Guerinde Beau- mont, minister of justice. Between them is Roland Moustier, state secretary of foreign affairs. (AP) NOT ENOUGH Houston Refuses Million Cosh HOUSTON, Dec. X a j conference, Victor BouWin. can-' second time this year the city of pany to ,ttorneyi Houston refused today to -accept a million dollars in cash from South- western Bell Telephone Co. An armed guard dumped 404.M in cash on the city hall desk of Fred Ankenman, tax assessor- collector. Ankenman, who had turned down io the same man- ner Jan. 15 a year ago, again ex- plained that Texas has no pro- vision for' partial payment of a tax bill. Officials Disagree City and company officials dis- agree upon the amount of 19S3 and 1954 taxes owed by Southwestern Bell. Tax bills of about and were submitted for the two years but company officials contend the amounts should be and After today's two-hour City Hall FAMILY WEEKLY ARTICLES EXPLORE MANY SUBJECTS Family Weekly, America's big, new gravure Sunday magazine, is coming to you ss a new feature' of the Reporter-News. The first issue will appear next Sunday, Jan. 2, and there will be an excit- ing, entertaining issue every Sunday thereafter. You will welcome Family Weekly to your home. You will beautiful full-color pages. You will like its fine pictures and the way Family Weekly's articles explore all the interesting things going.on in the world today. You will like Patty Johnson's regular column, "I Was Just the big section of unusual recipes; the news about fashions and all the other fine features that make Family Weekly downright good reading. took for Family Weekly this Sunday and even- Sun- day with your copy of the Reporter-News. BUSES STALLED l Students Stranded; Rule Schools Close RIM. Dec. and ice covered roads nave caused Rule schools close until Mon< day. They had reopened Tuesday fol- lowing (lie Christmas holidays. BUMS which started taking rural ppils home Tuesday afternoon had tmn stranded and had not com- pleted return trip Rule until Thursday. of pupils spent Tim- day and Wednesday nights in farm until they could be called tot by (heir parents or the could complete tntir runs. Schools Coconr said classes would resume Mon- day. Paved highways in rural areas are mcatly open but much of the nine-Inch now still covers rural reeds over which school buses must travel. Iced-over roads have alao caus- ed cancellation of the annual watch at the First Meth- odist and First Baptist Cancellation ef the Mrvicea was announced by Her. Wetdon MeCormick ef tbe MetbedM Church and the Rev. Wtytad Beyd ef CUnrdu The Rtde sctacnet eerv THE WEATHER AMLENE AND VrMw u4 s CtVTmAL AND WEST TEXAS rtM.tr ud WIT SteimM MrtW ctoXr ud ASD SOUTH CENTHAL rata cMjr tow 11 Mr M km X a

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